Cranky Hanke’s Screening Room: A Couple Quick Musings and the Suggestion Box

Owing to circumstances over which nobody has any control, this week’s Screening Room will be of the short variety—and I mean it this time. Yeah, I know you’ve heard that before and then my natural tendency to subscribe to the immortal words of the equally immortal Mantan Moreland, “Can I help it ‘cause I’m loquacious?” takes over. (Bonus points for anyone who can identify just where he said this—and I offer two clues: the photo to the right and the fact that the divine Madame Sul-Te-Wan is in the same movie.) But that simply cannot be this round, owing to a packed reviewing schedule and the fact that no one has yet managed to invent the 48-hour-day, which I think is lax in the extreme. Haven’t we been using the 24 hour model quite long enough by now?

First of all, it’s with mixed emotions that I announce the end of an era. As a horror movie completist—at least in terms of English language films—there is nothing I won’t watch at least once. This includes comedy horror pictures and spoofs of all sorts. I even freely admit to actually liking such things as You’ll Find Out (1940), Spooks Run Wild (1941) and the irresistibly titled Zombies on Broadway (1945). So, of course, I just had to see The Bowery Boys Meet the Monsters (1954) when it finally crossed my path last Saturday. My God, I wish I hadn’t. First of all let’s define “the Monsters,” which in this case means a sort of vampire woman, a man in a gorilla suit, a man-eating plant (which manages to be both hokey and strangely obscene-looking), some brief nonsense involving Huntz Hall and a Jekyll and Hyde potion, and a robot that six-year-olds would be embarassed to have created. The upside is there are no further Bowery Boys movies I feel compelled to check out—ever.

This past Tuesday the Asheville Film Society ran Charlie Kaufman’s Synecdoche, New York (2008). The audience response was interesting to say the least. I don’t believe anyone walked out, which kind of surprised me, but it was clear from comments that it fascinated some, appalled others and even angered a few—and by that last I mean the film itself angered them, not that they were angered by it being shown. One gentleman even forthrightly opined that he got the feeling that Kaufman thought we—the audience—were all “assholes,” which was without a doubt the strongest negative reaction.

Though I’ve seen the film a couple times via DVD on television, this was only the third time I’d seen it on a screen and with a group of people—and each of those three times has provoked a very different response from me. When I first saw it in 2008, I found Synecdoche a peculiarly uplifting experience—and that’s an against all odds occurence, since there are some pretty grim things in the movie. The second time it struck me as a very funny black comedy. And this time? Frankly, it depressed the hell out of me. I still saw the other things I’d seen the first two times, but depression was my overall feeling. Any movie that can prompt such diverse reactions has to be doing something very right indeed. I’ll be curious to see what happens the fourth such go around, but I’m not anxious to find out any time soon. In fact, I’m very glad that we’re running an uncomplicated comedy this week.

That, in its own way, brings me to the Suggestion Box aspect of this week’s column. And in that regard, I’m meeting all comers—and on all fronts. This, of course, stops short of suggestions involving a stout piece of rope and instructions in its use.

I’m opening the floor to suggestions various and sundry for movies that ought to given serious consideration for inclusion in both the Asheville Film Society and Thursday Horror Picture Show screenings. Some of our most successful showings—The Fall (2006) and Blue Velvet (1986), come immediately to mind—have been the result of suggestions. In the Thursday Horror Picture Show realm, both Bad Taste (1987) and Phenomena (1985) came from suggestions. Right now, the only ironclad suggestion I’ve been given is Werner Herzog’s Fitzcarraldo (1982). That doesn’t mean that no one has mentioned anything else to me in passing—and if you have, this is the place to remind me.

Of course, November is already booked and at least two AFS film for December, but otherwise I’m pretty much open to ideas. I’d particularly be interested in suggestions for a proper—or even improper—Christmas horror picture. I know what the obvious choice is, but maybe I’m overlooking something and hopefully someone might point out what that something is. But don’t delay in suggestions since it might be a title that isn’t at hand and will need ordering from an outside source.

