Teal Brown, (pictured right) recently started the Wishbone Tiny Homes construction business with his father, Gerry Brown (left). They're also forming a group that will push for changes in local and state rules to accommodate “implementing tiny homes in Asheville." Photo by Carrie Eidson.

Will tiny homes be Asheville’s next big thing?

The blogosphere is abuzz these days with romantic visions of picturesque miniature dwellings. And a growing number of local advocates say the “tiny home movement” could help achieve a wealth of positive outcomes, from environmental efficiencies to enhanced affordability. Amid the swelling interest, however, many hurdles remain.

A roof over one’s head: affordable housing overhaul moves forward

What’s needed to solve Asheville’s housing crunch? Fewer development hurdles, a city “land bank” to preserve property for affordable housing, more density and a hard “target number” for units that need to be created each year— these are some of the ideas to come out of a recent meeting of the Affordable Housing Advisory Committee.

Mold Conundrum: Tenants at Pinnacle Ridge (now known as Hawthorne Northside), an apartment complex near UNC Asheville on Merrimon Avenue, say that problems with mold proved incredibly difficult to solve; city officials say they’re limited in what actions they can take. photos by Max Cooper

Breaking the mold: complaints spotlight Asheville’s rental housing issues

Multiple complaints about mold, rot, and other woes at a Merrimon Avenue apartment complex earlier this year casts doubt on the ability of local governments to deal with what many see as a serious health issue, leaving tenants feeling powerless to get their grievances addressed. And with the Asheville area having some of the highest housing costs in the state and one-third of its working population earning low wages, many local renters face similar issues.