Buzzworm news briefs

Black, white — and limited

Cinema in the Park fans will be disappointed to learn that this season, the series is serving up only four Saturday evenings’ worth of vintage silent films, instead of the usual six. The reason?

“Less donations,” explains organizer Rupa Vickers. “I think people generally assume that because the city sponsors this event, they provide funds to pay the musicians and to cover advertising. … But they just provide the sound system.

“We need help from the community, both businesswise and through individual donations,” she adds. “We’re 501(c)(3), so all donations are tax-deductible.”

The Fall 2003 Cinema in the Park series will enliven Pritchard Park every Saturday evening in September, hosted once again by the film-savvy Chip Kaufmann. The free showings start at 8 p.m.; spectators are advised to come early to be sure of a seat. If it’s raining at 7 p.m., that evening’s show will be cancelled.

The series kicks off Sept. 6 with “Family Night,” featuring A Dog’s Love (a 1914 short) and Oliver Twist (a 1922 feature); musical accompaniment provided by Aaron Price and River Guerguerian.

“Adventure” is the theme on Sept. 13, with a showing of The Redman’s View (a 1909 short) and Tumbleweeds (a 1925 feature); music by Price and Guerguerian. The main feature “is just amazing,” says Vickers. “There’s some of the best cinematography of land-rush scenes … that you can imagine.”

Then, on Sept. 20, the mood turns to “Comedy/Romance” with Fatty & Mabel Adrift (a 1916 short) and The Garden of Eden (a 1928 feature); musicians to be announced.

The final installment, on Sept. 27, looks ahead to Halloween with a showing of Frankenstein (1910 short) and Nosferatu (1922 feature); music provided by the Ether Bunnies.

The series is co-sponsored by Asheville Parks & Recreation and made possible by the Bier Garden and audience donations.

For more information, call Vickers at 712-1471.

– Lisa Watters

Sisterhood swings

The women are gathering, and they have clubs. Golf clubs, that is. In celebration of its 25th anniversary, Helpmate, a local domestic-violence agency, will hold its first women’s golf tournament Friday, Sept. 26 at the Black Mountain Golf Club.

The event, says Executive Director Valerie Collins, “is a perfect way for us to reach an audience of women supporters who otherwise might not be aware of what Helpmate offers.” The agency provides emergency shelter, counseling, court advocacy and a 24-hour crisis line to people affected by domestic violence.

Helpmate also likes “to plan events that celebrates women’s strength, and the tournament does that,” adds Collins.

About 100 women golfers of all skill levels are expected to take part.

“Some players will be there to win, some just to have a good time and to support Helpmate,” she notes.

The tournament kicks off at noon and culminates with an awards ceremony and raffle. Winners will receive prizes ranging from spa visits to golf outings to dinners to jewelry and gift certificates, all donated by various local businesses.

To register for the tournament, call 254-2968, ext. 16, or visit Helpmate’s Web site (www.helpmateonline.org). To learn more about Helpmate, call Collins at 254-2968, ext. 13.

– Lisa Watters

Bizworm

Get in on the game

As someone who loves treasure hunts and board games, I’ve got to tell you: The second annual Buy Local Bonanza (which happens Friday, Sept. 5) sounds like a whole lot of fun.

“We wanted to come up with something that would offer a lot to folks who participated,” explains Buy Local Campaign Coordinator Michael Olivier of the Mountain Microenterprise Fund. “It would be fun in the sense of a scavenger hunt, and it would get folks into locally owned businesses … to see that the products and services they offer are at least the same quality, if not a higher quality, than ones offered in nonlocal businesses — the larger national corporations.”

Here’s how it works: This week’s issue of Mountain Xpress contains a Buy Local Bonanza guide, complete with game board and map. On Sept. 5 from noon to 7 p.m., visit any 12 of the 20 locally owned shops and restaurants listed in the guide, making sure to hit at least three from each side of the game board (“so that folks get to visit a good variety of businesses in all areas of downtown,” says Olivier.)

At each location, pick up a sticker as proof of your visit. No purchase is necessary, though participants “will be offered discounts if they decide to shop while in the store,” notes Olivier.

Shoppers with 12 or more qualifying stickers on their game board will be eligible to win prizes. Most participating businesses, as well as others in the Greater Asheville area, have donated prizes, Olivier reports, adding, “We’re trying to get it so that pretty much everyone will win something.”

The event will culminate in a celebration in Pritchard Park from 5-8 p.m. Besides the 7:30 prize giveaway, there’ll be entertainment by Ballet Warraba and Count Clovis, and food vendors offering both vegetarian and meat-based fare.

The Bonanza is part of the Buy Local Campaign launched by the Mountain Microenterprise Fund in 2000 “to keep the economy locally based,” says Olivier. Since then, more than 100 small businesses from Asheville to Murphy have signed up as Buy Local partners, pledging to seek local sources when they do their own purchasing.

For more information, call MMF at 253-2834, or check out their Web site (www.mtnmicro.org).

– Lisa Watters

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