The Crowin' Hen

Smart bets: The Crowin’ Hen

“A whistling girl and a crowing hen will never come to any good end,” says local musician and award-winning playwright Tom Godleski, reciting the mountain saying that inspired his latest play. The production, Godleski explains, “blends storytelling and music with mountain traditions of home, family and community,” while following a Western North Carolina family’s plight […]

"The Fox & Beggar Theater is Asheville's answer to Cirque du Soleil, but with a much heavier focus on narrative, poetics and the incredible power of a locally-minded circus theater,” explains Nat Allister, the organization's founder and artistic director. Tarocco: A Soldier's Tale, the theater's forthcoming production, will be performed at the Orange Peel on four weekend nights. Tarocco artwork courtesy of the Fox and Beggar Theater

Faces in the crowd: WNC crowdfundi­ng initiative­s

Each week, Xpress highlights notable WNC crowdsourcing initiatives that may inspire readers to become new faces in the crowd. This week features the Fox and Beggar Theatre’s art fusion production, Noah Proudfoot Stockdale’s musical musings on love, improved resources for the Drum Heads podcast and a traveling documentary and art exhibit about estranged siblings’ visual art.

HOMAGE AND CONTINUATION: The sixth annual {Re}HAPPENING raises funds for the Black Mountain College Museum + Arts Center and honors the legacy of Black Mountain College, which operated from 1933-57. “The goal is to support art that is performance-based or experiential,” says Media Arts Project program director Ursula Gullow. Photo by Michael Oppenheim

All together now: {Re}HAPPEN­ING invades Lake Eden

On a summer evening in 1952, a handful of people at Black Mountain College forever changed the course of modern art with a single performance — the world’s first happening. On Saturday, April 4, the sixth annual {Re}HAPPENING will aspire to recapture that mythic spirit at the long-defunct school’s former grounds at Lake Eden, now the home of Camp Rockmont.

Photo courtesy of Montford Park Players

Theater review: Private Lives

Once upon a time, before the fast-paced world of entertainment we’re accustomed to, there was Noël Coward. His plays were the height of upper crust British humor, depicting high society and often sinking to the lowest depths of humanity (thereby mocking the stereotype). Coward’s style and wit became the forbear of early cinema and the […]