There are literally hundreds of movies that probably should be run—far more than we’ll ever work our way through at one or two a week. Do keep in mind that not everything that should be run is available. I remain completely perplexed just why Stephen Frears’ Sammy and Rosie Get Laid (1987) hasn’t seen a release since the days of laserdisc. (I check every so often.) And don’t even get me started on the missing Ken Russell titles. Someone requested Yellow Submarine (1968) the other night and I’d be way cool with that—except the long out of print DVD isn’t anamorphically enhanced and that poses a problem. So bear that sort of thing in mind when making suggestions.

And while we’re at it, I wouldn’t in the least mind the odd suggestion for a Screening Room. Some weeks it’s harder than you might think coming up with a topic. Don’t make me threaten you with a dissertation on the social ramifications of Dean Martin and Jerry Lewis.

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About Ken Hanke
Head film critic for Mountain Xpress from December 2000 until his death in June 2016. Author of books "Ken Russell's Films," "Charlie Chan at the Movies," "A Critical Guide to Horror Film Series," "Tim Burton: An Unauthorized Biography of the Filmmaker."

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53 thoughts on “Cranky Hanke’s Screening Room: A Couple Quick Musings and the Suggestion Box

  1. Bert

    Did you know that Yoko and Paul have blocked the dvd of “Let It Be” from ever being released because it shows them fighting?

  2. Ken Hanke

    Did you know that Yoko and Paul have blocked the dvd of “Let It Be” from ever being released because it shows them fighting?

    I know there are rumors about the release being blocked, but I thought it was because it shows Paul and George fighting and/or because it shows John being bored to death listening to Paul pontificate about the film they’re making. I can’t actually think of a scene in the film where Paul and Yoko interact much at all, much less one where they fight.

  3. Couple-o-Sky

    Does it irritate others, as it does me a little, when writers say “a couple” without “of” immediately following, as it this headline, “A Couple Quick Musings….” This omission of “of” has become more common recently, and I don’t know that it’s considered bad grammar. Maybe “a couple” means “two” but my ear still wants to hear “of” after. I realize Ken may not have written the headline, and even if he did, I’m just asking.

  4. Dionysis

    A few titles to consider for Thursday night showings:

    War of the Worlds (the 2006 Pendragon Studios version). While not a great movie, it is set in 1897-8, true to Wells’ book.

    Scanners and/or Shivers, two early Cronenberg titles.

    The Unearthly (maybe paired with another title)

    In the Mouth of Madness (one of Carpenter’s best!)

    Mr. Sardonicus (one of William Castle’s better films).

  5. Ken Hanke

    I realize Ken may not have written the headline, and even if he did, I’m just asking.

    No, I’m responsible and though I’m often charged with being a grammar and a spelling Nazi, it’s not something that bothers me. It’s 50-50 how I say it — with an edge toward not in this case where I’m trying to keep the heading reasonably short.

  6. Ken Hanke

    These films are being shown for free. I say keep challenging people.

    Up to a point that’s reasonable, but it becomes pointless if no one shows up. I find it better to provide a mix — though I’m willing to bet there are those who will find the prospect of Little Miss Marker more daunting than Synecdoche, New York.

    At the same time, I don’t always guess these things very well. If you told me beforehand that we’d have people sitting in the floor watching Women on the Verge of a Nervous Breakdown, I’d’ve said you were nuts.

  7. Ken Hanke

    War of the Worlds (the 2006 Pendragon Studios version). While not a great movie, it is set in 1897-8, true to Wells’ book.

    Scanners and/or Shivers, two early Cronenberg titles.

    The Unearthly (maybe paired with another title)

    In the Mouth of Madness (one of Carpenter’s best!)

    Mr. Sardonicus (one of William Castle’s better films).

    I’m actually leaning toward The Brood for our next bout of Cronenberg. I haven’t seen that War of the Worlds. The Unearthly is an interesting suggestion, though I remember being disappointed when I finally caught up with it post-childhood. It might pair okay with The Alligator People — if they’re both available.

    Calling something “one of Carpenter’s best” is really, really faint praise for me. I saw In the Mouth once and don’t remember liking it much, but I’d be willing to give it another try.

