No more Eaties for you

First off, a huge thanks to all that made Eaties Cereal Bar awesome! Sadly we are closed for good. I truly wished to create a space for community to come together, and I think that wish came true. But wishes don’t pay the bills. Some of you may believe my desire to move was why I closed Eaties. The truth is that Eaties just wasn’t making it. The true reasons vary: It’s hard to compete with fast-food prices; it’s hard to have a somewhat weird location; and it’s hard to have a restaurant based solely on cereal alone. [But] the biggest reason of them all holds true: We simply ran out of money. The few that loved us were unfortunately too few and too infrequent.

Eaties was a personal last stand in my mind before Asheville turned completely into Aspen, Colo.—a yuppie tourist town. It is my observation that the creative folks are aware of this fact and are giving up on Asheville. Maybe they have found safe haven in West Asheville or Black Mountain, but those I know who live in these places rarely participate in the goings-on of Asheville, let alone visit downtown.

Asheville has been priding itself on how weird it is, but seems to do everything in its power to destroy that creative spirit. The only weird thing left is perhaps the few poetic souls who display creativity on the streets. The buskers, street performers and even the homeless are the last stand. We are left begging the rich tourists for a buck.

My hope is that the creative folks will fight back a little harder: Vote for City Council, run for City Council, protest when their city changes in ways they dislike. Practice random acts of art. Create real community. Create real industry so we don’t all have to work service jobs! Take a stand! Join Arts2People, cooperatively buy commercial real estate, support local businesses, realize there is more to community than the drum circle (which is very kick-ass). Direct tourists to the River Arts District. Visit the River Arts District. Make time to help a local nonprofit. You are part of what makes Asheville—why people want to live here, visit here and be here. Reclaim that! Asheville is your city!

This may seem odd coming from someone considering moving away. But I haven’t given up completely on this beautiful mountain city. When asked what it is I enjoy about Asheville the most, I often say the people. That answer still holds true. All the amazing people that helped make Eaties what it was. Again, I sincerely give thanks.

— Becky Johnson
Asheville

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89 thoughts on “No more Eaties for you

  1. hauntedheadnc

    Asheville would have a much easier time staying edgy and creative if the edgy and creative people would actually stand their ground a little and not scream like little girls and flee, flapping their hands in the air, off to California the instant your typical Thad and Bootsie yuppies up from Atlanta start sniffing around clutching their real estate brochures and exclaiming how quaint everything is.

    Of course, it might also help if some of this city’s edgy and creative people had more business acumen. A cereal bar is a cute and fluffy little idea, but this can be a hard town, and hard towns chew up cute, fluffy little ideas and spit out their withered husks. Mean towns require mean people and mean businesses, and it’s high time the creative and edgy people here got their head out of the clouds and got a little more cold-blooded, especially if this town is going to continue to belong to them, as I hope it will and as many hope so too.

  2. I applaud Becky Johnson for taking a stand – for attempting to maintain & build the creative counter-culture in Asheville that brought her inventive ideas here originally.

    (If her personal life takes her to other parts of the world, no one can hold that against her.)

    But I do agree with Haunted –
    If we are going to make our adored Asheville a sustainable city of the future and maintain this creative and unique core that is so attractive to so many – we must stand our ground as a city. We can not let gated communities and slope development change who we are – we must attempt to bring conscious ideas of development and sustainable growth to them.

  3. Kriss

    I am not too surprised this place has closed, certainly for all the reasons mentioned by Ms. Johnson in her letter. But there could be some more subtle factors as well. In her letter she states, “Asheville has been priding itself on how weird it is, but seems to do everything in its power to destroy that creative spirit.” It makes no sense for her to give all this lip service implying some affinity or affection for the “weird” or otherwise creative, artsy, hip people of Asheville, when in fact ostensibly, based on the storefront of her restaurant, she had no respect for individualism, freedom of choice, freedom of expression, and the right to be different.

    I never ate that restaurant. But I wanted to. I was with my wife and several friends during Bele Chere and we were looking for a place to eat lunch. We happened upon Eaties, which looked really interesting. But before walking in we were stopped in our tracks by a very large imposing, unwelcoming sign that read:
    No Shirt
    No Shoes
    NO ADMISSION!

    And to our utter amazement, just below that sign was one that inexplicably read:
    KEEP
    ASHEVILLE
    WEIRD

    This odd juxtaposition of signs was obviously some kind of sick joke. If they respected someone’s right to be weird, why the arbitrary dress code sending the opposite message?

    We were a group of middle-aged to older men and women who, though otherwise dressed quite conventionally, were all barefoot. Our being barefoot should have been of no one else’s concern, but apparently being dressed in such an unconventional manner was a huge concern to this particular restaurant, otherwise there would not have been a need for such an obtrusive sign facing every potential customer.

    Sure, businesses have a right to set up a dress code for whatever reason they want – but to do that and then spout platitudes about someone “destroying the creative spirit” and complaining about Asheville becoming a “yuppie tourist town”? Come on. What hypocrisy.

    This restaurant was the very one I was referring to in my letter to Mountain Xpress on 8/8/07. See: http://www.mountainx.com/opinion/2007/foot_in_store_is_no_disease
    It was also cleverly illustrated in Molton’s cartoon on 8/22/07. See: http://www.mountainx.com/cartoons/2007/082207molton

    So would this restaurant have fared better with, instead of a sign of exclusion, a sign of inclusion, such as, “Everyone welcome!”? I have to think so. Downtown businesses need all the help they can get. Attitude toward the public is everything. Excluding people because they aren’t dressed just right is never going to help the bottom line.

  4. Leo Fiedler

    Becky wrote : …Asheville has been priding itself on how weird it is, but seems to do everything in its power to destroy that creative spirit. The only weird thing left is perhaps the few poetic souls who display creativity on the streets….. The buskers, street performers and even the homeless are the last stand. We are left begging the rich tourists for a buck…..

    Kriss’ point is well taken. I doubt that allowing barefoot diners equal rights would have saved the restaurant, but it’s hard to believe that the person who wrote the above also posted a sign excluding the shoeless!
    One has to wonder if Ms. Johnson understands the hypocracy of her thinking.

    My hope is that the creative folks will fight back a little harder…… protest when their city changes in ways they dislike. Practice random acts of art…..

  5. There you have it Becky. Brought down by your foot facism.

    Kriss, how about you put your money where your cause is. If you are tired are being turned away at restaurants, then how about YOU open one. After you put in about 100 grand and then have to deal with the permits and renovations and inspections then all the sweat and sleepless nights and 20 hour days and worry, you will be able to hang a bright neon sign on your storefront saying, “WE WELCOME PEOPLE WITHOUT SHOES OR SHIRTS.” Will the public beat a path to your door? Or will you just let someone else take that chance for you?

    marc

  6. Kriss

    Marc, you’re missing the whole point here. Nobody’s talking about “foot facism.” I’m talking about giving lip service to the acceptance of the “weirdness” factor of Asheville, which seems to me to involve all facets of freedom of expression – including how someone is dressed – but yet blatantly post a large sign excluding certain people based only on their attire.

    And nobody is talking about being tired of being turned away at restaurants – which actually has *never* occurred for me in the Asheville area (we weren’t turned away, as we didn’t even attempt to walk in) – in fact, after deciding not to go into Eaties, we walked up to Jerusalem Garden, which does not display such an arrogant unwelcoming sign, were seated, and enjoyed an excellent meal served by a wonderful waitress.

