ICYMI: Xpress feature reads from the week

Lindley Mayer as "Jenny" represents the voice of hope in a new WNC film called Sangria Lift. Read more in Alli Marshall's story "Lift Off."

Looking for some longform (or longerform) reads to cozy up with over the weekend? Here’s a round-up of our leading feature stories from the last seven days. Happy reading!

Art

Parallel Lives PR  #1
Two-woman show Parallel Lives brings another season of professional theater to a conclusion for North Carolina Stage Co.

Theater Review: “Parallel Lives” at NC Stage
By Jeff Messer

Heavy on the sketch comedy formula, the show is a series of vignettes depicting the lives of the modern woman — the characters range from starry-eyed teens to sisters managing the funeral of their grandmother. The show alternates from side-splittingly funny to emotionally resonant. (Continue reading)
 
 
Author Megan Shepherd launches one series and sells another
Doug Gibson

Brevard native and best-selling YA novelist Megan Shepherd, the author of the Victorian Gothic Madman’s Daughter series, recently announced that she had sold The Secret Horses of Briar Hill, a middle-grade fantasy in the vein of The Secret Garden. The book had sold at auction, meaning that editors at several publishing houses bid for the chance to take it on. (Continue reading)
 

IN THE SWIM: Young dancers wear human clothes and foam heads to portray ocean creatures in The Mystery of the Seahorse. The production deals with themes of ecology, community and good versus evil.
Young dancers wear human clothes and foam heads to portray ocean creatures in The Mystery of the Seahorse.

Lift off: WNC-based filmmaker Melanie Scot sends “Sangria Lift” to festivals
By Alli Marshall

The story follows a car named Sangria that is stolen for fun by a group of teens. But even though some of the film’s characters surmise the car will be found, stripped and up on blocks somewhere, what actually happens is wholly unexpected. And it’s based on a true story. (Continue reading)
 
 
ACDT stages ecological-themed Mystery of the Seahorse
By Regina Cherene

When a mysterious sickness surfaces and sea horses begin to disappear, a colorful crew of aquatic fauna must band together to identify and tackle the problem. It’s not the newest PBS Kids series; it’s The Mystery of the Seahorse, an archetypal tale of good versus evil set in Australia’s Great Barrier Reef. It’s also the latest production from Asheville Contemporary Dance Theatre. (Continue reading)


Food

LABELED: Local beer needs local designs — Asheville-based Woolly Press handles the look and branding for such breweries as Fonta Flora, which gets its work done on a Risograph, a machine popular in the 1980s. Pictured are Mica Mead, left, and Colin Sutherland, right, of Woolly Press.
Asheville-based Woolly Press handles the look and branding for such breweries as Fonta Flora.

The zero-waste kitchen: Ideas for honoring the true value of food
By Aiyanna Sezak-Blatt

In a consumer culture, generating waste seems to be an inevitable part of life. However, in a home kitchen, individual choice, creativity and mindfulness can change that. For local foodies, a zero-waste kitchen simply means a change in perspective: Skins, stems, pulp and bones, when seen for their potential, become much more than scraps. (Continue reading)
 
 
Brand new: Local breweries are thinking outside the bottle
By Thom O’Hearn

Highland has Scotty. Green Man has the Green Man. Hi-Wire has an entire circus. Asheville’s reputation as a beer destination is chiefly due to the high-quality ales and lagers produced here. But something else is clearly going on as well: Our breweries, by and large, have a knack for branding. (Continue reading)
 
 
Leaders of the band: The people behind Asheville’s James Beard nominees
By Jonathan Ammons

Just as Duke Ellington needed a band of skilled, talented musicians, good chefs need good support players. And Asheville’s three nominees for the James Beard Foundation‘s Best Chef Southeast tip their hats to several folks whose names you might not know. (Continue reading)
 

Gourmet chef-turned-farmer Evan Chender looks to waste as little of the plant as possible.
Gourmet chef-turned-farmer Evan Chender looks to waste as little of the plant as possible.