    I’m leaning toward The Tingler for a dose of Wm. Castle. Sardonicus, however, is worth considering.

  8. Jessamyn

    Couple-o-sky, I’m with you. ‘A couple’ does mean two, but in the same way ‘a pair’ does – you wouldn’t say ‘a pair books’ and you shouldn’t say ‘a couple books.’ But I usually avoid such subjects, since (as a former editor) I should never be allowed to get going on misusages. At least with Mr. Hanke we are free of such Spellcheck Generation agonies as ‘in tack’ for ‘intact’ and the like.

    I won’t make any film suggestions since I don’t get out in the evenings much and when I do it’s to dance, not sit, but I keep coming back here because I enjoy the discussions and despite his faulty stance on ‘couple,’ Mr. Hanke is always thoughtful and informative and I invariably learn something.

  9. Chip Kaufmann

    Here are a few suggestions for films.

    THURSDAY HORROR PICTURE SHOW….Polanski’s MACBETH / THE HAUNTED PALACE / THE CHANGELING (there should be at least one real ghost story)/ Bava’s BLACK SUNDAY. (I also have a quality copy of THE UNEARTHLY and THE ALLIGATOR PEOPLE is on DVD but there’s always THE GIANT CLAW)…..

    Tuesday AFS….Chaplin’s THE CIRCUS (you have yet to show a silent comedy) / THE KING OF MASKS / THE MAN IN THE GLASS BOOTH (American Film Theater) / MY LIFE AS A DOG.

    I would like to see more “golden decade” films (1968-1977) at AFS as well as a few Top 100 films which are talked and written about but rarely seen. A few more foreign films would be nice as well.

  10. War of the Worlds (the 2006 Pendragon Studios version). While not a great movie, it is set in 1897-8, true to Wells’ book.
    That strikes me as the opposite of relative criteria for judging a film.

  11. Dionysis

    “I haven’t seen that War of the Worlds. The Unearthly is an interesting suggestion, though I remember being disappointed when I finally caught up with it post-childhood. It might pair okay with The Alligator People—if they’re both available.”

    I have all of these titles if you wish to borrow them. The Unearthly to me is similar to ‘The Black Sleep’ (mutants in the dungeon).

  12. Dionysis

    “That strikes me as the opposite of relative criteria for judging a film.”

    That’s fine. There are as many opinions out there as there are people; I personally like the premise of a technologically incipient world having to contend with an alien invasion. Just out of curiousity, have you actually seen it?

  13. Dionysis

    “In the Mouth of Madness (one of Carpenter’s best!)

    ew

    Regardless, I like it.

  14. DrSerizawa

    The Christmas themed horror movies I’ve seen are pretty much all slashers, except maybe Billy Bob Thornton’s “Bad Santa” which was a true horror. Though “Santa’s Slay” from 2005 has a bit of a different take with Santa being a Norse god and the son of Satan and is more of a black comedy.

    Even though it’s Korean and subtitled (not a problem for me) Joon-Hwan Jang’s “Save The Green Planet” impressed me quite a bit as something different. Not for the squeamish though.

    Or maybe some euro-horror with Barbara Steele. “Castle of Blood”. Or “Black Sunday.”

    A more recent and fairly decent rendition of HP Lovecraft is “Dagon”. A Spanish production as I recall.

    Also amongst my favorites are those Corman/Price collaborations. “Fall of the House of Usher”, “Pit and the Pendulum” or “The Raven.” Excellent examples of how much can be done on a minimal budget.

    Did you know that Yoko and Paul have blocked the dvd of “Let It Be” from ever being released because it shows them fighting?

    Not to worry. When Paul and Yoko pass on it’ll be released. Trust me. The estate holders will see to that. Cha-ching!

  15. DrSerizawa

    P.S. The new rendition of “Metropolis” last night on TCM was just as enthralling as ever. You dogs who got to see it on the big screen…. damn you to hell! How it could bore anyone is a total mystery. A lot of today’s actors could cure their stone-face performances by trying their hands at silent acting. Fat chance.