    As to your suggested sign, why does a restaurant or other store need any sign at all describing what people are supposed to wear or not wear in order to be welcome? A sign like that is pretty rare almost everywhere except downtown Asheville. In the rare case of someone entering a business who is disruptive in some way, there are ways to handle such situations. Rude signs outside of businesses would not prevent such individuals from entering and causing problems anyway, so what’s the point?

  7. brebro

    Well, at least the sign didn’t say “Long-haired, freaky people need not apply” or something like that, requiring a person to tuck their hair up under their hat and to then proceed to go in and ask them why.

  8. Kriss

    Now, hey you Mister! can’t you read, you got to have a shirt and tie to get a seat
    You can’t even watch, no you can’t eat, you ain’t suppose to be here
    Sign said you got to have a membership card to get inside Uh!

    Sign Sign everywhere a sign
    Blocking out the scenery breaking my mind
    Do this, don’t do that, can’t you read the sign?

  9. Orbit DVD

    Kriss,

    I guess that I’m misreading you. Would you be ok with “No shirt, no admittance” signs, or would that bug you as well? How about the “no public restroom” signs that are everywhere downtown?

    To be honest, I’m in agreement with you about signs. I try really hard not to have too many up at my two stores, but I’m in disagreement that The Cereal Bar’s signs were a contributor in them closing. It’s a sign that is pretty common, and most people understand it.

    Just out of curiosity, you mention that you’ve never been turned away from a downtown restaurant. You don’t need to name them, but how many have you eaten at?

    marc

  10. Nam Vet

    Geez, you move here from up north, then whine about the changes you transplants have brought here. Your NY Times has advertised Asheville is a cool place for the “sophisticated” people to move to. So now we have a bunch of wealthy, shiftless, Manhattanites who run up prices for everyone. Well you transplants have killed the goose that laid the golden egg. You personally sound like a decent person. But I wish a lot of the transplants would leave us alone here, and go back to where they came from. We used to be like Black Mountain here. But Black Mountain is being invaded by Floridiots and New Yorkers too. So it won’t be long…

    Why can’t newcomers just accept us as we are without wanting to put up high rises downtown to be just like where they came from? And right next to the Thomas Wolfe memorial? Geez, give me a break.

  11. Trey

    Nice rant….sucks getting old and having to watch the world change around you, huh?

    BTW….Cereal bar = worst business idea eVAR.

  12. travelah

    Becky, you tried an odd approach in a city that (mistakenly) thinks itself to be odd. You failed but don’t feel bad. You have a lot of company in this “odd” city :)

  13. Kriss

    Nam Vet: “Geez, you move here from up north, then whine about the changes you transplants have brought here.”

    Not only that, but has the audacity to talk about her affection for the local people here including their eccentricities (weirdness), yet makes sure she excludes those who don’t fit some kind of yuppie image.

    On a blog she wrote on another website she says, “On more than one occasion, a tourist would come in to Eaties and comment on how ‘Funky’ and ‘weird’ asheville really was based on my little restaurant. Then they would turn around and eat at one of the nicer restaurants down the street. If I could have charged for people to have peeked at Eaties I probably wouldn’t have to be writing to you all right now and Eaties would be good as gold.”

    Yeah, I peeked at it as well, did not feel welcome, and went to another restaurant. It’s all in the attitude and vibe one gets at the front door that will get people in or keep people out.

    Trey: “….sucks getting old and having to watch the world change around you, huh?”

    Yeah, you’re right, Trey. But one advantage of being around a long time is you have historical perspective. Nam Vet is absolutely right in his assessment of what’s been going on in Asheville, not that he or I could ever change that. But without some knowledge of where we’ve been, it’s hard to know where we need to go, seems to me.

    “BTW….Cereal bar = worst business idea eVAR”

    Well, actually it’s been done before in some other parts of the country (Google “cereal bar”), and apparently with some success. Yes, the concept was questionable, but that wasn’t her only problem.

  14. Rob Close

    personally, i just couldn’t pay $3 for a bowl of cereal. breakfast all day joints are plenty popular. and cereal as a centerpiece is fine, so long as …

    a) it’s reasonably priced – which for an item we can all have at home, is very necessary. it’s one thing to pay double materials for eggplant parm, but to pay 3-4x for something a 3 year old can prepare…it just wasn’t going to happen. thus i always ordered a bagel. more filling, half the price, and i don’t keep ’em at home already.

    b) more variety of breakfast options. people want omelettes and sandwiches, even if their friends are getting cereal. this makes it harder for one person to run the store, but so what, they ended up wasting a lot of time anyway. and people are willing to wait everyone else.

    the no shirt/no shoes thing – whatever, that’s a stupid complaint. especially since that’s a normal distinction made, especially where health-codes are concerned. freaky isn’t about dress, it’s an attitude, which is one of tolerance.

    anyway, that’s my 2 cents. if you’re ever going to restart eaties, i highly suggest finding a way to make cereal reasonably priced and expanding the menu. making lots of slightly profitable sales is better for a young business than a few solidly profitable ones.

  15. Leo Fiedler

    Rob Close wrote:
    …the no shirt/no shoes thing – whatever, that’s a stupid complaint. especially since that’s a normal distinction made, especially where health-codes are concerned. freaky isn’t about dress, it’s an attitude, which is one of tolerance……….

    Ashville health codes do not require shirt or shoes for retail or restaurant customers, and neither do State or County regulations. Therefore, Rob is incorrect in his assumption.
    Maybe for Mr. Close freaky does not include dress, but he’d have a hard time convincing the masses of that.
    As far as shirt and shoes being “a normal distinction made”, uh, no, not in my experience.
    My wife and I dine barefoot just about everywhere, and not just in North Carolina I might add.
    The few places that do choose to refuse us service based on our lack of footwear usually are 3’rd rate joints with few customers.
    Wonder why Eaties and others businesses that actually could use the extra customers insist on being so strict in their dress codes?
    Matter of fact, isn’t cereal very commonly consumed in bare feet?

  16. “The few places that do choose to refuse us service based on our lack of footwear usually are 3’rd rate joints with few customers.”

    Have you tried Table yet?

    marc

  17. Nam Vet

    LOL, Trey, being “old” is a plus in a lot of ways. If you are a 20-something, you are in for a fun ride in this life. Yes, I sometimes do pine for the old days here in Asheville. I accept change, but this site is for ranting on occasion. OK? The very reason Asheville has been such a great place to live is tied to it’s past. Traditional American values. Yet very tolerant of many points of view. Asheville was like this 30 years ago…as it still is. The downside to accepting most all who move here is that the town is changing because we have been found out. So the “sophisticates” from up north are here with their money and they are changing Asheville. I just hope it doesn’t change too much. Before these outsiders grow tired of this town and move elsewhere. My roots are very deep here, hence my concern. Hope everyone ends up happy with Asheville essentially unchanged very much. Transplants, be careful not to kill the golden goose.

  18. Kriss

    Rob Close: “the no shirt/no shoes thing – whatever, that’s a stupid complaint.”

    If you want to think it’s a “stupid complaint,” that’s fine, but to me such unwelcoming signs send a message of unfriendliness, arrogance, and intolerance.

    “especially since that’s a normal distinction made, especially where health-codes are concerned.”

