Cranky Hanke’s Screening Room: The Thursday Night Horror Picture Show

It’s rare that I have actual news in the Screening Room, but this time I do because starting on Thursday, April 22 at 8 p.m. my partner in cinematic doings, Justin Souther, and I will be screening Stuart Gordon’s Re-Animator (1985) in the mezzanine lounge of the Carolina Asheville to kick off our weekly Thursday Night Horror Picture Show. Yes, that’s right. Every Thursday at 8 p.m. we will be introducing and screening horror pictures at the Carolina. And if anyone is interested, we’ll be glad to discuss the films afterwards. In the immortal words of Groucho Marx, “Let there be dancing in the streets, drinking in the saloons and necking in the parlors.”

Here are a few of the basics. Yes, the films are free to the public (that doesn’t mean that the theater would mind if viewers bought some concessions). Yes, we both plan on being at the showings—this, of course, may on occasion be impossible (I have an alarming tendency to get snowed in, which shouldn’t be a concern for a while), but at least one of us will be there. Yes, we are looking for input as to what we will be showing. Right now the first nine weeks are programmed. (See below.) It’s a mix of modern and classic horror—the idea being to cover the spectrum of horror movies. Nothing is really out of bounds, though we have no plans of dipping into “torture porn,” and personally I’ve no desire to run either version of The Wicker Man. We may occasionally stretch the definition of horror a bit to include hybrids, but the overall content will be horor movies.

Why did we choose Re-Animator for our first film? Well, partly because it’s a known quantity and it has a following and is a lot of fun. It’s also a beautiful example—if you really stop to look at it—of what can be accomplished on a very small budget. Moreover, we realilzed—somewhat to our surprise—that no one has ever run it before locally, so it was about time. Also, it’s not 70-odd years old and we thought we’d start with something a little more modern. It’s our fiendish plan to ease viewers into appreciating those movies that might be outside the realm of modern tastes and trends. Of course—though it doesn’t seem like it to me—“more modern” in this case is a movie that’s 25 years old. At the same time, you won’t find anything made since then that’s more outrageous—and the only thing I can think of that’s bloodier is Peter Jackson’s Dead Alive (1992).

Our second choice is Alan Parker’s Angel Heart (1987)—a much underrated film in my book. It caused quite a stir at the time for a very bizarre—and deeply disturbing—sex scene between Mickey Rourke (before he became an embarassment and had to work through a comeback) and Lisa Bonet. Much was made of the fact that the scene had to be trimmed to get an R rating. That this trimming consisted of a few seconds of Mickey Rourke’s backside seemed kind of silly when the “director’s cut” hit home video. Regardless, the film would be remarkable for its atmosphere alone, but this intricate, symbol-laden, diabolic thriller has more than that going for it. It is particularly interesting right now because it has elements in common with Scorsese’s Shutter Island—though here played for pure horror.

Having lulled you into a sense of gore-laden security, we’re then offering up a Karloff and Lugosi double feature from the classic era, The Black Cat (1934) and The Raven (1935). (Since these are from the days when movies weren’t necessarily very long, the pair of them is only about 20 minutes longer than Angel Heart by itself.)  The first is indeed a classic. Better still, The Black Cat is that rarest of creatures in that it’s managed to remain controversial for (at this point) 76 years. It’s either considered one of the best horror movies ever made, or it’s considered a tasteless, disjointed mess that’s interesting only for its stars. We (I think I can speak for both of us here) are in the first group.

Like its companion piece, Edgar G. Ulmer’s The Black Cat has little or nothing to do with its supposed Edgar Allan Poe source (“suggested by” is the term used on the credits). Rather, it’s a twisted tale of revenge involving a prisoner of war (Lugosi) returning after 15 years in a Russian prison to reclaim his wife and daughter from the traitor, mass-murderer and Satanist (Karloff), who stole them from him. And that’s merely the premise. The details are macabre in the extreme. It flies in the face of convention at every turn, starting with the “old dark house” we expect turning out to be a sleekly modern Bauhaus style creation—literally built on a graveyard (“The murderer of 10,000 men returns to the place of his crime”). The dialogue is rich, every shot is gauged for maximum impact, the all-classical musical score is brilliantly used—and neither Karloff (at his most unsympathetic) nor Lugosi (in an unusual, heartbreakingly tragic role) have ever been better.