  16. Dionysis

    “A more recent and fairly decent rendition of HP Lovecraft is “Dagon”. A Spanish production as I recall.”

    You’re right, it was filmed and set in Spain. It does a pretty good job of creating the weird atmosphere that Lovecraft depicted, with slithering, tentacled things just on the periphery and not-quite-human characters. I only thought the ending was weak. By the way, this movie was not based upon Lovecraft’s story ‘Dagon’ but rather ‘The Shadow over Innsmouth’ instead.

  17. Lauren

    Yes, I missed Metropolis as well. Would be great for another opportunity to see restored version properly!
    Or any other Lang…

  18. Dread P. Roberts

    The new rendition of “Metropolis” last night on TCM was just as enthralling as ever. You dogs who got to see it on the big screen…. damn you to hell! How it could bore anyone is a total mystery.

    Oh, I can assure you, it was quite special to see on the big screen. Very impressive. (Yes, I’m a sick bastard, who derives pleasure from rubbing it in.)

    To be honest, I went in thinking that the extra running time might consist of a lot of padding; which could invariably make the proceedings a little bit slower paced. But that wasn’t the case whatsoever. It was everybit as engaging. Actually, despite the poor print(s), I thought it was even more engaging overall. Metropolis should’ve never been cut.

  19. Son of Rufus

    In regards to suggestions, let’s say hypothetically that someone enjoyed exploring the horror genre using the showings from the Thursday Horror Picture Show as a template. But this person doesn’t live in Asheville so they have to use Netflix. Is there a reliable place to see what will be shown next week instead of just hoping you post something on Facebook?

    I’m often charged with being a grammar and a spelling Nazi

    In this regard, what is the protocol for letting you know that you have a grammar error in your article? Or do you even want to know (second to last paragraph, second sentence)?

  20. Ken Hanke

    I would like to see more “golden decade” films (1968-1977) at AFS as well as a few Top 100 films which are talked and written about but rarely seen. A few more foreign films would be nice as well.

    A little specificity.

  21. Ken Hanke

    I have all of these titles if you wish to borrow them. The Unearthly to me is similar to ‘The Black Sleep’ (mutants in the dungeon).

    I’ll keep you apprised. It might be easier to get them from Chip, whom I see regularly, but it might serve to drag you out of a Thursday night! I do remember that The Unearthly is at least better than The Black Sleep!

  22. Ken Hanke

    Though “Santa’s Slay” from 2005 has a bit of a different take with Santa being a Norse god and the son of Satan and is more of a black comedy.

    Now that sounds kind of interesting!

    A more recent and fairly decent rendition of HP Lovecraft is “Dagon”. A Spanish production as I recall

    It was in fact made by Stuart Gordon.

  23. Ken Hanke

    Yes, I missed Metropolis as well. Would be great for another opportunity to see restored version properly!
    Or any other Lang…

    A little soon for Metropolis again — and, for that matter, the DVD is not out yet. I saw Spies last night on TCM and was much impressed — a lot more than I had been when I saw it 30-odd years ago (I think there was a lot less of it to see at that time). The only downside is that I really, really detested the musical track that’s been attached to it. It’s like a compendium of everything I don’t like about music tracks on silents.

  24. Ken Hanke

    Oh, I can assure you, it was quite special to see on the big screen. Very impressive.

    Actually, I’m glad to hear that. This is, I believe, the first you’ve remarked on it since the screening and I’d wondered if you’d been disappointed.

  25. Ken Hanke

    In regards to suggestions, let’s say hypothetically that someone enjoyed exploring the horror genre using the showings from the Thursday Horror Picture Show as a template. But this person doesn’t live in Asheville so they have to use Netflix. Is there a reliable place to see what will be shown next week instead of just hoping you post something on Facebook?

    I’ll see what can be done about that. Here’s the rest of November —

    Nosferatu (F.W. Murnau, 1922) — Nov. 11

    Werewolf of London (Stuart Walker, 1935) — Nov. 18

    Bride of the Monster (Ed Wood, 1955), The Devil Bat (Jean Yarbrough, 1940) — Nov. 25

    In this regard, what is the protocol for letting you know that you have a grammar error in your article? Or do you even want to know (second to last paragraph, second sentence)?