    What? What are you talking about? What health codes regulate a customer’s attire? Sounds like you’re buying into a popular urban myth. The fact is, there are none. And the reason there are none is because what a customer wears or doesn’t wear in a restaurant or any other business has no effect whatsoever on anyone’s health. How could it? Just think about it. Tell me how a barefoot person could possibly cause any harm to anything or anyone in a restaurant or other store. I’m curious to hear your reasoning.

    “freaky isn’t about dress, it’s an attitude, which is one of tolerance.”

    Come on. It’s about dress and appearance more than anything else. And tolerance? Where’s the tolerance of businesses that post arbitrary dress code signs? There’s a lot of hypocrisy going on in downtown Asheville.

  19. Kriss

    Marc: “Have you tried Table yet?”

    I’ve never tried Table myself. I actually don’t get downtown very often.

    Why, do they have some kind of dress code sign as well?

  20. Kriss

    Hey Marc, I just noticed your comment posted Jan. 19th at 8:30 p.m. I don’t think it was there earlier today, which makes sense since you didn’t log yourself in to post it – so it got delayed in showing up. Anyway, I will respond to it, just don’t have time at the moment. Just wanted to let you know I’m not ignoring it. :)

  21. Trey

    By all means rant away NamVet, it’s certainly you’re right.

    Mmmm…… stinky feet and cereal breath.

    That ought to be enough to keep any one from moving here.

  22. Rob Close

    Foot Fungus.

    And so what if asheville doesn’t have a health code against it – other places do, and for good reason. Eaties had a couchy atmosphere, where people put their feet up and feel comfortable about it. No foot fungus allowed!

    I just find it absurd that a business has failed and that sign is being treated as a main cause.

  23. Kriss

    Foot fungus does not occur in people who go barefoot all the time. Foot fungus is caused by the damp, warm conditions that exist inside a shoe. But just hypothetically, say if someone who wears shoes all the time and did have athlete’s foot or some other fungus and walked into a restaurant – how would that affect the food or anyone else? Feet remain in the floor, just like shoes do that have walked in all kinds of crap and are never washed.

    And other places DO NOT have health codes against being barefoot in a business. You’re very misinformed. No state or county in the United States has such health codes.

    Who said a sign was the *main* cause of Eaties’ failing? Certainly not I.

    Hey Rob, you apparently want to start this whole argument all over again that was discussed ad infinitum back in August with 135 comments on a letter I wrote.
    http://www.mountainx.com/opinion/2007/foot_in_store_is_no_disease
    Why don’t you go back and read all those comments first, and then if you feel something was left out, let me know and I’ll fill you in. I know about going barefoot. You don’t.

  24. Kriss

    Trey: “Mmmm…… stinky feet and cereal breath.”

    Well, FWIW, feet aren’t stinky unless they’re enclosed in shoes on a regular basis. Your hands would smell too if you kept leather mittens on them all day long every day. Feet only stink when the fungus and dead skin cells inside of shoes contaminates the feet. That’s not going to happen to feet that are always exposed to fresh air and light.

  25. “I’ve never tried Table myself. I actually don’t get downtown very often.

    Why, do they have some kind of dress code sign as well?”

    I’ve never seen a sign there, but it’s one of the fancier places in downtown. I could imagine places like BE, Rosetta’s or ethnic restaurants not caring, but some of the nicer ones might not be tolerant.

    Do you have enough callouses to handle 7 degree weather???

    marc

  26. Rob Close

    you are the bare-footed expert!

    glad i looked this up – didn’t realize you could drive bare-footed, that’s at least 2 urban myths it seems i’ve falled prey to here.

  27. Kriss

    Marc: “I guess that I’m misreading you. Would you be ok with ‘No shirt, no admittance’ signs, or would that bug you as well? How about the ‘no public restroom’ signs that are everywhere downtown?”

    Good questions, Marc. Here’s how I feel about signs in general. This country is filled with signs everywhere telling us what we can or cannot do, what is or what is not allowed. I think a lot of people would be totally lost without signs always directing their behavior or listing rules and regulations regarding every aspect of their lives. I think it’s outrageous that there are a few stores out there that feel compelled to tell perfect strangers what they can or cannot wear, whether it’s on their feet or on their bodies, when such apparel or lack of it has no effect or impact whatsoever on the store or any other person. The United States, notwithstanding the First Amendment giving people freedom of expression, seems to be the only country in the world where such signs appear in stores or restaurants.

    Therefore a “No shirt, no admittance” sign would indeed bug me, but it wouldn’t necessarily have any direct effect on me since I always wear a shirt when I’m out and about. The odd thing is I’ve found, some businesses actually are only concerned with some guy walking in without a shirt, so they want to post a rule about it, but for some reason they think they have to include a shoe rule as well. I dealt with an actual case like that a while back; it was a bank. After talking to bank management, I found out they put up a “shirt and shoes required” sign at that one branch only because some disruptive guy (rude, using bad language, and with swastikas tattooed on his chest and back) had been coming in shirtless. But someone only being barefoot was actually no issue for them. They agreed the sign really looked bad anyway on their door, so they agreed to remove it – the complete sign.

    “No public restroom” signs are not telling people how they must dress. It’s sad that places in downtown must restrict their restrooms, but I guess that’s because of the homeless around. Away from downtown you don’t see that.

    “To be honest, I’m in agreement with you about signs. I try really hard not to have too many up at my two stores, but I’m in disagreement that The Cereal Bar’s signs were a contributor in them closing. It’s a sign that is pretty common, and most people understand it.”

    Actually, signs like that are not “pretty common” at all. That’s a misconception. I’m not sure how you figure that.

    “Just out of curiosity, you mention that you’ve never been turned away from a downtown restaurant. You don’t need to name them, but how many have you eaten at?”

    I didn’t say “downtown” restaurants; I said the Asheville area. I live outside the city and actually very rarely get downtown. But to answer your question, I’ve eaten while barefoot at about 4 places downtown. One actually did give me some attitude a few years ago and didn’t want to let me in, citing “the health code.” When I showed them my letter from the health department debunking that myth, they let me in. As to the whole Asheville area, including some surrounding counties, it would be about 40 different restaurants that I’ve been in barefoot with no problems from anyone and have not been turned away from one.

  28. Kriss

    Marc: “I’ve never seen a sign there, but it’s one of the fancier places in downtown…but some of the nicer ones might not be tolerant.”

    Strangely, as a rule, it works just the opposite. The better, high-end restaurants tend to be more repectful of their customers and are less likely to make some kind of issue out of how someone is dressed. Cheap fast food places in general are more likely to give barefooters a problem.

    “Do you have enough callouses to handle 7 degree weather???”

    Nobody’s bare feet could handle 7 degree weather for more than a few minutes. Frostbite is a serious consideration. But I can handle around 28 to 30 degree weather almost indefinitely as long as it’s not wet. Extreme temperatures are about the only reasons people really need some kind of foot coverings.

  29. Nam Vet

    Kriss, cudos for your independence in the barefoot thing. I go barefoot at home, and always remove my shoes when I enter another’s home. In the warmer months, I rarely wear socks. I like my feet to breath. I like to go barefoot in my yard. The feel of the grass is pleasant when the feet are bare.
    But I don’t understand walking barefoot out on city sidewalks and streets. Doesn’t it get the bottoms of your feet really dirty? With all the oil, gum, and what not that’s on the paved surfaces? And there are occasional hazards that can cut your feet. Just wondering.