High Five Coffee takes a side trip
By Margaret Williams

Jay Weatherly likes the “side-street feel” of his new High Five Coffee location, set to open in June on Rankin Avenue in downtown Asheville. Even on a quiet Tuesday morning, the flow of pedestrians and cars is steady. “There’s just something about Rankin that just feels good, and we’ll fit in,” says Weatherly. (Continue reading)
 
 
Toast of the town: Brevard welcomes food trucks
By Geraldine H. Dinkins

It took a hearty debate and an amendment to a city ordinance, but after being given approval last fall, Brevard’s mobile food vendors are shifting into high gear for the summer season. One of the first regular stops is the Transylvania Farmers Market, where two local food trucks can be found every Saturday morning serving breakfast to hungry marketgoers. (Continue reading)


Living

Robert Eidus says the raised bed containing ginseng and goldenseal that sits off his back deck is a sustainable solution for resupplying these highly sought plants.
Robert Eidus says the raised bed containing ginseng and goldenseal that sits off his back deck is a sustainable solution for resupplying these highly sought plants.

Overharvesting of forest plants calls for mindful consumers
By Carrie Eidson

People in the WNC mountains have been foraging in the woods for generations, seeking out edibles like mushrooms and ramps or medicinals like bloodroot, goldenseal, black cohosh and — perhaps most famously — ginseng. But with interest in these plants rising and more novice foragers venturing into the woods, the plants are becoming harder and harder to find. (Continue reading)
 
 
Mission offers new heart surgery option
By Clarke Morrison

When Claire Orenzow’s replacement heart valve failed eight years after it was surgically implanted, the symptoms were excruciating. But doctors at Mission Hospital were able to repair Orenzow’s heart with a new procedure called valve-in-valve replacement that offers significant benefits over traditional open-heart surgery, and Orenzow says she left the hospital a few days after the operation feeling like a new woman. (Continue reading)
 
 
‘Walking the Talk’: Strive Not to Drive points out pedestrian dangers
By Jane Morrell

Strive Not To Drive, a week of multimodal awareness events held throughout Asheville, held its first ever walking tour this past Tuesday, May 19, to showcase concerns and problems facing pedestrians, bikers, people with disabilities and motorists in downtown Asheville. (Continue reading)


News

Members of Code for Asheville, a local Code for America brigade, are taking steps to help alleviate one of the city’s biggest problems: the affordable housing crisis.
Members of Code for Asheville, a local Code for America brigade, are taking steps to help alleviate one of the city’s biggest problems: the affordable housing crisis.

Down the road: The future of Future I-26
By Max Hunt

On the 16-mile stretch between the Forks of Ivy (Exit 13) and the Interstate 240/Patton Avenue interchange, however, the word “future” is affixed to the standard red, white and blue interstate signs.Eventually, those qualifying signs will be taken down, once a massive construction project brings this stretch of highway up to interstate standards. But how does an ordinary highway become an interstate? (Continue reading)
 
 
Spaced out: The future of parking in downtown Asheville
By Pat Barcas

Ken Putnam has a passion for parking. The city of Asheville’s transportation director says that despite complaints, he never has a problem finding a spot downtown when he drives to work. But then again, he knows where to look. (Continue reading)
 

Fred Burchette
Fred Burchette, a consultant from Kimley-Horn, presents information at the May 5 parking meeting.

Down and out in Asheville: The face of local homelessness
By Amber McGilvary

In 2005, city and county officials adopted the 10-Year Plan to End Homelessness, an ambitious collaboration involving many local agencies. Significant progress has been made: Since 2005, chronic homelessness is down 82 percent, from 293 people to just 54, city officials say. Yet there are still homeless folks on local streets. (Continue reading)
 
 
< / housing crisis > : Code for Asheville harnesses technology to help renters, homebuyers
By Hayley Benton

In an age when you can deposit a paycheck, order a pizza and instantly connect video-to-video with a friend in Seattle in under five minutes — all while walking the dog — it’s not far-fetched to think technology could be the next step in solving real-life community issues. (Continue reading)

SHARE
About Carrie Eidson
Multimedia journalist and Green Scene editor at Mountain Xpress. Part-time Twitterer @mxenv but also reachable at ceidson@mountainx.com. Follow me @carrieeidson

Before you comment

The comments section is here to provide a platform for civil dialogue on the issues we face together as a local community. Xpress is committed to offering this platform for all voices, but when the tone of the discussion gets nasty or strays off topic, we believe many people choose not to participate. Xpress editors are determined to moderate comments to ensure a constructive interchange is maintained. All comments judged not to be in keeping with the spirit of civil discourse will be removed and repeat violators will be banned. See here for our terms of service. Thank you for being part of this effort to promote respectful discussion.

Leave a Reply

To leave a reply you may Login with your Mountain Xpress account, connect socially or enter your name and e-mail. Your e-mail address will not be published. All fields are required.