The Raven, on the other hand, is best viewed as enjoyable trash that may have been partly intended as a straight-faced spoof. It’s certainly preposterous enough. A barometer of this can be found in the scene where unhinged medico Lugosi reveals how he has disfigured gangster Karloff in an operation supposedly to make him look “good.” First of all, since Karloff was presumably unconscious during this procedure, one wonders why Lugosi didn’t relieve him of his gun. Instead, he has him in a room with six mirrors—each covered with a remote control curtain, so he can unveil his handiwork and enrage his victim into emptying his gat by blasting each of the mirrors. Well, that’s the kind of movie it is.

The film was directed by Louis Friedlander, whose only previous credit was directing a serial—and it shows. (Frieldlander would soon change his name to Lew Landers, under which alias he would continue to crank out thoroughly undistinguished movies.) The dialogue is delightfully ripe. At one point Lugosi reminds Karloff of that moment in his crininal career where Karloff disfigured a bank guard by putting “the burning acetylene torch into his face—into his eyes!” Karloff’s excuse? “Well, sometimes you can’t help things like that.” Sounds reasonable. Unique in that it’s the only film that gave Lugosi the special last-name-only billing the studio had been affording Karloff, the film is also of his some historical significance since its cheerful sadism was a key factor in calling down the wrath of the blue-noses that would help bring about a moratorium on horror movies from 1936 to 1939.

Up next is William Peter Blatty’s The Exorcist III (1990)—a vastly superior and more persuasive movie William Friedkin’s film of Blatty’s novel (and screenplay) of The Exorcist (1973). This one is based on Blatty’s sequel novel Legion and solidifies Blatty’s status as a natural filmmaker—something his 1980 film The Ninth Configuration had indicated. The film is incredibly creepy, brilliantly written and magnificently acted—George C. Scott, Brad Dourif and Ed Flanders are especially good. (In fact, I defy anyone to watch Dourif in this film and not suspect that Heath Ledger was very familiar with the performance when he played the Joker.) Exorcist III is a rare instance of where studio interference actually improved a film, since Blatty originaly shot the ending from his book, which was fine on paper but rather flat in dramatics. They forced him to come up with a more dynamic climax—and he did. One of the most underrated horror films of all time.

Horror of a very different sort is on tap with Ken Russell’s Gothic (1987)—a psychological phantasmagoria that details the weekend in Switzerland that caused Mary Shelley (Natasha Richardson) to write Frankenstein. Do not, however, expect a history lesson—though the essentials are historically accurate (give or take)—since Russell is more interested in the psychcology of the wild, laudanum-soaked house party that spawned her book than in a realistic depiction. It’s very over-the-top, heavily laden with symbolism, full of small touches (note carefully that Mary Shelley is the only character not stoned out of her mind) and utterly nightmarish. All this and a pretty terrific Thomas Dolby musical score too.

What could you possibly follow up Gothic with but James Whale’s Frankenstein (1931)? Yes, it’s the original classic monster show—and if you’ve only ever seen it in battered and censored TV prints, then you’ve never really seen it. Restored to its original version and luster, Frankenstein is a remarkble film that more than justifies its reputation. While it’s certainly not the first horror movie, it is the first one that plays its shocks for shocks—in fact it can be said that Whale invented the shock cut with this movie. It mayn’t be Whale’s masterpiece—his subsequent forays into the fantastic all outrank it in their ways—but it does benefit in horror terms by being the most straight-faced of his quartet of horror pictures. It’s also the most disturbing depiction of the Frankenstein Monster (Karloff) in any film. Here the Monster looks truly cadaverous in a way that he never did subsequently. By the time of Bride of Frankenstein (1935) Karloff’s face had filled out considerably and the impact was greatly lessened. (This is what happens when you turn character actors into stars and let them eat regularly, I suppose.)

We’re back with Ken Russell after that with his horror film—and horror film parody—The Lair of the White Worm (1988), based somewhat loosely on Bram Stoker’s final novel of the same name. Often considered lesser Russell, the film is perhaps more complex than it seems—and it’s the film that introduced a new generation to the filmmaker’s work. Made on the cheap (the delightfully cartoonish title “worm” boasts a gaping mouth fashioned from the front of a Volkswagen Beetle) with a fresh-faced cast—including a very young Hugh Grant—the movie has its horror and makes sport of it too. Largely shot by Russell himself (often with a hand-held camera that proves not all such approaches require an attack of St. Vitus’ Dance), it’s more fun than anything else, but there are deeper undercurrents if you’re willing to look for them.