    And I agree that some signs are a turn off. A gas station close to my house has a sign on the pumps saying “smile you are being videotaped”. I find that insulting. And I agree the downtown businesses put up signs “customers only” on their restrooms to keep out the “homeless” (read bums). I occasionally stop into Malaprop’s just to use the bathroom and am never stopped,even though they have a “customers only” sign.. Of course I do shop there on some days.

    The thing about Eaties failing as a business…it’s rather simple. No research was done BEFORE opening. It’s called getting a professional marketing study to see if a particular area will support your business. It’s amazing the percentage of people who will sink a couple of hundred thousand dollars in a small business without marketing research. Then go out of business in a year. I never patronized Eaties, but remember when they first started doing business. And I wondered how they could pay rent in the heart of downtown and only serve cereal. Well it’s another case of northerners coming here and sticking up businesses that work up in NYC or Boston, but do not here. Businessmen: do your research FIRST.

  30. Kriss, thanks for your clarifications on this. Like others have mentioned, I personally don’t feel the sign contributed to The Cereal Bar’s demise. Lack of a full kitchen and a TERRIBLE location are what I think the main contributors. Hope your feet can handle boots for these next few weeks!

    Nam Vet, Northerners are not the only people with crackpot ideas for businesses. We Southerners can think them up as well. I have found many a pet shop on sparsely populated rural roads. My favorite however was in Smithville, TN… SHOES AND CHEESE. It didn’t make it btw.

    marc

  31. Kriss

    “Kriss, cudos for your independence in the barefoot thing…”

    Thanks, Nam Vet, I appreciate hearing that.

    “But I don’t understand walking barefoot out on city sidewalks and streets. Doesn’t it get the bottoms of your feet really dirty? With all the oil, gum, and what not that’s on the paved surfaces? And there are occasional hazards that can cut your feet. Just wondering.”

    As to really dirty or not, that all depends on the surface walked on. Feet were designed to walk on all surfaces and getting them dirty is just normal, is to be expected, and is not harmful in any way. Shoes walking on the same surfaces get just as dirty, but it may be more visible on the soles of feet because of the color of skin and a temporary staining that may occur. All that is easily washed off with soap and water. Shoes on the other hand are never washed – in fact washing most shoes will ruin them. People don’t usually even think about where they are stepping when wearing shoes – unlike someone barefoot who is always aware of where he or she is stepping. A barefooter definitely has an increased awareness and sensory perception of the environment upon which he or she is walking.

    As to hazards, dangers to bare feet on the ground or paved surfaces are greatly overrated. People who never go barefoot themselves quite often seem to have an extremely unrealistic view of how vulnerable feet are. The fact is, almost nothing usually found on the ground or paved surfaces can actually cause injury or serious harm to bare feet, especially for someone who’s used to being barefoot. I know – I’ve been doing this for many years. And that includes little bits of glass that you sometimes see strewn around. Large shards of glass are easily seen and avoided. But small bits of glass can be stepped straight down on while barefoot without getting cut. There’s a greater chance of getting a paper cut on your hand than any kind of cut on your bare feet.

  32. Kriss

    Back a little more on topic, I wish the writer of the letter would respond to some to these comments. I’d love to hear her take on this.

  33. “Back a little more on topic, I wish the writer of the letter would respond to some to these comments. I’d love to hear her take on this.”

    She’s probably got better things to do then hang out here.

    marc

  34. Becky Johnson

    Well well well. I didn’t know I would cause such great debate! To be honest I have not commented yet because I did not find out anyone wrote any responses until yesterday (tues 22). I would love to meet with all of you if this topic is still worth a conversation. There are so many valid, interesting and stabbing points here I would love to be face to face to discuss them with you all. How about malaprops the 30th at 6:30pm? Hope to see you all THERE! Shoes or no shoes and bring a couple bucks to support local business!-Becky

  35. Right on Becky –
    Bring these conversations out into a live public forum. I’ll try to be there –

    I hope the ‘Shoeless Joe’s’ out there who claim to support Asheville creativity and ‘freakiness’ will be as well.

  36. Kriss

    Interesting reaction, Becky, but what you’re proposing is hardly practical. Only 10 or so people bothered to post some kind of response to your letter, but that doesn’t mean that only those 10 are interested in your point of view or possible further discussion by others.

    By sending a letter to Mountain Xpress, you brought this issue – that is, your issues and problems with a failed restaurant – before the whole world – not just Asheville. The issues raised have somewhat universal application, seems to me, not just local, that is, why does a small business fail so quickly? Was it the concept and product – as most people seem to feel – or was it a combination of that and many other factors?

    No doubt thousands of people have read your letter and the comments posted, but your suggestion of bringing the few posters here together in some kind of personal meeting would leave all other readers and interested persons completely in the dark. Not only that, obviously many people here are concerned about their personal privacy, otherwise they wouldn’t be posting under a pseudonym, so I’m not sure the format you’re suggesting would be comfortable them either.

    So I guess if you want to get together with a few people and have a nice chat, that’s fine. It’s true that sometimes a personal meeting between two people who may have certain differences of opinion or misunderstandings between themselves can easily resolve those issues, just by shaking hands and getting to know the other person. But I don’t see this as that situation; this is not anything personal between you and me or between you and other commenters. What you’re proposing would be very inconvenient, and I see no practical point in such a personal meeting.

    So instead of sort of side stepping some of the points that have been discussed here, I’d be very interested in actually hearing (reading) what you have to say here where it can be read by everyone, not in some private meeting.

  37. xvelouria

    I agree with Kriss. Unless you’re going to report back on here what happened with the discussion, I don’t see any reason not to just address it here. I, for one, am interested in the topic, but not enough to miss work to go to some meeting about it. I’m sure everyone who has an opinion on it won’t be able to make it. Why not continue the discussion here, where it was started?

  38. Nam Vet

    Becky, I agree. Face to face is always best. I’ll try to make it. In the meantime, Kriss has a point. Make a few points in a post here in response to all the points raised.

  39. James P. Fisher

    I like shoes, cereal and a good debate.
    Eaties was a fun concept with truly cool decor in a horrible location. We took our kids there and they loved it- no surprise,right? My wife organized a field trip to Eaties once and the kids…LOVED IT! Having a few more food options may have helped, a better locale certainly would have given it a better chance….ah, hindsight and arm-chair quarterbacking.

    Equating this with the Malthusian prophecies about Asheville’s spiritual future seems a bit broad to me. Still, Eaties was a good shot at something and you should be proud. Good luck where ever you go!

  40. hauntedheadnc

    I wish I could come to the discussion, but I’ll be working that night.

  41. Becky Johnson

    Thanks to James for that comment. To be completely honest marc from Orbits is right. I really do have better things to do than post responses to a letter that honestly was supposed to just be a fond farewell to my customers of a business I will admit had it’s flaws.(One example of better things to do is to try to find a decent job now that remotely pays a living wage)

    Kriss..I sincerely apologize for the sign about shoes.I must have just misread the 25 page health code before frantically trying to open a restaurant in two months…seriously, I meant no offense.If I had known I would not have been shut down for shoeless customers, then I wouldn’t have put the sign up. Thank you for enlightening me.

