KNOWING THE RISK: Scam artists are constantly finding new, ingenious ways to exploit security loopholes and gain access to consumers’ personal information, from installing “skimmers” (pictured above) on unmanned points of transaction to hacking into financial databases. In turn, law enforcement and cyber security experts encourage consumers to protect themselves by being vigilant in knowing how and where scammers strike. Photo courtesy of the Asheville Police Department

Scamming, skimming and financial fraud in WNC

Today’s savvy scammers have a whole host of increasingly sophisticated techniques to quickly steal information and drain bank accounts. To combat these crimes, IT professionals, law enforcement personnel and government officials are encouraging consumers and businesses to remain vigilant at transaction points and take other steps to safeguard themselves from the threat of online hackers.

MEN OF THE LAW: The North Carolina Room’s description of this photo reads, "Portrait of three Asheville policemen around 1908. LtoR: J. L. Ballenger, Capt. John Page and E. M. (Edgar Marcillus) Lyda."

Tuesday History: Impression­s of Asheville, Part III

We continue with W.A. Shafor’s 1911 investigation into Asheville. For those who missed the previous posts, click here for Part I & Part II. As always, follow along with us each week to learn about different time periods in our city’s history, from various unique perspectives and views. Our continued thanks to Pack Memorial Library’s Special Collections, North Carolina […]

COUNTY BUDGET APPROVED: The Buncombe County Board of Commissioners approved a $413,574,951 budget along party lines during its Tuesday, June 21, meeting. Pictured are Democratic Commissioners Holly Jones, David Gantt, Brownie Newman and Ellen Frost.

Commission­ers approve budget; ax proposed tax cut, gun range

The Buncombe County Board of Commissioners wrapped up the budget season during its Tuesday, June 21, meeting by approving a $413,574,951 spending plan for fiscal year 2017. During a more than five hour meeting Commissioner Tim Moffitt proposed an alternate budget, that would lower the property tax rate, but it was shoot down, via party lines, in favor of the approved budget.

MUDDY WATER’S TAKEN ALL: The Great Flood of 1916, the result of more than a week of rain and two hurricanes, ravaged Western North Carolina and its inhabitants, destroying infrastructure, stripping farmland of its topsoil and driving the sides of mountains down into the valleys. With the centennial anniversary of the flood approaching, filmmaker David Weintraub looks back on the devastation, the fortitude of WNC’s communities and why we must heed the lessons learned back then. Photo of South Depot St., Asheville, by William H. Barnhill; via Pack Memorial Library Special Collections

Rememberin­g the Great Flood of 1916

With the Great Flood’s centennial approaching, filmmaker David Weintraub has produced a documentary, Come Hell or High Water, exploring the catastrophe through descendants’ memories, historical photos and contemporary accounts. Xpress sat down with Weintraub to talk about the film, the flood’s impact on the region and the lessons to be learned.

TAKING ON A CHALLENGE: Rainbow Community School core team members, from left, West Willmore, Michael Brown, Susan Daily, Renee Owen, Talia Willingham, Melody Shank and John Bikart are competing in a national contest for millions of dollars to reinvent the American high school. Photo by Liisa Andreassen

Rainbow Community School aims to reinvent learning

What would you do if you were given the chance to reimagine the American high school — and perhaps have your vision made real? The folks at West Asheville’s Rainbow Community School are enthusiastically tackling that ambitious challenge. Last September, West Willmore, Rainbow’s curriculum director, learned through social media about XQ: The Super School Project, […]

COLLEGE BOUND: High School students in the City of Asheville Youth Leadership Academy, pictured, are given access to summer internships, leadership opportunities and more to help prepare them for future employment. Photo courtesy of Erika Germer

City of Asheville taps Youth Leadership Academy participan­ts

A group of local students will each receive a summer internship, networking opportunities and a $2,000 scholarship, through the City of Asheville’s Youth Leadership Academy. The group, comprised of 25 students, was recently selected as the program’s incoming class of 2017. CAYLA, created in 2007, has helped more than 140 students gain real world experience […]

IMG_0282

Looking for solutions to Asheville’s obesity problem

Earlier this month, survey company WalletHub marked Asheville as one of the “Fattest Cities” in the country. Asheville ranked No. 43 among the 100 most populated U.S. metro areas for obesity levels, weight-related health problems and environmental factors. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, meanwhile, reports that the South has the second-highest regional rate […]