JOINING THE TEAM: Hannah Randall (left) joins Gary Landwirth (center), MANNA’s CEO transition consultant, and Cindy Threlkeld (right), MANNA’s recently retired executive director, at the May 1 dedication ceremony for the successful completion of the Space to Erase Hunger building project. The building project was a major initiative under Threlkeld’s tenure at MANNA, and sets the stage for Randall to further the food bank’s work to end hunger in Western North Carolina.

MANNA FoodBank introduces a new CEO

On May 2, MANNA FoodBank welcomed Hannah Randall as its new CEO. Randall joins the organization after having served in a variety of roles with other nonprofits, including the Animal Protection Society of Person County, Carolina Cross Connection and the Lincoln County United Way. “Her commitment to the wellbeing of the greater community is obvious in everything she does, […]

BENEVOLENT BICEPS: Ladies Workout Asheville  owner Kim Hreha, front, will donate proceeds from her upcoming outdoor anniversary event to five area nonprofits. Photo by Jessie Fultz Photography

Conscious party: Ladies Workout Asheville celebrates 20 years in business with a fitness fundraiser

For movers, Ladies Workout Asheville’s anniversary fundraiser offers an obstacle course and walk-a-thon. Casual attendees are welcome to browse vendors to a DJ set, enter a raffle, participate in work-out demos and take the little ones inside a bouncy house. Festivities take place in the gym’s parking lot on Friday, May 20.

Bike to Work Week is May 16-20 and each day a local brewery will host a fundraising event. At the end of the week the money will be awarded to local nonprofits Asheville on Bikes and Friends of Connect Buncombe.

Breweries help fuel Bike to Work Week

National Bike to Work Week kicks off Monday, May 16, and the initiative is getting a boost from a slew of local breweries. Each night, from May 16-20, a different brewery will host a bike-centric bash, culminating with proceeds from all events being presented to local nonprofits Asheville on Bikes and Friends of Connect Buncombe.

READY FOR ACTION: A group of friends participate in a resilient-living workshop at Ashevillage Institute. Photo courtesy of Ashevillage Institute

Ashevillage’s Community Resilience Challenge tests residents’ skills, resources

“Be prepared” goes the Scouting movement’s mantra. And being able to face any challenge is often a goal of institutions. But the question is always: How? How can we be best prepared for whatever may come? The Boy Scout carries his pocketknife. Emergency services train for possible scenarios. Young people study to pass the big […]

RIGHT HAND TURN: Small tragedies and improved artistry often go hand-in-hand — sometimes literally. When classical musician Nathan Shirley broke one of his two portals to the piano, he developed a unique song concept that he hopes to feature as his next album's title track.

Faces in the crowd: WNC crowdfundi­ng initiative­s

Each week, Xpress highlights notable WNC crowdsourcing initiatives that may inspire readers to become new faces in the crowd. This week features the unique, two-part song that resulted from pianist Nathan Shirley’s musical twist of fate, Piper Jones Band’s new recording project Crossing the Sabine, and Asheville Humane Society’s interactive pet fundraiser.

MOUNTAIN MAJESTY: The Great Smoky Mountains National Park is one of the most beloved and most visited sites in the National Park System, attracting millions of visitors and tourist dollars to the region each year. Its creation was the result of over a decade of legislative wrangling, relentless promotion and fundraising, and the tireless efforts of WNC residents such as George Masa, a Japanese immigrant who helped introduce the Smokies to the American people through his photography. Photo via North Carolina Collection, Pack Memorial Library, Asheville

George Masa and the birth of Great Smoky Mountains National Park

“These efforts really are about protecting places for all Americans and for future generations,” notes Brent Martin of The Wilderness Society. The leaders of the national parks movement, he maintains, “all saw a much bigger picture, not only for all human beings, but for all living things.”