    Kriss..Your question of

    “why does a small business fail so quickly? Was it the concept and product – as most people seem to feel – or was it a combination of that and many other factors?”

    is a valid question. However I really wasn’t asking it in my letter.My letter more specifically stated “My hope is that the creative folks will fight back a little harder: Vote for City Council, run for City Council, protest when their city changes in ways they dislike. Practice random acts of art. Create real community. Create real industry so we don’t all have to work service jobs! Take a stand! etc etc etc….”

    I was not writing a letter to the world to whine about my little business or find out why it failed. It probably failed because I tried to open a restaurant with $10,000. YES maybe a cereal bar is the dumbest possible business idea ever. Having a super successful business came second to my desire to be my own boss and to create a space for community . I didn’t want to open a coffee shop because of the overhead and the fact I don’t drink coffee. So a cereal bar it was. And it died. the end.

    I beseech you all to stop missing the point. If everyone here really wants to rant about cereal bars, shoes, dumb business ideas and health codes than count me out. My intention of the letter was a goodbye to my customers and a call for the creative people to take a stand against the changes they don’t like in a city they love.
    The end. I’m sorry but this will be my last post. seeing how I have no job, no money and a lot of debt I do not have internet currently and trips to the library are a little ridiculous when I have better things to do. See you on the 30th if you would like to discuss creative solutions to our cities changes. -Becky

  42. The Great Gatsby

    One thing that still hasn’t changed about Asheville is that people here will find literally anything to argue about, and in doing so will always blame out-of-towners with money for anything they don’t like.

  43. Kriss

    Becky: “…I sincerely apologize for the sign about shoes.I must have just misread the 25 page health code before frantically trying to open a restaurant in two months…seriously, I meant no offense.If I had known I would not have been shut down for shoeless customers, then I wouldn’t have put the sign up. Thank you for enlightening me.”

    You obviously did (misread it), because where a health code might refer to someone’s attire, it is referring to *employees* not customers. If you still have those 25 pages, you may want to go back and reread them sometime. A simple call to the health department can usually clear up anything that’s not clear (as Mountain Xpress did when they published my original letter). But also, didn’t you notice that *most* other restaurants do not have such signs posted?

    Anyway, except for those comments, I don’t want to continue on that point, as I realize you may not be able to further discuss this here anyway. I sincerely appreciate and accept your apology.

    I wish you the best of luck in all your future endeavors. :)

  44. Becky has brought up several valid points –
    What I supported most about Eaties was by all means NOT the cereal.

    I supported a safe and entertaining place for kids and adults to hang out downtown… there are not many kid friendly venues downtown with exception of Enviro-Depot and the Health Adventure.

    I supported a cheap and mostly healthy alternative option to fast food for the people who work downtown but can’t necessarily afford $12 a plate. With the exception of Rosetta’s & the Noodle Shop I rarely can afford to eat downtown.

    I supported a creative hang out for the “freaks” and artists of Asheville. The essence of creativity is what brings so many people to this city and surrounding area. However our overt trendiness and popularity (thanks to be listed ‘Best Place to _____’ in every magazine for the past 7 years) we’ve attracted tons of tourists, transients and re-locaters. I am not against people coming to Asheville, by all means I support it. Our city is amazing and it attracts on the whole good folks. However I do NOT support the high prices and low wages that have followed this trend. We are driving out some of the most essential aspects that keep this area a unique haven for creative types!

    I support an active community forum that was allowed and invited there. We had the Traveling Bonfires show important current indie films. We had the Asheville Indie Media Project meeting there. After that whole flag incident this summer we had the Citizen Action Awareness Committee meeting there where many ideas were birthed. We had the Blue Ridge Roller Girls meeting there and the Counter-Culture Craft Fair start there as well. It was a spot that everyone knew they would be welcomed into – it was a community center. Above all else this is what I supported.

    I supported a young woman in her twenties trying to start a future in the city. Becky traveled the entire US searching for a place to call home. She found Asheville and wanted to start a life here dedicating her talents to this community. She exemplified the future of what this city needs to be. As a first time business she ran into several unknowns and many hard-earned lessons. The cereal bar closed – so be it. Had it succeeded I don’t think she would be so quick to run off to California – but through this experience she has first hand witnessed some very scary trends emerging in Asheville.

    My young-adult peers are flocking by the handfuls to other destinations in order to find similar progressing cities where they can actually afford to buy homes, start businesses, innovate ideas, and start families.

    Asheville is NOT currently catering to the future, which is a shame. We have so much potential, so many people want to come here and so many more people support what this city COULD be.

    Asheville needs to hold a mirror up to itself and really assess what it values and what it wants to look like 20 years from now.
    Will we be another Aspen Colorado filled with affluent white well-to-do folks stripped of diversity but wallowing in self contrived worth?
    Or will we choose to create a city of the future valuing creativity, spirituality, and environmental sanctity; accepting of anyone who wants to join the community?

    I hoped that Becky’s meeting proposal would help start asking the hard questions that need to be asked –
    I’ll be there.
    Hope some of you will be as well.

    -JBo

  45. Very well… we had two other strong independent young women attend and we discussed the hardships of owning/starting a business in downtown Asheville.

  46. John

    I’d like to address the ‘no shirt, no shoes’ comment: I’m pretty sure the FDA requires shoes, shirt, and various other things in an eating establishment. Also, the idea is ‘Keep AVL Weird’ not “Keep AVL Gross”.
    Anyway, I wish the locals would have more ‘community in business’. We don’t need more tourist shops here, we need some cool ones like Eaties. Some local places have shutdown which is a huge shame, IE Beanstreets, Vincents, Rio Burrito, Indigenous, now Eaties, .. some places which were icons of AVL. It’s a shame when a city sells out the very things which made it attractive. Utterly foolish. Progressiveness should a be complement to what exists and already is established to make a place attractive, not replacing it.
    These businesses should stoically demand that locals become involved in their support and welfare. Because as these businesses die, so does Asheville’s spirit, becoming another dime-a-dozen ‘Paradise from a Can’, like most beautiful places in the world, the enjoyment of beauty and what Creator has given us comes with a price tag and a Class heirearchy.

  47. Kriss

    “I’d like to address the ‘no shirt, no shoes’ comment: I’m pretty sure the FDA requires shoes, shirt, and various other things in an eating establishment. Also, the idea is ‘Keep AVL Weird’ not ‘Keep AVL Gross’.”

    John, I’m afraid your ignorance is showing, or maybe it’s just your wishful thinking for something that would validate your personal biases, prejudices, and intolerance of other people who may look different or dress differently from you. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulates food, drugs, medical devices and a few other related items. It has nothing to do with the attire of a customer of any business. OSHA regulates safety requirements related to employees and may in some cases require certain types of garments for those *employees*, depending on the business. It also has nothing to do with the attire of a customer or patron of a business. State and local health departments regulate and inspect businesses, particularly restaurants and grocery stores, for certain health hazards or risks related to food handling and storage. It also has absolutely nothing to do with the attire of a customer or patron of any business, contrary to the urban myth believed by many.

  48. Leo Fiedler

    It’s amazing how some people believe in that urban myth.
    I think it’s because some restaurants have chosen to post the silly “No bare feet by order of health department” sign.
    People see it, and believe it.
    I have had many of those types of signs taken down when I pointed out to the owners that they were engaged in a highly illegal lie. A business owner is not allowed to claim non-existant regulations as the basis for their own dress code. There ARE rules against THAT!

