Improvised theatrics; visual soundtracks

Improvised theatrics; visual soundtracks-attachment0

Paralytic Stalks, the 11th release by of Montreal (who are actually of Athens, Ga.), came out in February and the band has since been touring and playing shows like Jimmy Fallon (the clip from that February performance is weirdly hard to find) and here in the Rolling Stone offices:

They really should play the Xpress A&E office (although we do not have such a nice collection of vinyl).

Front man Kevin Barnes told Rolling Stone that for this tour, the band wanted to have multi-layered projections to create something powerful and “to almost play as a visual soundtrack.” Reports of the tour thus far are wildly positive. Barnes said that the theatrics are improvised — he’s known for theatrics (and for costumes, and multi-media, and a kind of glam-rock aesthetic informed by everything from psychedelia to Prince to Afrobeat) — but one benefit to catching the Orange Peel performance at the end of the run of U.S. shows is that those theatrics are likely to have the kinks worked out.

But theatrics and projections aside, Paralytic Stalks,is a kinetic jolt in and of itself. Opener “Gelid Ascent” is a gilded live wire, crackling across the soundscape. “Dour Percentage” (heard, acoustic-style, in the clip above) is a sonic tapestry drawing from folkloric melodies and thick disco grooves, all as a platform for Barnes’ dynamic, dramatic vocal.

Of Montreal plays the Orange Peel this Thursday, April 5. Showtime is 9 p.m., Loney Dear and Kishi Bashi open. It’s an all-ages show; tickets are $20 in advance and $22 at the door.

Want to win a pair of tickets? Xpress hold a giveaway on Facebook tomorrow (Wednesday, April 4) in the noon hour.

SHARE
About Alli Marshall
Alli Marshall is the arts writer and editor at Mountain Xpress. She's lived in Asheville for more than 20 years and loves live music, visual art, fiction and friendly dogs.

Leave a Reply