Jerry Sternberg

An unvarnishe­d look at affordable housing: The Gospel According to Jerry

“As soon as outraged neighbors show up at municipal meetings screaming and shouting about traffic, quality of life and property values, our elected officials quietly slide down in their chairs and hide their faces behind their computer screens, concealing their shame about discouraging developers, both public and private, from increasing our woefully inadequate housing inventory.”

PLACE TO CALL HOME: Jimmy Yamin of Workforce Homestead described plans for a 70-unit affordable apartment complex in Candler off Smokey Park Highway on April 10. Asheville City Council approved Yamin's zoning request unanimously and also approved a $600,000 loan from the city's Affordable Housing Trust Fund in support of the project. Photo by Virginia Daffron

City sustainabi­lity efforts fall short of annual goal in 2017

After years of progress toward waste and carbon emission reduction goals, the city hit a wall in 2017, according to a report presented to Asheville City Council on April 10. Asked for bright ideas about how sustainability efforts can get back on track to achieve long-term goals, city staffers said that, without significant additional investment, progress is likely to be limited to incremental gains.