  49. John

    OSHA, FDA, wrong acronym. True, Im ignorant about the specifics of food service. I’d rather not eat next to a shoeless, shirtless person. Pretty gross, I doubt any cleanliness oriented person would, which is one of the things that seperate us from a 3rd world country. And seriously, who looks at a sign on an eatery and is aggravated about not being able to eat half-naked? Gnarly.
    Mainly, it’s aggravating seeing great Asheville type places disappearing due to “Dog Bakeries” and Real Estate shops downtown. Absurd.
    I seriously doubt you’ve been a person here, born here, and seeing the area being sold out for things that diminish Asheville, like little kids driving around in Lotus’s and tinted Lux cars speeding around downtown making it unsafe, condos people griping about the drum circle being ‘loud’ at night, and a general discourse from what has made Asheville attractive. It’s just my own personal growing pains of our city, like watching a child grow up to be an aggravating, uninteresting, dull and dime a dozen person. Waste. Enjoy it, friend. The only prejudice I hold in this case is against those who disrespect exactly that which has made this city thrive.
    Seriously… Weird is kilts, sarongs, people playing music in random places, cars that look like green fish, but no shoes is unsanitary, dirty, and dangerous in a CITY. When
    Since a business is having trouble, and its an eating establishment for petes sake, does anyone seriously think that allowing shirtless shoeless people to eat there is going to make it more attractive to eat in? Name a place downtown that does that. PS Kriss. you’re long blaa about ‘feet and surfaces’ is nuts. i ran around WNC barefoot from 0-12, and there’s plenty of stuff that will tear your feet up. What a load of baloney. Anyway, its about respect.

  50. Kriss

    “I’d rather not eat next to a shoeless, shirtless person.”

    It’s amazing how this old tired topic keeps coming up. Some people seem obsessed with it and will not let it go in spite of all that’s been posted. Let’s get one thing straight. I’m not defending shirtless persons going into restaurants or other businesses. Besides, it doesn’t seem fair anyway for males to be able to go anywhere shirtless and it’s illegal for females to do the same. But that’s entirely another topic. As a rule, I personally would never go into a business shirtless. So that’s a non-issue as far as I’m concerned.

    Unfortunately, in the few businesses where these arrogant, unwelcoming signs appear, they always seem to put “shoes” and “shirts” together as if a shoeless person will always be a shirtless person. But my issue is unwelcoming signs in general, regardless of what they say, such as the one posted by Eaties. Why are they needed? Do these businesses really think if they don’t put such signs up, they will be overrun by shirtless, shoeless people causing all kinds of havoc? That’s just ridiculous. I’ve personally never seen a barefoot person, ever, in downtown Asheville. Even the most destitute homeless person will be wearing some kind of footwear. The vast majority of restaurants, not only downtown, but everywhere, do *not* have such signs posted. They seem to survive, thrive, and function just fine. As I’ve said before, there are ways of dealing with some undesirable person who has come into a business for the wrong reasons. Posting some kind of arbitrary dress code is not going to keep out homeless people, panhandlers, drunks, mentally unbalanced, prostitutes, bums or anyone else that may be disruptive to a business or its customers.

    “Seriously… Weird is kilts, sarongs, people playing music in random places, cars that look like green fish, but no shoes is unsanitary, dirty, and dangerous in a CITY.”

    Please explain how bare feet are more unsanitary than bare hands, which touch practically everything that other people will be touching, whereas bare feet will only be in the floor just like shoes are. And shoes are actually more dirty than bare feet could ever be. They walk on all kinds of stuff, track it everywhere without anyone giving it a second thought, are touched by hands when being put on or taken off, and are never washed. At the same time, the insides of shoes are a virtual Petri dish of bacteria and fungus thriving in the warm, damp environment of dead skin cells and perspiration, causing feet to stink and develop various infections. Bare feet are healthy and natural and never have the problems that people get from wearing shoes.

    And if you believe it’s “dangerous” to be barefoot in a “CITY,” then by all means do not do it. But what risks, if any, others choose to assume that have no direct effect on you are really none of your business. The fact is, walking barefoot, especially for someone with tough, conditioned feet and are used to it, in a city is not at all “dangerous.” Most people who don’t do this really have a very distorted view how vulnerable bare feet actually are.

    “Anyway, its about respect.”

    Respect? You talk about respect, and you’d tell other people they must dress exactly like you? It’s *you* that’s showing no respect. Would I tell you what you should be wearing or not wearing? Of course not. True respect is accepting “what [the] Creator has given us.”

  51. Trey

    little kids driving around in Lotus’s and tinted Lux cars speeding around downtown and making it unsafe…..

    Hahhahaaha.. this guy is freaking hilarious.

    What, are you like 80 years old??

    Those daggum whippersnappers!!!!! They are driving with bare feet too!!!!

  52. Kriss

    Yeah, Trey, the youth of today – they’re going to hell in a handbasket for sure!

  53. quotequeen

    sometimes think that God in creating man somewhat overestimated his ability.
    ~ Oscar Wilde

  54. John

    Kriss: You’ve a great imagination because most of the things you come up with arent what I said.
    Anyway, women can go topless in asheville. It’s been confirmed by policemen, the naked bike ride and local business doing specialty female’s nights. Do something worthwhile with your time, instead of fighting for naked feet alter it to naked breasts. That’ll provide happiness.

  55. Kriss

    John: “You’ve a great imagination because most of the things you come up with arent what I said.”

    I quoted word for word what you said and responded to it, unless you’re referring to the joke between Trey and me about the “youth of today.” Otherwise, what things did I “come up with” that “arent what [you] said”?

    “Do something worthwhile with your time, instead of fighting for naked feet alter it to naked breasts. That’ll provide happiness.”

    I hate to break this to you, but what I do with my time is not contingent in any way on how “worthwhile” you may think it is. If you don’t feel something is worthwhile, then by all means don’t do it yourself. I could just as easily tell you that you should be doing something worthwhile with your time instead of expressing intolerance as well as ignorance of the law about something that you know very little about and which has no effect whatsoever on your life.

    And I have no interest in fighting for naked breasts, but I’m happy that you do and that you feel that would be a worthwhile project. I suggest you pursue that course if that’s what would make you happy.

  56. quotequeen

    I like a friend better for having faults that one can talk about.
    William Hazlitt (1778 – 1830)

  57. JOhn

    PS Kriss: This is something people should continually tell you personally: “I know believe you understand what you think I said. But I am not sure you realize that what you heard is not what I meant.” Good luck.

  58. Kriss

    John, the point here, as I see it, is that you should say clearly what you mean to begin with. Words, especially written words, obviously can be interpretted differently from what the speaker or writer intended, so speaking or writing clearly and unambiguously is very important. But if it becomes clear that someone listening or reading is not understanding what you are talking about, then that’s the fault of the speaker/writer, not the listener/reader. And at that point, clarification should be forthcoming.

  59. John

    Kriss, they wrote this about you:
    They call me Mr. Knowitall
    I will not compromise.
    I will not be told what to do.
    I shall not step aside.
    They call me Mr. Knowitall
    I have no time to waste.
    My mouth it spews pure intellect.
    And I’ve such elegant taste.
    They call me Mr. Knowitall.
    I sup the aged wine.
    Oh I could tell such wonderous tales
    if I should find the time.
    I must be Mr. Knowitall
    For ideas they come in bounds.
    I am Mr. Knowitall
    So spread the word around.
    They call me Mr. Knowitall
    I am so eloquent.
    Perfection is my middle name
    And whatever rhymes with eloquent.

