Elitist Bastards: Machete Sunrise

In this week’s Elitist Bastards Go To The Movies, Xpress film critics Ken Hanke and Justin Souther give a half-hearted nod to Going the Distance, heap significant praise on Machete, express ambivalence about The American, applaud Restrepo and appreciate Mao’s Last Dancer on its own schmaltzy terms. They also discuss the classic comedic horror film The Comedy of Terrors (this week’s Thursday Horror Picture Show), and the upcoming Asheville Film Society screening of F.W. Murnau’s Sunrise. And if that wasn’t quite enough, they also reluctantly discuss this week’s opening films Resident Evil: Afterlife 3D and The Virginity Hit.

Podcast produced/cohered by Steve Shanafelt for MountainX.com. The theme music is “1832” by E. Lee. The Elitist Bastards podcast is also available on the iTunes store as a free download. Click here to join the Elitist Bastards Facebook fan page.

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9 thoughts on “Elitist Bastards: Machete Sunrise

  1. Ken Hanke

    We are simian challenged this week and I am chagrined. Yes, chagrined.

  2. My sincerest apple loagies. I missed the deadline by a matter of minutes. I promise reparations for next week and I will waive my banana.

  3. Ken Hanke

    and I will waive my banana.

    At first, I did not notice the “i” in waive. I was alarmed.

  4. Dionysis

    Off topic completely, but what is the film scheduled for next Thursday’s horror programming? I am trying to actually make it to at least one of these showings, and next Thursday is my target.

  5. Ken Hanke

    Off topic completely

    Is that possible in this case?

    what is the film scheduled for next Thursday’s horror programming? I am trying to actually make it to at least one of these showings, and next Thursday is my target

    Thusday, Sept. 16 is a double bill of Universal 1940s B horrors — Man Made Monster and Night Monster.

  6. Ken Hanke

    On the bright side, we have next week’s primate picture prepped.

    True enough, but it’s a little shy on simians.

  7. Dionysis

    “Thusday, Sept. 16 is a double bill of Universal 1940s B horrors—Man Made Monster and Night Monster.”

    Thank you. I saw the first title so long ago I’ve forgotten it, and I don’t believe I’ve seen Night Monster.

  8. Ken Hanke

    I saw the first title so long ago I’ve forgotten it, and I don’t believe I’ve seen Night Monster.

    Good! Neither is a great film, though a case can be made that they’re great examples of a type of horror film. Man Made Monster (at a brisk 59 minutes!) is essentially the template for all 1940s Universal horrors — slick, fast-moving, glossy and none-too-cerebral. Actually, I prefer it by a wide margin to The Wolf Man, which it paved the way for with Chaney, Jr. Night Monster is over-the-top old dark house stuff with actual supernatural trimmings, but it usually gets short shrift for wasting top-billed Bela Lugosi (and it does) in butler role. Get past that, and it’s a fun horror opus.

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