KNOT IN MY CITY: A growing number of Asheville residents and appointed officials are expressing concerns over the city’s current tree ordinances, which they describe as incomplete or not strong enough to protect mature trees like the sycamores cut down at the Country Club of Asheville (above) recently as part of the golf course’s ongoing renovation project. Photo special to Xpress

If a tree falls in the city: Residents push to update Asheville’s tree ordinances

Citizen activists, members of Asheville’s Tree Commission and city officials are exploring the possibility of increased oversight on how trees are managed within the city limits. But with a lack of definition in key parts of the city’s policy, and obstacles at the state level impeding regulations on private property, updating Asheville’s tree ordinances is proving to be an uphill battle.

SHARE THE ROAD: Big changes are on the way for the River Arts District in the coming years, as the city of Asheville and its partners get set to begin a host infrastructure improvements aimed at improving transportation into and around the RAD and upgrading multimodal options for pedestrians and cyclists. Photo by Max Hunt

Road to redevelopm­ent: Big infrastruc­ture upgrades on RAD’s horizon

Asheville’s rustic, arts-and-industry-dominated River Arts District is on the brink of a major transformation. From road realignment, sidewalk construction and expanded bike lanes to an ambitious network of greenways with the RAD as its central hub, substantial changes will be taking place over the next few years that will improve the way residents and visitors to the city access, explore and inhabit the area.

A DAY AT THE RAD: For artists and makers who came to the River Arts District in the late '80s and early '90s, there is a mixed response to the area's growth and the people it attracts.

State of the arts: Where are you going, where have you been?

Ambivalence permeates the River Arts District. For many, its continued growth seems inevitable. Some speak of it with a hint of despair, others address it matter-of-factly. Regardless of who is talking, you can almost hear the inner monologue going on inside their heads — the back-and-forth of what was, what is and what might be.

MAKING SPACE: Residents using Lyman Street and Riverside Drive over the next few months will notice work crews clearing trees and realigning utilities in preparation for construction affliated with the RADTIP project next Spring. Photo by Max Hunt

Cutting to the chase: What’s going on with tree removal in the River Arts District?

Residents commuting down Lyman Street and Riverside Drive have most likely noticed some serious changes to the tree line around 12 Bones. Work crews have been busy removing trees from the area, a project that is expected to continue through the fall. “I’ve been out of office almost 15 years, and I’ve gotten several calls […]

PAINT THE TOWN: Dozens of artists will contribute to a collaborative mural-painting event in the River Arts District this May.

Faces in the crowd: WNC crowdfundi­ng initiative­s

Each week, Xpress highlights notable WNC crowdsourcing initiatives that may inspire readers to become new faces in the crowd. This week features the collaborative project more than 50 mural artists have planned for the River Arts District plus a Burnsville-based family farm’s business expansion.