  60. Kriss

    John, if you disagree with something I’ve posted, why don’t you just clearly say what you disagree with and explain how or why you have a different point of view? You obviously have simply run out of anything approaching an intelligent response or rebuttal, but you cannot seem to let it go. Resorting to copying and posting the lyrics to a Primus song as some kind of silly way to hurl insults at me is rather childish, in my opinion. As far as “know it all” is concerned, no, I don’t “know it all,” but I certainly know a LOT more about the topic at hand than you do – and by posting that last “comment,” you as well as conceded to that fact.

  61. John

    No, kriss, i just am not interested in looking back over the obvious statements youve made to contradict yourself at least 3 times. if you’re that blind, then its not worth it to me. thanks, though, for reminding me how stuck we humans can get in being right. and no, thats not a compliment to you.

  62. Kriss

    Kriss: “John, if you disagree with something I’ve posted, why don’t you just clearly say what you disagree with and explain how or why you have a different point of view?”

    John: “No, kriss, i just am not interested in looking back over the obvious statements youve made to contradict yourself at least 3 times.”

    I have no clue as to what you’re talking about. Your “arguments” are really all over the place, and since you’re not “interested” in clarifying what your point is here, I guess you’re saying that you have nothing more to say, and that’s fine with me.

  63. John

    CONTRADICTION:
    KRISS: “Besides, it doesn’t seem fair anyway for males to be able to go anywhere shirtless and it’s illegal for females to do the same. But that’s entirely another topic.”
    KRISS: “And I have no interest in fighting for naked breasts,but I’m happy that you do” (This is also a misrepresentation, I didnt say im interested in fighting for it. I said that you should since you mentioned its injustice in the first place.)
    KRISS: “I could just as easily tell you that you should be doing something worthwhile with your time instead of expressing intolerance as well as ignorance of the law” Intolerance of a law? Where? My preference is not to eat next to random shoeless shirtless strangers, that’s quite a difference. You dont know me or my diversification, and what I’m tolerant of, only one eating preference.

    ABSURD MISREPRESENTATION:
    KRISS:”that would validate your personal biases, prejudices, and intolerance of other people who may look different or dress differently from you.”
    I said nothing of the sort like that. Me saying it’s gross to eat next to a shoeless, shirtless random stranger in a paying establishment is me wanting to live in a non-3rd world country, not all the embellishments that you ASSUMED out of that statement.
    FALSE EXPERTISE:
    “The fact is, walking barefoot, especially for someone with tough, conditioned feet and are used to it, in a city is not at all “dangerous.””
    How are you an expert on that?

    RANDOM QUOTES TO BACKUP MY HYPOTHESIS:
    “Real knowledge is to know the extent of one’s ignorance.” There’s a quote for you since you like ’em.
    Another: “Nothing in the world is more dangerous than a sincere ignorance and conscientious stupidity.”
    Since you won’t understand either: You’re so sincere about things you dont know about, you cant see the idea that you actually dont know about these things you keep speaking of. Just because someone isnt around to take the time to contradict your foolishness doesnt make it right.

    “The recipe for perpetual ignorance is: Be satisfied with your opinions and content with your knowledge.”
    That one makes me realize you’re not worth talking to anymore, since your mindset obviously wont change from ‘being right’.

    Lastly, each thing i’ve said you go into a huge diatribe ASSUMING many things from the very small amount of information i’ve said, things that are far embellished to what i’ve actually said. You add on all kinds of things that i’ve not said and don’t mean. You’re arguing with yourself, not me. CONCLUSION: You’re an idiot. ( I should be nicer, but you’re so damned annoying I can’t help it).

    So I stated this situation of this argument to a few friends, here’s their feedback: Female freind: “She’s one of the feminist liberals at UNCA”.
    male friend: “It’s a girl.”
    So which of those are true?
    And the Primus lyrics are a very fitting ‘quote’ about you.
    I never responded earlier so clearly because it wasn’t worth my time, and i’ve been laughing over this because you’re so intense about winning it. Also, you’re so absurd it’s you’re not worth the time to explain anything to since you’ll only see it in your own limited point of view.
    Even you’re alteration of saying “[the] Creator” instead of “Creator”, as if you can prove even if there is a creator, that it’s a single “the” entity.
    Quotes here, there, and everywhere are worthless anyway… a person can come up with any random point and find a quote to match it.
    The only thing that continues this is my amazement at your ability to continuously manipulate anythign that comes into your field of view to somehow have to dominate the situation and prove your own meaningfulness. Dear lord, give it up. You’re going to get an ulcer. You win, you’re right about everything, youre super smart and im super dumb, i dont know anything and if i did, it would only be an inkling compared to the tremendous and uber-magnificence of what you know. Since all this can be proved anyway.
    I’m going to walk downtown in my bare feet and buy a sandwich shirtless and let the mustard drip down on my hairy belly and ask girls to show their boobs since its legal, and i tolerate legality!

  64. Kriss

    “CONCLUSION: You’re an idiot.”

    Wow! I guess you told me. LOL! I realize you must have spent a lot of time composing that long and disjointed diatribe, but what you just said above is pretty much the gist of it. It’s pretty sad that you are so obsessed with this topic. Why don’t you just let it go? How another human being dresses is really none of your concern. I wouldn’t tell you how to dress, so why would you want to tell me or anyone else how they must dress?

    “‘The fact is, walking barefoot, especially for someone with tough, conditioned feet and are used to it, in a city is not at all “dangerous.”‘
    How are you an expert on that?”

    I’m an expert because I go barefoot pretty much 24/7 and have done so for many years. I have also done extensive research into the physiological and health benefits of going barefoot, as well as medical and safety factors, as well as the historical, cultural, and religious aspects of going barefoot, plus legal ramifications, if any. I’ve walked on many city streets (not to mention many other surfaces) barefoot, not only in Asheville, but in many other parts of the U.S. and other parts of the world. There are lots of activities that could be thought of as “dangerous” to someone who is not familiar with them, has never done them, and knows nothing about them. I’m a “trained professional,” so to speak – you’re not – so you’re way out of your league here if you’re trying to tell me what’s “dangerous” or not for something that I do every day and have done for years.

  65. John

    Obsessed? Disjointed diatribe? bla bla? All those things you say describe yourself, If you can realize that.
    Im not obsessed w/ the topic, Im obsessed w/ the sociological experiment of how absurd you are.
    Entire countries and societies, the very civilization of man has spent much effort trying to solve the issue of being barefoot, yet you feel thats something that worthy of spending your time on? haha. wow.
    Youre right. How another human being dresses is not my concern, and it never was. Your misrepresentation once again.
    PS thanks for my daily laugh.
    you never answered: if you’re one of those extreme liberals who tend to end up at UNCA.?

  66. Kriss

    “…Im obsessed w/ the sociological experiment of how absurd you are.”

    What? That statement doesn’t even make sense. But what I think you are trying to say is:

    1. You think I’m conducting a sociological experiment.
    2. You think what I’m doing is absurd.
    3. You are obsessed with both of the above.

