"We have the opportunity to introduce two saints of God," said Rev. Jennifer Baily (far left) introducing James Tyson (second from left) and Bree Newsome (second from right). Also pictured is Micky ScottBey Jones, far right.

Activist Bree Newsome and other ‘faith-driven agitators’ lead a charge for social justice at Wild Goose

The third annual Goose Festival brought together more than 2,000 people from various spiritual persuasions that fall under a very inclusive Christian umbrella. Featured speakers at this year’s event included Bree Newsome, the activist who gained national attention for removing the Confederate flag from the South Carolina statehouse.

Fascinated by international rituals and ceremonies, local artist Melody Molina makes decorative face-wear inspired by cultures across the globe. She'll soon travel to Oaxaca, Mexico to immerse herself in the traditions surrounding the Day of the Dead. Image from Molina's crowdfunding campaign page

Faces in the crowd: WNC crowdfundi­ng campaigns

Each week, Xpress highlights notable WNC crowdsourcing initiatives that may inspire readers to become new faces in the crowd. This week features a local artist’s mask-making residency in Mexico, a new dance school called Terpsicorps, a foam party to follow the cyclocross nationals in Asheville in 2016 and upgrades to an astrology podcast.

CALL ME HARLEY: After selling his house, most of his possessions and quitting his job, 58-year-old Henry Wasserman, under trail-name Harley, began his Appalachian journey on March 19. All photos courtesy of Wasserman.

Transforma­tive journey: Appalachia­n Trail thru-hiker reconsider­s his life path

On February 18, Xpress published “Tales from the Trail,” detailing the experiences of Appalachian Trail thru-hiker Gary Sizer. In the story, we met Henry Wasserman, who was seeking a transformative experience on the A.T. On March 19 Wasserman began his months-long trek north, trudging mile after mile through red Georgia clay.

Dying to Live Theatre at the Altamont

Third Messenger group explores the sacred art of being and dying

A growing movement in Asheville is seeking to make conversations about death more commonplace: Through an ever-evolving series of public art installments and performances that began in early 2014 , locally based Third Messenger has been offering Ashevilleans the chance to share their stories surrounding death and to contemplate their own mortality.