APD investigating shooting near Asheville Mall

Suit alleges retaliation, discrimination by Asheville Police Department against officer **UPDATED**-attachment0

For Immediate Release

April 28th, 2014

The Asheville Police Department reports:


Asheville – On April 28th, 2014 at 5:11PM, the Asheville Police Department received multiple 911 calls reporting a shooting on South Tunnel Rd. near the entrance to the Asheville Mall.  Witnesses described a white male operating a motorcycle, shooting at a vehicle in traffic occupied by two white males.  Previous reports of a female driving the Honda sedan were not accurate.

 

The shooter wrecked at a mall entrance and ran towards the mall discarding his gun and helmet.  The male entered the Asheville Mall at the Barnes & Noble entrance.  Approximately 20 patrol officers responded to the mall and secured the entrances.  A team of four officers entered the mall and quickly located the suspect at 5:22 P.M., hiding in a bathroom.  The gun and helmet were located

 

There were no injuries in today’s incident.  This was not a random act as these individuals know each other.  The motive for the shooting is unclear at this point in the investigation.  The suspect has been identified as Isaac Allen Beverly, 52, originally from Columbia, SC.  Beverly has been living in the Black Mountain area recently.  Charges are forthcoming on Beverly.

 

The other individuals involved are being questioned at this time.  Additional information will be released when it becomes available.

**Update: Charges filed against Isaac Beverly

Asheville – The Asheville Police Department charged Isaac Allen Beverly with assault with a deadly weapon with intent to kill, discharging a weapon into an occupied vehicle, going armed to the terror of the public, possession of firearm by felon, and no operators license.

He is being held at the BCDF on a $100,000 bond.

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About Jeff Fobes
As a long-time proponent of media for social change, my early activities included coordinating the creation of a small community FM radio station to serve a poor section of St. Louis, Mo. In the 1980s I served as the editor of the "futurist" newsletter of the U.S. Association for the Club of Rome, a professional/academic group with a global focus and a mandate to act locally. During that time, I was impressed by a journalism experiment in Mississippi, in which a newspaper reporter spent a year in a small town covering how global activities impacted local events (e.g., literacy programs in Asia drove up the price of pulpwood; soybean demand in China impacted local soybean prices). Taking a cue from the Mississippi journalism experiment, I offered to help the local Green Party in western North Carolina start its own newspaper, which published under the name Green Line. Eventually the local party turned Green Line over to me, giving Asheville-area readers an independent, locally focused news source that was driven by global concerns. Over the years the monthly grew, until it morphed into the weekly Mountain Xpress in 1994. I've been its publisher since the beginning. Mountain Xpress' mission is to promote grassroots democracy (of any political persuasion) by serving the area's most active, thoughtful readers. Consider Xpress as an experiment to see if such a media operation can promote a healthy, democratic and wise community. In addition to print, today's rapidly evolving Web technosphere offers a grand opportunity to see how an interactive global information network impacts a local community when the network includes a locally focused media outlet whose aim is promote thoughtful citizen activism.

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