Elitist Bastards: The bummer summer of our discontent

Elitist Bastards: The bummer summer of our discontent-attachment0

In this week’s Elitist Bastards Go To The Movies podcast, Mountain Xpress film critics Ken Hanke and Justin Souther are joined by guest Bastard Jeremy Dylan to talk about …

Podcast produced/cohered by Steve Shanafelt. The theme music is “1832” by E. Lee. Art by Jeremy Dylan. The Elitist Bastards podcast is also available on the iTunes store as a free download.

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22 thoughts on “Elitist Bastards: The bummer summer of our discontent

  1. Mike

    Great chemistry on this show. What would it take to coerce Jeremy into becoming a regular via Skype or some other magical internet communication device?

  2. Ken Hanke

    For starters, it would take more technology than we probably have. (Ask Miami Steve.) Also, Tue. at 6 p.m. our time and and when that is in Australia could be a stumbling block. And, bear in mind, that what we’ve seen and what Jeremy has seen lined up better this week than usual because…well, he was here.

  3. Mike

    Yeah, I was commenting wistfully more than anything else. The time difference would be brutal.

    Also, this week’s photo needs more lens flares.

  4. Glad to hear the tri-bastardry went down well with you, Mike.

    6pm Tuesday Asheville time is 9am Wednesday Sydney time and my boss would probably frown on me bantering in work time.

    And the tyranny of distance and release dates would render me unable to attend press screenings with Ken or see films that won’t open down under for three months.

    That said, I found the experience mighty enjoyable and gained a whole new level of respect for Steve’s skill as a coherer. I’d be more than happy to repeat it next time I’m in your time zone, if you’d have me back.

  5. DrSerizawa

    I am rather embarrassed at how spoilery we get over SUPER 8.

    No worries there. We know exactly what to expect when we see a Spielberg movie by now. I doubt that there is a more predicatble Director in the business. Though other hacks like Bay and Emmerich come close.

    Omigosh, did I just call Spielberg a hack?

  6. Amusingly, I had a discussion with a work colleague yesterday about SUPER 8. She thought the film was being incorrectly projected, due to the odd blue lines that kept popping up on the screen.

  7. Ken Hanke

    Omigosh, did I just call Spielberg a hack?

    Well, you strongly suggested it, but I won’t tell anybody.

  8. Ken Hanke

    She thought the film was being incorrectly projected, due to the odd blue lines that kept popping up on the screen.

    Now, that’s amusing.

  9. Ken Hanke

    I feel I should point out that Mr. Spielberg did not actually direct SUPER 8

    When Spielberg produces it seems to amount to much the same thing.

  10. When Spielberg produces it seems to amount to much the same thing.

    Considering you reviewed both TRANSFORMERS movies, I can’t believe your opinion of the man is that low.

  11. DrSerizawa

    I feel I should point out that Mr. Spielberg did not actually direct SUPER 8.

    Well, it seems pretty obvious to me that when Spielberg produces a movie it’s in the mode of the Producers of earlier decades who had far more control over the movie making process than the Directors did. I was being a bit harsh perhaps in comparing him to Bay or Emmerich. However one Spielberg production is pretty much like the next in tone.

    I don’t really dislike Spielberg. But while I enjoyed his earlier films like Raiders and Jaws quite a bit he seems to have been in a rut for a looong time. I expect nothing more than mindless popcorn entertainment from him of little more intelligence than that of Bay. Super 8 was fine to take some kids to but is eminently forgettable.

  12. I think it’s far more likely that, rather than Spielberg co-opting directorial control from Abrams, Abrams sought out Spielberg to produce this film precisely because it was his love letter to films like CLOSE ENCOUNTERS and ET.

    IMPERIAL BEDROOM doesn’t sound Beatlesque because Geoff Emerick produced it. It sounds Beatlesque because Elvis Costello is a huge Beatles fan, which is the same reason he sought out Emerick to produce the record.

  13. Ken Hanke

    I think it’s far more likely that, rather than Spielberg co-opting directorial control from Abrams, Abrams sought out Spielberg to produce this film precisely because it was his love letter to films like CLOSE ENCOUNTERS and ET.

    I don’t think so. Poltergeist is hardly Spielbergesque because Tobe Hooper was making a love letter to some previous Spielberg atrocity.

  14. trex

    “I am not nostalgic for any time that involves bed pans” That’s the first thought that stops me from going back in time to work in the beginning of Hollywood.

    On the Super 8 front, There are some bad Spielberg movies and good Spielberg movies but I am guessing that Ken is not the world’s biggest Goonies fan. (one of the “produced by Spielburg” movies)

    Great show guys. This was your best yet.

  15. DrSerizawa

    Poltergeist is hardly Spielbergesque because Tobe Hooper was making a love letter to some previous Spielberg atrocity.

    Frankly, the first time I saw Poltergeist (which I did like BTW) I never noticed that it was directed by Tobe. When I found out I was somewhat aghast. There’s no “Tobe Hooper” at all in that movie. It’s visually impressive but the Spielberg influence leaches out any creepiness or real scares. It’s entirely Spielbergian without a hint of Texas Chain Saw Massacre.

  16. Ken Hanke

    I am guessing that Ken is not the world’s biggest Goonies fan.

    I cannot imagine what would make you think such a thing!

  17. Ken Hanke

    the Spielberg influence leaches out any creepiness or real scares.

    I find his depiction of family life pretty darn creepy. It’s hard for me to care what happens in a film where I’ve become thoroughly annoyed by every member of the saccharine sitcom family before they’re even imperiled.

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