Paul Bonesteel screens documentary film “The Mystery of George Masa” at July 28 fundraiser for Environmental and Conservation Organization

GE7_Masa on Greybeard

From a press release:

Paul Bonesteel screens documentary film “The Mystery of George Masa” at July 28 fundraiser for Environmental and Conservation Organization

Local filmmaker Paul Bonesteel will speak and show his documentary film “The Mystery of George Masa” on Monday, July 28, as a fundraiser for the Environmental and Conservation Organization (ECO).  The showing will be in the McIntosh Room of the Blue Ridge Conference Hall, 180 West Campus Drive, at Blue Ridge Community College in Flat Rock.  At 6 p.m., a preview reception with refreshments will feature a talk by Bonesteel about making the film.  Cost for the reception and film showing is $40 per person.  At 7 p.m., the film will be shown with an introduction by Bonesteel.  Cost for attending the film only is $15 per person.  Reservations for the reception must be received by July 23.  Checks made out to ECO with “Bonesteel event” in the memo line, must be received at the ECO office by that date.  Reservation checks for the film showing only are recommended, as well, since seating is limited. Checks for seating should also include “Bonesteel event” in the memo line.  Mail checks to ECO, 611 N. Church Street, Suite 101, Hendersonville, NC  28792.

“The Mystery of George Masa” is the story of Masahar Iizuka, aka George Masa, an enigmatic Japanese artist who in the 1920s contributed to the preservation of the Great Smoky Mountains and the creation of the Appalachian Trail with his photography and passion for nature. This heavily researched film was originally released in 2003 on PBS and broadcast again in 2009, in celebration of the 75th anniversary of the Great Smoky Mountains National Park.

One critic said, “A mysterious and fascinating story about a passionate artist and his adopted homeland. It will resonate in you for years.”

Bonesteel was born and raised in Hendersonville.  His mother, Georgia, was widely known for her popular show “Quilting With Georgia Bonesteel,” which ran for several years on UNC-TV. The family owned Bonesteel Hardware in Hendersonville.  Paul has become a respected documentary filmmaker in his own right.  He produced “The Day Carl Sandburg Died,” a documentary film about Carl Sandburg, who lived and died in Flat Rock. That film has also shown on PBS. His company, Bonesteel Films, is located in downtown Asheville.

“Paul’s passion for capturing in film the Appalachian heritage of nature and history is reflected in this extraordinary documentary,” said Mary Jo Padgett, ECO’s Executive Director. “When I was first introduced to Mr. Masa through this film, I knew I had learned about an important page of local history.  What events led to the creation of the Great Smoky Mountains National Park, a World Heritage Site in our own backyard?  This well-done film tells us much we didn’t know.”

ECO is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization started in 1987 and located in Hendersonville.  ECO’s mission is to help citizens preserve the natural heritage of Western North Carolina and to be an effective voice for the environment.
For more information visit the ECO website at www.eco-wnc.org or phone 828-692-0385.


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