Blossoms, buds and a frost warning?

It seems like it took forever to get spring going this year. The wet and cool conditions we’ve experienced during the late winter and early spring in Western North Carolina made it feel like winter just refused to leave our region. (But — even now — there’s a possibility of frost Thursday night, April 25.) They say that good things come to those who wait, and it must be true, because many locations are enjoying gorgeous blooming trees.

Comet watch and coats

No doubt about it: March is off to a chilly start so far. Today’s sunny skies are almost enough to fool you into thinking that spring has arrived … until you step foot outside and the brisk breeze and cold air reminds you that it’s still late winter. If the clouds cooperate, I encourage you to bundle up and take the opportunity to spot the comet PanSTARRS low on the western horizon after sunset for the next week.

Stunning sunset: Another day in Western North Carolina’s winter weather

Timing is everything, especially when weather conditions change as quickly as they do in the mountains. Tuesday morning, Feb. 19, brought huge fluffy snowflakes to the higher elevations, quickly adding up to a couple of inches of snow. The whiplash of a day ended with a stunning sunset that was enhanced by concentric halos around the setting sun.

Impressive clouds and some cool news

It’s fair to say that Western North Carolina has been in an active weather pattern this winter. Every few days, another system approaches the region from the west or northwest, bringing changing weather conditions. And this week was no different. Tuesday afternoon saw another one of these systems roll in and as it did, it also brought some amazing clouds that swept over the valley.

Ice, then fire. Be prepared for the clash of the Titans (and a High Wind Warning)


Last week’s ice-and-sleet storm left a mess in several counties across Western North Carolina. The complex temperature structure in the atmosphere resulted in a thick coating of ice in some areas, but produced just rain in others. Now, after several days of spring-like temperatures, spring-like thunderstorms will impact the region on Wednesday, Jan. 30. A High Wind Warning has been issued by the NWS.

Winter is about to arrive

After three days of rain, many locations in Western North Carolina have reported significant rainfall. Now, the larger-scale weather pattern appears to be shifting into a more winter-like pattern for the Eastern U.S., with a significant winter storm expected later today and arctic air moving in over the weekend. So, hold on: It looks like it’s going to be a bumpy ride!

What will 2013 bring?

Weather conditions in our region so far this year have been described as “mild” — with average temperatures at Asheville Regional Airport running slightly above normal for all but three days since the start of the New Year. And, while it’s hard to find too many folks who complain about mild temperatures in January, it does force the question: How will the weather of 2013 compare to that of 2012?

December makes its big entrance

The month of December had been off to a warm start in Western North Carolina, with the average temperature in Asheville for the first 10 days of the month reported at 10.2° F above normal.  However, Dec. 10’s nighttime cold front brought an end to the warmth. It is feeling like the holiday season has finally arrived — even bringing some light snow to the higher elevations in WNC. The image below shows a light dusting of fine snow on a white pine at 4,000 ft in Madison County on Tuesday morning, Dec. 11.

Round 2 for the Northeast U.S.: The difference between a hurricane and a nor’easter-attachment0

Round 2 for the Northeast U.S.: The difference between a hurricane and a nor’easter

While millions in the Northeast are still trying to recover from the impacts of Hurricane Sandy, the region is bracing for the impact of yet another storm — the infamous nor’easter. (Tonight:Meteorologist Tom Ross will present the long range winter weather outlook. — 6 p.m. at Ferguson Auditorium at A-B Tech.)