    Just tell me, though I’m not sure I’d call mistyping “is” as “in” exactly an error of grammar — more like typing when I ought to have been sleeping. Anyway, I’ve fixed it.

  26. Tonberry

    I’d particularly be interested in suggestions for a proper—or even improper—Christmas horror picture. I know what the obvious choice is

    That’s “Gremlins,” right?

  27. Bert

    I didn’t mean Paul and Yoko specifically fighting, but the Beatles themselves. And the Beatles marketing apparatus would like to cover up the animosity that led to their breakup.

    Someday I’ll find a bootleg copy, I suppose. My brother in law says the studio stuff is boring; it only gets good when they do the rooftop concert.

  28. A little soon for Metropolis again—and, for that matter, the DVD is not out yet

    Next Tuesday. On blu-ray too!

  29. Ken Hanke

    I didn’t mean Paul and Yoko specifically fighting, but the Beatles themselves. And the Beatles marketing apparatus would like to cover up the animosity that led to their breakup.

    I still question this. It sounds more like somebody stating their suspicion as to why the film isn’t out as fact. I mean really with God knows how many books detailing the break-up and worse, there’s no chance of a cover-up at this date. Also, you simply don’t see the Beatles fighting. That’s a myth. You see Paul and George have an argument — and a very quiet one. (It’s basically George saying, “I can play it that way or I can play it my way or I can not play it at all. Whatever it is that’ll make you happy, I’ll do.”) You see Paul bore the living Jesus out of John, but no fighting. If memory serves — though the film records none of this — the only one who actually walked out during the filming was, surprisingly, Ringo.

    Another very probable factor in it not being out is a lot of the studio footage is dark and grainy and looks like crap.

    Someday I’ll find a bootleg copy, I suppose. My brother in law says the studio stuff is boring; it only gets good when they do the rooftop concert.

    It can’t be that hard to find a copy, since it was released on VHS. I need to borrow the VHS from a friend in Florida and copy it to DVD-R, I suppose. Boring is a pretty good word to describe long stretches of the film, but it depends on how hardcore a fan you are. Boring didn’t keep three friends and me from seeing it five times back in 1970. The rooftop concert makes up for much (the movie’s only 80 or 85 minutes) — and there’s Paul doing “Long and Winding Road” sans Spectorized choir, a nice bit of George’s “I Me Mine” with John and Yoko waltzing to it, a long version of “Dig It,” and a few other things. I can’t at the moment recall if “The Two of Us” is performed in the studio or if that was just shown on Ed Sullivan.

  30. DrSerizawa

    Oh how could I forget this. Have you shown “The Tingler” yet? Can’t have horror movies without working in “The Tingler”.

  31. Dread P. Roberts

    I’m glad to hear that. This is, I believe, the first you’ve remarked on it since the screening and I’d wondered if you’d been disappointed.

    Yes, my wife and I both absolutely loved it. She had never seen it before (something that I’d been meaning to rectify for awhile) and was very happy with the final product. I would’ve liked to have stayed for a bit afterwards, but we were in somewhat of a hurry to catch a second feature. (We strive to take full advantage of grandparents babysitting on Halloween weekend.) Our timing to the second film was impeccable – we walked into the screening the instant the movie started.

    I’d particularly be interested in suggestions for a proper—or even improper—Christmas horror picture. I know what the obvious choice is

    That’s “Gremlins,” right?

    The first thing that came to my mind was The Nightmare Before Christmas… that’s essential holiday viewing in our household. I’ve actually seen it on the big screen four times; two of which were in really nice 3-D.

  32. DrSerizawa

    Theatre of Blood.

    Blood on Satan’s Claw.

    Fearless Vampire Hunters.

    Planet of the Vampires.

    The Terror.

    Horror Express. (A personal favorite)

    (Help me, I can’t stop.)

