GET UP AND DANCE: Asheville City School's director of human resources Mark Dickerson, aka "Dr. DJ Mark," dances with students during this year's anti-bullying rally. Photo courtesy of Asheville City Schools

Buncombe County schools teach strategies­, raise awareness about cyberbully­ing

Cyberbullying is an issue that comes up all too often. It can include any type of intimidation with electronics or internet use, from texting to posting on social media. Research shows that it has doubled among middle and high schoolers in the U.S. from 2007 to 2016 — from 18 to 34 percent. But research also shows that North Carolina has the second lowest rate of cyberbullying — 30 percent, higher only than Massachusetts at 23 percent. Since October is National Bullying Prevention Month, Asheville City Schools held a rally to create awareness of the issue.

ONE FOR ALL AND ALL FOR ONE: The Rev. Mack Dennis, Jackie Simms, Yousuf Ben Omran, Dr. Stephen Wall, and John Grant, left to right, speak at the "Healthcare for All - A Moral Obligation?" symposium. Photo by Jameson O'Hanlon

Spiritual leaders discuss moral obligation­s at Healthcare for All symposium

Local leaders weighed in on the issue of universal health care in a multifaith, nonpartisan symposium, “Healthcare for All: A Moral Obligation?” on Oct. 12 at First Baptist Church of Asheville. All of the speakers advocated for a single-payer system. Frank L. Fox, chair of the publicity and outreach committee of Healthcare for All — […]

ROLLING ALONG: The 11th annual Tour de Pumpkin on Oct. 7 will let cyclists enjoy the countryside around Rutherfordton with tour distances of 50 or 100 kilometers. The ride is one of several cycling events that celebrate the crisp weather and brilliant colors of autumn. Photo courtesy of the Tour de Pumpkin

ICYMI: Xpress stories from the issue of Sept. 27, 2017

From the area’s largest single construction project to fall planting, Xpress has the scoop on local fall happenings. Here are some of our best stories from the previous week to keep you reading as you wait for our next issue, coming to a paper box near you on Wednesday, Oct. 4.

STUNNING REVERSAL: Jesse Smathers of Vaya Health, right, shows Gov. Roy Cooper how to assemble a Narcan kit during Cooper's recent visit to the agency's administrative office. Narcan reverses the effects of opiate overdose. Photo by Leslie Boyd

Asheville agencies address complexiti­es of opioid addiction and treatment

Health and law enforcement officials in North Carolina are trying to deal with an epidemic of opioid addiction, and they’re moving away from criminal prosecution for substance use disorders. Instead, the newer model is to coordinate care across the divide between physical and behavioral health “silos” (separate areas of service provision).

Goldenseal, a popular forest farming crop, is grown for medicinal use. Photo courtesy of Appalachian Beginning Forest Farmers Coalition

Workshop shares knowledge for raising crops on the forest floor

Many cultures around the world cultivate native, shade-loving plants beneath the forest canopy. Recently, more farmers in the United States have been getting excited about the potential of forest farming to diversify their crops while preserving natural environments. A forest farming workshop on Saturday, Sept. 30 and Sunday, Oct. 1, is geared to farmers of all levels who are interested in growing in the shade.

Image courtesy of Rooted in the Mountains

Rooted in the Mountains conference will integrate Western and Cherokee ideas

“Rooted in the Mountains,” a conference that explores the intersection of Western and native traditions that’s now in its eighth year, will take place at Western Carolina University on Thursday and Friday, Sept. 28-29, and includes a trip to the sacred site of Kituwah, the Cherokee “mother town.”