Inversion and balloons (much better than inverted balloons)

Fall brings many changes to Western North Carolina, from the turning of the leaves to the turning up of the thermostat. These cooler nights mean that many of us are heating our homes with wood-burning stoves and fireplaces to ward off the chill. Most of the time, the wood smoke (along with other particulates that are in the air) mix through much of the lowest layer of our atmosphere, called the troposphere.  But when the air is cool and the winds are calm, we can occasionally see those tiny particles concentrated in the early morning air under what meteorologists call a radiational temperature inversion. Such was the case this morning, as you can see in the image below from Madison County, looking to the southeast across the valley toward the Craggies (image center) and the Blue Ridge Parkway.

Early fall color at the higher elevations

It really is a magical time of the year, as our once deep-green mountainsides begin to show their fall color. The reduced daylight hours have triggered the deciduous trees’ preparation for the coming winter and, at times, it seems like the changes happen so quickly that you can see them occur overnight. I took this image Thursday morning — amazed at just how fast these trees seem to be changing.

Q&A with ADHD coach and therapist: Rudy Rodriguez-attachment0

Q&A with ADHD coach and therapist: Rudy Rodriguez

Local therapist and ADHD coach Rudy Rodriguez will give a free presentation about mindfulness practices for Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) at Malaprop’s Bookstore this Wednesday, June 27, at 7 p.m. Xpress spoke with him to dispel some myths about this disorder that affects an estimated 3 to 7 percent of school-aged children nationwide. (Photo courtesy of Rudy Rodriguez)