    Well, I agree that you are obsessed; otherwise you’d just let this go. This thread was pretty much done a long time ago after the former owner of Eaties had posted her response to the many comments posted. As to my only issue with the restaurant, she apologized for posting the unwelcoming sign, which apparently was based on a misunderstanding of health code requirements. So, except for a few follow-up comments right after that, the discussion was DONE. Yet you came along almost two weeks later and started bringing up all this shoes and shirts stuff all over again. Why do you care?

    “Entire countries and societies, the very civilization of man has spent much effort trying to solve the issue of being barefoot…”

    There is no “issue of being barefoot” that has needed to be “solve[d].” Man was created by God – or by Nature, whatever you may believe – barefoot. Many societies have functioned just fine without shoes – and still do – from the dawn of time. Shoes were originally created as tools, like gloves, to be used where needed for protection when necessary, not to be worn routinely all the time. Later they became more of a status symbol than anything else – a way to separate the haves from the have-nots. In the last 50 or 60 years, a billion dollar shoe industry has pretty much convinced most of the world, and especially the United States, that shoes are needed at all times from the cradle to the grave. A lot of economic interests are riding on keeping that idea in everyone’s mind. They’ve succeeded, because nowadays pretty much everyone is convinced they simply MUST have shoes on their feet at all times.

    “Youre right. How another human being dresses is not my concern, and it never was.”

    If it’s not your concern, then why do you keep complaining about what others may or may not be wearing and making such a big deal about it?

  67. John

    I said i dont want to eat beside ppl w/ no shoes/shirt, I never complained otherwise. once again ur inserting words I never said. You must love arguing w/ yourself.
    I also enjoy how almost every explanation you give w/ all the ‘bla bla’ reasoning etc. is very obvious facts anyone would know, IE all that shoe stuff.
    Also, I let it go on my 2nd post here, when I said I don’t know anything about foodservice laws. The rest has been amazement at your degree of self involvement & arrogance.
    The soc. exp. quip was saying Im having fun seeing how absurd you are. It’s great.
    PS You never answered my question, is it because my friends guess about you is correct?

    Malcolm Forbes:
    The dumbest people I know are those who know it all.

  68. John

    PS To anyone else reading, I apologize this frankenstein-like transformation and pillaging of of an innocent forum.

  69. Kriss

    “I said i dont want to eat beside ppl w/ no shoes/shirt, I never complained otherwise.”

    So that means you’d never allow anyone barefoot or shirtless in your kitchen or dining room at home, right?

    You know, there’s really nothing wrong with your free will choice of whom you want to associate with or be around. It’s just that when you’re out in public, you have no right to tell someone else he or she has no right to be there just because they don’t meet your own personal “standards.” Just keep in mind there’s a lot of diversity in American society, and if you can’t accept, or at least tolerate, people around you who may look or dress differently from you, it’s your own problem to deal with, not the problem of those who are different from you.

    “PS You never answered my question, is it because my friends guess about you is correct?”

    I’m not sure what question you’re referring to, because as I look back at your two posts previous to your last one, I count a total of nine questions asked. Most are just silly or rhetorical, so I generally ignored them. Perhaps you could repeat the question you say I didn’t answer, and I’ll try to answer if I can.

  70. John

    Which question you ask? Shows how much attention you pay to whats being said, obviously none.

    Same w/ the clarification of ‘stranger’ that I made that I wouldnt eat beside. In my own kitchen? Yet another of your assumptions which create being so out of sync w/ things ive said the entire time.

    You certainly assume quite a bit out of a simple statement, such as me wanting to force others to dress like me, bla bla bla. Wow. Im certain your life would be much simpler if you’d cut out all of the excess things you hear when ppl say things. Thats whats fascinating.

  71. Kriss

    So are you going to tell me what the question is that’s so important that you get an answer to from me, or are you just going to continue to gripe and complain?

  72. John

    Gripe? Complain? I dont think the dictionary definitions of those words fit my comments. Possibly for my 2nd post, so ‘continue’ is unfitting also.
    There’s only one question which mentioned anything about one of my friends. If I refer back to that though, it may just rile you up again. Tho I am interested in its accuracy.

  73. Kriss

    When you keep complaining about how you don’t like my answers or responses to your comments, instead of logically and clearly stating your points of disagreement and rebuttal, and you pepper all that with sarcastic or what appears to be rhetorical questions, there’s no way to tell what seriously needs to answered or not.

    So once again, either ask the question you keep talking about, or stop talking about it. I told you I’d try to answer if it’s all that important to you.

  74. Halley

    Hey uh,
    You opened a CEREAL BAR. And you bought your cereal at full price from EARTH FARE (I was your cashier. I know this.) Anyone with half a brain would know that cereal is ridiculously expensive when you buy it at full price from one of the most ridiculously expensive health food chains around. You bought bulk, but took it from the bulk bins instead of ordering a case at the ten percent discount (which I told you about… twice) and you bought our expensive soy milk AT FULL PRICE. I’m not a restauranteur, but I certainly know how to get a better deal than that. I’m not the biggest fan of Asheville, myself, but yuppification isn’t your problem. Your problem is called stupid.

  75. Halley

    oh, and:
    If I walked into a restaurant and there were people inside who weren’t wearing shoes, I wouldn’t want to eat there. It’s disgusting. ‘Nuff said.

  76. Kriss

    If the sight of a normal, natural human foot is so disgusting to you, then you obviously have a rather distorted and sick view of the human body. That means you would be equally disgusted if you walked into a restaurant and saw people inside wearing flip-flops, for there is no practical difference, as just as much of the foot is visible. Not that most people are going to be crawling around on the floor looking under tables checking out other people’s feet.

  77. Halley

    I don’t think feet are disgusting, dude. I think bare feet in a restaurant is disgusting. Seeing how adamant you’ve been about your foot defense, I think you might be the one with the er… skewed idea of the human body.

  78. John

    Hey Halley. Great simple comment. You’re the coolest. I want to meet you.

  79. Kriss

    “I don’t think feet are disgusting, dude. I think bare feet in a restaurant is disgusting.”

    What you said doesn’t really make much sense. If bare feet are not disgusting to you, how do they suddenly become disgusting just because they happen to be in a restaurant? Would they be similarly digusting to you in your own dining room or kitchen at home where food is also served?

    Bare feet in a restaurant or any other business are no different from feet with shoes on – they touch *nothing* but the floor. So, I don’t see how that could possibly be a problem for you or anyone else.

    What somebody else wears or doesn’t wear, as long as no laws are being broken, should not be anyone else’s concern. We live in a very diverse society nowadays, especially in Asheville, and if you choose to be intolerant and unaccepting of others who are different from you, it’s your own problem that you just have to deal with, I suppose.

  80. Kriss

    “You’re the coolest. I want to meet you.”

    LOL, John. Yeah, y’all need to hook up. You’d make a great couple I’m sure! ;)

  81. John

    Ya never know. Kriss, you and I would make a good couple to keep the local police busy with domestic dispute cases. Sweet. :)

  82. Kriss

    I hate to break it to you, John, but since I’m not female and certainly not gay, I doubt we’d ever make a good couple regardless of the reason. I think your best hope is going to be with Halley. ;)

  83. John

    Thats why our disputes would be that much more interesting. It’d be like a Reno 911 episode.

  84. Kriss

    Yes, well, don’t get your hopes up. The chances of our disputes going anywhere beyond this comment forum are pretty much non-existent.

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