HAYWOOD ROAD CORRIDOR: On Nov. 28 City Council voted to not permit lodging of 20 rooms or fewer as a use by right in all the districts covered under the Haywood Road form-based code. The impetus behind the move includes concerns over potential negative impacts of whole-house, short-term rentals on the housing market. Image courtesy of the city of Asheville

City bans most lodging along Haywood Road

Coming on the heels of the city blocking short-term rentals in the River Arts District, City Council voted against allowing such lodging throughout the Haywood Road corridor. At its Nov. 28 meeting, City Council placed heavy restrictions on lodging along Haywood Road in West Asheville, specifically targeting whole-unit short-term rentals such as those offered through Airbnb.

LODGING LIMITS: To illustrate what lodging uses will not be allowed in the Haywood Road corridor, during the City Council meeting, City Planner Alan Glines drew a line through each instance of "P" for permitted in the "20 rooms or less" portion of this use table for all districts.  Image courtesy of the city of Asheville

City Council talks tough on short-term lodging

Asheville City Council appears committed to holding the city’s line on any potential expansion of short-term rentals. Council members put the kibosh on a proposal to allow short-term rentals on a stretch of Haywood Road in West Asheville, while also instructing city staff to explore banning the practice in all areas of the city, including the River Arts District and downtown. Homestays, a type of accommodation where the primary resident is home during a guest’s short-term stay, would remain legal.

BRIDGE OVER TROUBLED WATER: While community members largely spoke out in favor of Alternative 4B for Section B of the I-26 Connector Project, several aspects of NCDOT’s design, such as the three bridges that would span the French Broad River near Montford (above), have a coalition of Montford neighbors and others questioning the scale and scope of the design. Image via NCDOT; courtesy of DWAC

Despite progress, concerns about the I-26 Connector persist

When the DOT finally decided on a design for Section B of the Connector project in 2015, many stakeholders thought they saw light at the end of a very long tunnel. Other residents, however, see serious flaws in Alternative 4B, questioning whether the project’s long-term benefits will justify the sacrifices their neighborhoods must make to see it completed.

WEST ASHEVILLE: The illustration was drawn around 1883. Photo courtesy of Dr. David E. Whisnant

Tuesday History: The sulphur springs of West Asheville

This week’s Tuesday History comes courtesy of Dr. David E. Whisnant. On his blog, Asheville Junction, the historian and Asheville native revisits West Asheville prior to the Civil War. He tells the little known story of Revolutionary War veteran Robert Henry, who in 1827 discovered a sulphur spring within the present-day boundary of Malvern Hills. By […]