  33. I’m kind of unqualified to comment, because I only made it once (to see the Mae West double feature).
    I loved “Synecdoche, New York” and thought it had the perfect ending (I remember the last few minutes thinking that was the way it had to end but wasn’t going to), but I see most things on the dark comedy level. I’m all up for challenging those guys! Show “Naked” and “Happiness” as a double feature and play Leonard Cohen in between!

    For Christmas horror: “Jack Frost” (not the Michael Keaton one, the Shannon Elizabeth one) is hysterical.

    I guess you need to decide on a direction for the Tuesday series – is it going to be introducing people to cinema they aren’t likely to see, or reconnecting with classics? I’d be more likely to go to fill in holes in my viewing experience – I’ve not seen much Kurosawa besides the obvious (“Seven Samurai”, “Ran”) and would be interested in seeing more. There’s scads of classic comedy seen by very few – a W.C. Fields double feature (say “The Bank Dick” and “The Old Fashioned Way”) would be highly entertaining.

    And how about shocking some audiences – here’s my short list
    “Head”
    “Beyond the Valley of the Dolls” (or any Russ Meyer you think you can show – “Up” maybe?)
    “Alfie” (the original)
    “The Butcher Boy”
    “The City of Lost Children”
    Any Peter Greenaway you think you could get away with – I’ve only seen “A Zed and Two Naughts” and “The Baby of Macon” and his TV version of “The Divine Comedy”
    “Love and Human Remains”
    “Totally F***ed Up” (it would give me much pleasure to see how those who reacted viscerally to Kaufman do to Gregg Araki).

  34. Ken Hanke

    There is a NTSC, region 1 ‘collector’s edition’ of Let It Be listed on Amazon UK, but not Amazon U.S. This is a different release than the bootleg that’s been floating around for years. It indicates that is it in 16:9 aspect ratio.

    Interesting. You’ll notice it’s be sold on, but not by Amazon. Might be worth risking the $30-40 to find out what it is.

  35. Ken Hanke

    The first thing that came to my mind was The Nightmare Before Christmas… that’s essential holiday viewing in our household.

    I begin to think that Bob Clark’s Black Christmas isn’t as obvious a choice as I thought!

  36. Dionysis

    “Interesting. You’ll notice it’s be sold on, but not by Amazon. Might be worth risking the $30-40 to find out what it is.”

    I’ve tried ordering DVDs from independent sellers linked to Amazon UK before, but found they won’t ship to the U.S. There are two venders listed as having Let It Be, but I cannot see where they offer shipping beyond Europe. Oh well, I have some friends in the U.K. that I might be able to convince to buy on my behalf and ship over. I sent them a load of goodies from Earth Fare before, so reciprocity seems fair.

  37. kimboronni

    I might get it for this, but I second tonberry: Gremlins is the first thing I thought of! I would totally go to see it on the big screen.

    One suggestion for Tuesdays: Pee Wee’s Big Adventure. It’s one of my favorite Burton films!!!

  38. kimboronni

    Also for Tuesday: Bergman’s Persona. It’s so Mulholland Drive, and would really get folks’ brains cooking! The people that show up to screenings seem open to a challenge, and I think the audience has the patience for sub-titles.

  39. Ken Hanke

    I’m kind of unqualified to comment

    This is internet, so that doesn’t apply.

    I guess you need to decide on a direction for the Tuesday series – is it going to be introducing people to cinema they aren’t likely to see, or reconnecting with classics?

    I don’t see why it can’t do both. Of course, that’s kind of what we’ve been trying. And for far too many people it’s not reconnecting with the classics, it’s connecting with them for the first time.

    There’s scads of classic comedy seen by very few – a W.C. Fields double feature (say “The Bank Dick” and “The Old Fashioned Way”) would be highly entertaining.

    Some of that’s already on the agenda.

