SNAPSHOTS IN TIME: Comparisons between Asheville’s estimated homeless population in 2005 and 2015 with other cities in North Carolina show mixed results in driving down the amount of homeless individuals statewide. While the amount of chronically homeless individuals decreased in most municipalities, the repercussions of the 2008 recession and a local shortage of affordable housing has stagnated efforts at decreasing the total number of people experiencing some form of homelessness. Statistics gathered from the N.C. Coalition to End Homelessness & the United States Census Bureau

Gimme shelter: In wake of 10-year plan to end homelessne­ss, local agencies regroup

Although chronic homelessness has been curtailed substantially since 2005, the combination of a severe economic downturn, an acute shortage of affordable housing and the rising cost of living has hindered the overall progress in eradicating homelessness. Despite those setbacks, partners in the project are forging ahead with new initiatives to combat housing insecurity and ensure that those in need of shelter get it.

SUNSHINE ON SOULSHINE CT: A warm day in December for the annual Christmas Jam House, "Before the Jam, Lend a Hand" wall raising with Warren Haynes, the homeowners and Habitat for Humanity volunteers.

All smiles: 2015 Christmas Jam house-wall raising

It was an unseasonably warm December afternoon on Soulshine Court in Habitat for Humanity’s Hudson Hills subdivision in West Asheville. A crowd of neighbors, volunteers and fans gathered around the work site for the wall-raising of Habitat’s 2015 Christmas Jam house. For 17 years, Warren Haynes, Asheville native and world renowned musician, has worked closely […]

Pace Burk discusses the River Mill Lofts development during Asheville City Council Meeting

City Council postpones Fairview Road plans, approves Hazel Mill, Thompson Street

After lengthy public hearings, Asheville City Council members passed three controversial requests during a long Tuesday evening meeting Dec. 9. They approved apartment plans for Hazel Mill Road in West Asheville and on Thompson Street and Stoner Road near Biltmore Village but postponed a decision for a Fairview Road plan at the developer’s request. They also adopted changes […]


Oakley residents organize to discuss proposed apartment complex

People in the Oakley community are raising concerns about a new 300-plus-unit apartment complex planned for the East Asheville neighborhood, expressing worries about everything from potential traffic and safety issues to the fact that only 10 of the development’s planned residential units — which are nearly all rental properties — are designated as affordable housing.