Sparrow Pants and Keith Smith of The Resonant Rogues busking at the Flat Iron on Battery Park Ave. and Wall St. Photo by Erin Derham, Buskin' Blues.

Buskers to City: Don’t put art in a box

The streets and squares of Asheville were quieter than usual on the afternoon of Monday, Aug. 24. Despite brilliant sunshine and pleasant temperatures, some of the city’s best-known street performers crowded into a meeting room to give City Council members an earful about proposed busking regulations in three high-traffic areas downtown.

ART AT THE SPEED OF LIFE: Jennifer Bueno stands beside her creation "Air Pollution Over China," which references NASA satellite imagery. It incorporates hot-sculpted glass, watercolor, wood and copper wire.

Three artists work in real time during CCCD’s Back to the Drawing Board

The Center for Craft, Creativity and Design’s Back to the Drawing Board series was developed to investigate how the craft object can move beyond a static wall display. The events on Friday and Saturday, Aug. 28 and 29, will be the last in the current four part series. The takeover, as it’s called, includes a trio of artists who will each explore new approaches to traditional craft forms.

LOCAL STAR: Ernest Helton, left, a West Asheville-based musician of Native American heritage, performed “Royal Clog” for Okeh Records. He and his brother Osey, also seen in this circa-1940 photo, were often featured at the Mountain Dance and Folk Festival.

Celebratin­g the 1925 Okeh recording sessions in Asheville

The Okeh Record sessions that took place in Asheville nearly 100 years ago. The New York-based label, in a bid to discover lesser-known Southern musicians, took trips to various locations where, with a portable studio, its engineers pressed wax test records. The Asheville session, held the last week of August in 1925, attracted musicians and vocalists from around the region, their styles ranging from jazz and minstrel offerings to gospel and country. A Friday, Aug. 28 concert and talk commemorates the recordings.