    And how about shocking some audiences – here’s my short list
    “Head”
    “Beyond the Valley of the Dolls” (or any Russ Meyer you think you can show – “Up” maybe?)
    “Alfie” (the original)
    “The Butcher Boy”
    “The City of Lost Children”
    Any Peter Greenaway you think you could get away with – I’ve only seen “A Zed and Two Naughts” and “The Baby of Macon” and his TV version of “The Divine Comedy”
    “Love and Human Remains”

    Some of that’s planned, though I have to say I just don’t “get” Russ Meyer. We did run City of Lost Children. The Butcher Boy is definitely happening. So little Greenaway is on DVD that he presents a problem — and my Zed and Two Noughts disappeared when it was out on loan. I do have The Pillow Book, which rates high with folks who like seeing Ewan McGregor’s willy. Love and Human Remains hadn’t made it to DVD last I checked.

  40. Ken Hanke

    I’ve tried ordering DVDs from independent sellers linked to Amazon UK before, but found they won’t ship to the U.S. There are two venders listed as having Let It Be, but I cannot see where they offer shipping beyond Europe.

    It seemed to indicate the first one did, but not express. Anyway, a price was listed (6.40, which is steep if it’s pounds sterling!) on the Amazon site itself.

  41. Ken Hanke

    I might get it for this, but I second tonberry: Gremlins is the first thing I thought of! I would totally go to see it on the big screen.

    I don’t see any reason you’d “get it” for that suggestion. I can’t say I care for it much myself, but that doesn’t rule it out. I think it might be a little light for the THPS crowd, but maybe not.

    One suggestion for Tuesdays: Pee Wee’s Big Adventure. It’s one of my favorite Burton films!!!

    It’ll likely happen at some point.

    Also for Tuesday: Bergman’s Persona.

    Also very likely.

  42. Great discussion here, but I’m surprised nobody tried for your bonus points re KING OF THE ZOMBIES (more likely the crowd of cinephiles here noted the obvious in passing and felt that there was little point in mentioning it).

    I’m mildly disappointed only because at first I thought this might be a MANTAN MANDATE piece or some such. If I were in the area and someone programmed such, I’d attend (moot since I’m in El Paso, but).

  43. Ken Hanke

    Great discussion here, but I’m surprised nobody tried for your bonus points re KING OF THE ZOMBIES

    Well, since no one did, then you clearly win them.

  44. Son of Rufus

    I’ll see what can be done about that. Here’s the rest of November—

    Nosferatu (F.W. Murnau, 1922)—Nov. 11

    Werewolf of London (Stuart Walker, 1935)—Nov. 18

    Bride of the Monster (Ed Wood, 1955), The Devil Bat (Jean Yarbrough, 1940)—Nov. 25

    Thanks, I’ll check those out.

    Just tell me, though I’m not sure I’d call mistyping “is” as “in” exactly an error of grammar—more like typing when I ought to have been sleeping. Anyway, I’ve fixed it.

    I agree. Just helping you attain the perfection I’m sure you strive for.

  45. Ken Hanke

    Thanks, I’ll check those out.

    Keep in mind that Bride of the Monster and The Devil Bat were chosen as our Thanksgiving turkeys. Now, I like both movies — not exactly for the right reasons, though.

  46. Bert

    From Wikipedia:

    “An anonymous industry source told the Daily Express in July 2008 that, according to Apple insiders, McCartney and Starr blocked the release of the film on DVD. The two were concerned about the effect on the band’s “global brand … if the public sees the darker side of the story. Neither Paul nor Ringo would feel comfortable publicising a film showing The Beatles getting on each other’s nerves … There’s all sorts of extra footage showing more squabbles but it’s unlikely it will ever see the light of day in Paul and Ringo’s lifetime.”[41] However, Apple has since confirmed that restoration work on the film has begun for future DVD release, but a definitive issue date has yet to be determined.”

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Let_It_Be_(film)

    I would wager we will see Let It Be come out on dvd and blueray before Disney lets Song of the South out of the vault hahahahaha

  47. Ken Hanke

    An anonymous industry source told the Daily Express in July 2008 that, according to Apple insiders

    Surely, I cannot be the only person who finds the credibility factor lacking in this!

    I would wager we will see Let It Be come out on dvd and blueray before Disney lets Song of the South out of the vault

    Now, that I don’t doubt. The odd thing is, if either become generally available, the biggest likely response is going to be disappointment.

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