WASTE WATCHERS: Largely unheralded, the Buncombe County Metropolitan Sewerage District ensures that the waste generated by its approximately 130,000 customers is properly treated and disposed of before it enters local waterways. The agency is currently in the midst of a $266 million capital improvement project that will upgrade its plant facilities for the future. Photo courtesy of MSD

MSD upgrades its infrastruc­ture with capital improvemen­t projects

To fulfill its critical mission and increase its capacity to deal with a growing service area and customer base, MSD is in the midst of a $266 million capital improvement project, which will help ensure that the community’s waste is properly handled and safely disposed of.

IN THE BEGINNING: Reputed to be the third oldest river in the world, the French Broad has gone from a polluted industrial dumping ground to a key cog in Western North Carolina’s outdoor and tourism industries. This renaissance is a result of government, nonprofit, and individual efforts to improve water quality throughout the watershed. Photo by Mike Belleme; courtesy of Transylvania Chamber of Commerce & Tourism Development Authority

Communitie­s along Upper French Broad work to restore water quality

In this two-part series, Xpress invites you on a guided a trip down the river as we examine the work of various communities to write the next chapter in the French Broad’s history, beginning with Transylvania and Henderson counties.

BEFORE THE DEMOLITION: Architect Anthony Lord took this picture of Valley and Eagle streets before many of the surrounding homes and businesses were torn down. Stephens-Lee High School and Gymnasium are visible on the left. According to the N.C. Collection at Pack Library, it is believed these photos were taken  as part of the planning for the area's "revitalization."

Tuesday History: Before and after the East Riverside Urban Renewal Project

Conversations about the East Riverside Urban Renewal Project began in the mid-1960s. The project’s goal was to provide more public housing in Asheville. It wouldn’t be until 1977 that the plan would go into effect. The government-funded project sought to build 1,300 new homes on 425 acres. However, in order to accomplish this, many residents […]

OLD SCHOOL: ON July 25, UNC Asheville Assistant Professor of History Darin Waters will present a lecture on the history of African-American education in Asheville as part of the Lunch and Learn Lecture Series sponsored by Buncombe County. Image courtesy of UNC Asheville

Lunch and Learn Lecture Series hosts second talk

On Tuesday, July 25, Darin Waters will offer a lecture on the history of African-American education in Asheville and Western North Carolina as part of the Buncombe County Lunch and Learn Lecture Series, hosted by the county’s Department of Health and Human Services. The free event will run noon-1:30 p.m. at Stephens-Lee Recreation Center, 30 George Washington Carver Ave. in Asheville.