Need a job? Linamar management job fair opens at noon today, July 5; 9 a.m. on July 6

Linamar Corporation is hosting a management job fair July 5, from noon to 8 p.m. and July 6, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.

The event takes place at the Haynes Building on A-B Tech Enka Campus, 1459 Sand Hill Road.

Dertails on the jobs being listed for Linamar/Asheville can be viewed at workopolis.com. The job titles are:
      Materials Manager
Program Manager
Quality Manager
Human Resources Manager
Maintenance Supervisor
Manufacturing Engineer
Engineering Manager
Accounting Manager

Buncombe County’s website reports:
In preparation for launching the organization’s operations in the first quarter of 2012, Linamar’s local recruitment efforts will begin with management and professional positions for all functional departments. This includes plant management, accounting, engineering, maintenance, logistics and procurement, and health & safety, as well as information technology. The company plans to schedule a recruitment event dedicated to production and hourly staff in coming months.The Buncombe County Commissioners, along with the Asheville City Council and Governor of North Carolina announced the arrival of new jobs for the County.

Interested candidates are invited to attend the job fair and are encouraged to submit a resume and cover letter to asheville.jobs@linamar.com.

For additional information about the Linamar Corporation, visit www.linamar.com.

The job fair is held in conjunction with the Economic Development Coalition for Asheville-Buncombe County, a public-private partnership committed to creating and retaining jobs.

Linamar Corporation recently announced its newest precision machining facility in Asheville, with the creation of 400 jobs and an investment of $125 million. This investment signals the first U.S. manufacturing location for the leading global supplier of internal engine and driveline components.

Linamar will occupy the vacant Volvo Construction Equipment campus at Lake Julian, recently secured by Buncombe County to accommodate the company’s expansion plans. Linamar expects to be in operation by the first quarter of 2012, with renovation of the facility to begin immediately.

Founded as a one-man machine shop in a Canadian basement in 1964, Linamar has grown into a supplier for vehicle and mobile industrial equipment markets worldwide, with more than 12,700 employees and sales of $2.2 billion CAD in 2010. The organization includes 39 manufacturing facilities, five research and development centers, and 14 sales offices spanning 11 countries. Linamar’s operations are separated into four functions including Industrial, Commercial, and Energy (ICE), Manufacturing, Driveline Systems, and Skyjack. The new Asheville plant will focus on the ICE operations.

Buncombe County was selected following an exhaustive search of major southeastern markets, focused on skilled workforce availability, manufacturing specialization, and proximity to Linamar’s major accounts. The company required a community which could accommodate their continued plans of expansion in the North American marketplace.

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About Jeff Fobes
As a long-time proponent of media for social change, my early activities included coordinating the creation of a small community FM radio station to serve a poor section of St. Louis, Mo. In the 1980s I served as the editor of the "futurist" newsletter of the U.S. Association for the Club of Rome, a professional/academic group with a global focus and a mandate to act locally. During that time, I was impressed by a journalism experiment in Mississippi, in which a newspaper reporter spent a year in a small town covering how global activities impacted local events (e.g., literacy programs in Asia drove up the price of pulpwood; soybean demand in China impacted local soybean prices). Taking a cue from the Mississippi journalism experiment, I offered to help the local Green Party in western North Carolina start its own newspaper, which published under the name Green Line. Eventually the local party turned Green Line over to me, giving Asheville-area readers an independent, locally focused news source that was driven by global concerns. Over the years the monthly grew, until it morphed into the weekly Mountain Xpress in 1994. I've been its publisher since the beginning. Mountain Xpress' mission is to promote grassroots democracy (of any political persuasion) by serving the area's most active, thoughtful readers. Consider Xpress as an experiment to see if such a media operation can promote a healthy, democratic and wise community. In addition to print, today's rapidly evolving Web technosphere offers a grand opportunity to see how an interactive global information network impacts a local community when the network includes a locally focused media outlet whose aim is promote thoughtful citizen activism.

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