BIG DECISIONS: Asheville voters will weigh in on three separate bond measures: $32 million for transportation projects, including road repaving, sidewalks, bus shelters, traffic-calming measures and greenways; $25 million for affordable housing, including $15 million to repurpose city-owned land for affordable housing and $10 million for the city’s affordable housing trust fund; and $17 million for parks and recreation projects. Graphic assembled by Scott Southwick

Asheville leaders and organizati­ons weigh in on bond choice

City-sponsored early polling indicated that a solid majority of Asheville voters say they will vote for the proposed $74 million city bond referendum on this year’s general election ballots, and far more local groups and organizations have lined up to support the bond than to criticize it. As with any issue, however, opinion is mixed.

BOOM TOWN: Shown here around 1929, Pack Square at that time was ringed by the 1926 Asheville City Hall, the 1903 and 1928 Buncombe County courthouses, Pack Memorial Library, Legal Building, Central Bank & Trust, Commerce Building, Westall Building and Jackson Building. Photo by George Masa, provided courtesy of the North Carolina Collection, Pack Memorial Public Library

Asheville’s bond fears: The legacy of a financial nightmare

Has Asheville recovered from the trauma of its municipal debt crisis, which spanned the years between 1930 and 1976? The debt had a profound impact on Asheville’s development, its cityscape and, lastingly, its appetite for municipal debt. This year’s $74 million bond referendum will put the city’s confidence to the test when it asks voters to choose whether it’s time for the city to borrow again to finance growth.

The Buncombe County Board of Commissioners held a public hearing on the proposed tax schedule during its meeting on Tuesday, Oct. 4. The commission chambers was nearly empty for the hearing and two people spoke.

Public hearing on property tax schedule draws two comments; commission­ers move forward with selling $7.8 million in unused land

Commissioners held a public hearing on the proposed tax schedule that drew two speakers. It also moved ahead with trying to sell five parcels of land, including 137-acres on Ferry Road; the one-time potential site of Deschutes Brewery’s expansion.

HIGH PROFILE: Tina Madison White speaking in Washington. Photo courtesy of Tina Madison White.

Asheville LGBTQ community to celebrate progress, call for change at Blue Ridge Pride Festival on Oct. 1

Author, transgender activist and newcomer to Asheville Tina Madison White reflects on the state of the Pride movement in 2016. White is the director of operations for Blue Ridge Pride Center, which will host its eighth annual Pride Festival Saturday, Oct. 1 in Pack Square Park in Asheville.

Moments before Trump appeared on stage the crowd cheered and chanted. Photo by Dan Hesse

UPDATED: Trump speaks to full house, protesters fill streets

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump will be in town Monday, Sept. 12, to hold a rally. Large crowds, along with potential protests, are expected throughout the day. The event is scheduled to start at 6 p.m. and Trump’s website shows tickets to the rally are no longer available. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton made a […]

Image courtesy of Chiron Publications

Locally published book analyzes Donald Trump in a context of societal narcissism

As November quickly approaches, discussion surrounding one of the most polarizing presidential elections in decades has intensified, from fervent whispers to a cacophonous roar of partisan rhetoric and armchair philosophizing. While voters differ passionately on the candidates’ respective platforms and personalities, there is one topic on which they all seem to agree: Donald Trump is […]