UNCA’s “Seriously Creative” TV spot wins award

UNC Asheville’s “Seriously Creative” TV spot won a 2012 Bronze Telly at the 33rd annual Telly Awards competition. The 30-second video was produced by the university’s communication and marketing staff and Mind Over Media, a Pittsburgh agency.

Watch the video below:

Read the full release:
From the press release from UNC Asheville News Services:

UNC Asheville’s new, 30-second television commercial was recently awarded a 2012 Bronze Telly in the 33rd annual Telly Awards competition. The 30-second spot, titled “Seriously Creative,” was entered in the Commercial/Regional TV & Multi-Market Cable – Schools/Colleges/Universities Category. This is the first Telly Award the university has won.

The commercial was produced by UNC Asheville’s Communication and Marketing staff along with Mind Over Media, a Pittsburgh agency. It features UNC Asheville students and faculty, and is part of the university’s new branding efforts that show how creative thinking is an inherent part of the UNC Asheville experience.

The Telly Awards, founded in 1979, honor outstanding local, regional, and cable TV commercials and programs as well as video and film productions, and online commercials, video and films. A panel of more than 500 industry professionals judged the competition, which had nearly 11,000 entries in numerous categories from across the U.S. and other countries.


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0 thoughts on “UNCA’s “Seriously Creative” TV spot wins award

  1. mat catastrophe

    I wonder if current UNC-Asheville communications kids were as pissy about the decision to actually hire professional videographers as they were in the late 90s when this same thing was done?

    ‘Cause you know what happens when you let the student videographers make your college promo video?

    You get this:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pVENWl8uBeg

    And no one wants that.

  2. Curious

    How much did the 30-second spot cost to produce?

    How much did the Pittsburgh agency charge?

    Did UNCA solicit proposals from Asheville agencies? If not, why not?

    How does UNCA assess the effectiveness of the spot?

    In what media markets was the spot placed and at what cost?

    And for purposes of comparison with ASU’s student made spot, it now has 1,669,269 hits on You Tube. UNCA’s “Seriously Creative” has had
    2,847 hits since it went over last November.

    Also, for comparison, Lassi Hurskainen’s video has had 3,526,019 hits in about the same time.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-8MvWg-wCtE

    Are student-made videos are most cost-effective after all?

    • mat catastrophe

      Hey, I bet you’re one of those disgruntled UNC-A alums I alluded to above (dig the alliteration, baby, some people pay extra for people to write like that)…..

      I won’t even try to comment on cost or markets or bids with local companies. Let the school’s PR department con you with whatever bull they want to sell you.

      What I will tell you is that your comparison videos are, um, useless for comparison.

      You want to know why App State’s video has over a million views? Because it’s bad. It’s not just bad, it’s INCREDIBLY bad. It’s ED FREAKING WOOD bad. It has that many hits because it has gone viral at least twice (and once before it was even on youtube. no kidding, things went viral even before that). If you watch that video and think to yourself, “I want to go to ASU” then you probably need mental help. Or you should just shoot yourself.

      As to the soccer video, it certainly bears all the hallmarks of crappy student-made video. Bad lighting, bad audio on the speaking bits, repetitive and horrible (and probably unlicensed) audio track, bad edits, bad shot composition, it’s too long and, frankly, it’s boring. Why does it have 3 million hits?

      Because soccer people will click on any piece of junk that has “soccer” in the title.

      Seriously, you could put “soccer” on any video and get 10000 hits before word goes out that you didn’t have any soccer in it and that your house should be burned down. It’s even funnier if you post a 3 minute segment of NFL footage.

      So, are student made videos cost-effective? Sure. But are they aiming at the right audience and not making a joke of themselves?

      Probably not.

  3. Media Watcher

    Curious raises some good journalistic questions about use of university resources at a time when budgets are tight. Is the question of why he university chooses to go outside the community not relevant?

    The video is called “Seriously Creative,” implying that students at UNCA are creative or are challenged to be creative. Should their creativity not have been brought to bear on a marketing campaign campaign for the school? If their work isn’t up to snuff, what are they being taught in their media and marketing classes?

    • mat catastrophe

      If you concern is over the money, then it isn’t relevant where they spent it – it’s only relevant that they spent it or how much they spent.

      If you want to restrict their ability to get the best deal they can on promotional videos, feel free to push state legislation requiring that NC public universities spend their PR dollars instate, preferably within 100 miles of their campus. At that point, you’ll have local firms inflating their prices because they know the schools have to deal with them and, probably, you’ll get inferior product as well.

      Surprise! Mat can make “free market” claims as well as any fake libertarian, and they make more sense.

      Now, here’s the thing and I say this not knowing if you’re a student now or have been out as long as me: Students can’t be expected to do professional quality video. They just can’t. They’ve had, maybe, about 12 weeks experience shooting videos spread out over 12 months by the time they graduate. That’s just not enough time to get “good” at it, even though some of them might be budding auteurs (you know who you are).

      You have to get out and get busy doing it all day, every day for some time before you should be trusted to make a national-level commercial for anyone.

      Or, you know, maybe I’m wrong and the entire marketing community with me.

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