No smorgasbord of horror would be complete (not that this first sampler group attempts that) without at least one Hammer horror picture. For this we’ve chosen a rather lesser known title, Terence Fisher’s The Gorgon (1964) starring Hammer’s version of Karloff and Lugosi, Peter Cushing and Christopher Lee. While Cushing is perhaps not as well used here as he is many of their vehicles, this gets my vote for Lee’s best performance in any Hammer film. The film itself—some dodgy special effects to one side—is an atmospheric new take on the old Greek myth that somehow transports Medusa’s even nastier sister, Magera, to turn of the century Germany, where she’s taken on lycanthropic properties causing her to pop up during the full moon in one of those conveniently desereted castles that horror movies have an endless supply of. No, it may not make complete sense, but it’s marvelously effective horror—beautifully lit in unrealistic fairy tale colors and directed with great panache.

Speaking of not making complete sense, we close out this first set with Michael Winner’s much-maligned The Sentinel (1977)—a film that was dismissed (“Michael Winner squirts gore across the screen for 90 minutes,” noted one review) and reviled (largely for casting actual deformed people as denizens of hell) upon its original release. It very much deserves a second look. Yes, Winner indeed “squirts gore across the screen,” but he seems to be having a fine, over-the-top time doing so. And if you don’t examine film too closely—the plot doesn’t make a lot of sense to begin with and boasts an incredible plot hole that’s hard to miss—it’s effectively creepy stuff with a few knockout horror set pieces. Plus, where else are you going to see Chris Sarandon, Burgess Meredith, John Carradine, Ava Gardner, Arthur Kennedy, Sylvia Miles, Beverly D’Angelo, Christopher Walken and Jeff Goldblum all packed into one movie?

So there you have our first nine screenings and our first 10 movies. We think it will thrill you. It may shock you. It might even horrify you. But we really hope you’ll come out in support of the project. It’s free and it should be fun. The more people who show up, the more fun it will be. Plus, if we get enough support, it’s possible we may be able to commandeer an actual theater for the films—though the cinema lounge is pretty darn nice in itself. Moreover, this series is meant to pave the way for an even more ambitious series of alternate movie programming—about which I can say no more at present.

All movies start at 8 p.m.
April 22—Re-Animator (1985)
April 29—Angel Heart (1987)
May 6—The Black Cat (1934) / The Raven (1935) Double Feature (both run around 60 minutes in length)
May 13—Exorcist III (1990)
May 20—Gothic (1986)
May 27—Frankenstein (1931)
June 3—The Lair of the White Worm (1988)
June 10—The Gorgon (1964)
June 17—The Sentinel (1977)

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About Ken Hanke
Head film critic for Mountain Xpress from December 2000 until his death in June 2016. Author of books "Ken Russell's Films," "Charlie Chan at the Movies," "A Critical Guide to Horror Film Series," "Tim Burton: An Unauthorized Biography of the Filmmaker."

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59 thoughts on “Cranky Hanke’s Screening Room: The Thursday Night Horror Picture Show

  1. Steph

    Great choices! Especially the underrated ANGEL HEART. Be sure to tell people to watch the credits to the very end.

    Also Exorcist III has the most frightening shock moment, I think, I’ve ever seen in a horror film. It’s right up there with the end of CARRIE and the head popping out of the boat in JAWS.

  2. Ken Hanke

    How about showing Tod Browning’s Freaks?

    Assuming we get enough support with older movies to keep doing this, it seems an inevitable choice.

  3. Ken Hanke

    Also Exorcist III has the most frightening shock moment, I think, I’ve ever seen in a horror film. It’s right up there with the end of CARRIE and the head popping out of the boat in JAWS.

    I think it might actually be better than the one in Carrie because of the way it plays the viewer. I don’t have enough familiarity with Jaws (saw it once over 30 years ago) to measure against it.

  4. Chip Kaufmann

    While it saddens me that the one night a week I have a live radio show is the night these screenings will occur, I like your list of films (some old favorites there) and hope that they can draw a significant audience so that other genres and venues can be explored. If they ever get around to silents, let me know.

    My one criticism and it’s a minor one is why two Ken Russell films? Nothing against KR but it would have been nice to slip in another filmmaker like Peter Medak (THE CHANGELING) or one of the Val Lewton films and save WORM for the next batch. Jacques Tourneur’s NIGHT/CURSE OF THE DEMON would also have been a good choice.

  5. Ken Hanke

    Nothing against KR but it would have been nice to slip in another filmmaker like Peter Medak (THE CHANGELING) or one of the Val Lewton films and save WORM for the next batch. Jacques Tourneur’s NIGHT/CURSE OF THE DEMON would also have been a good choice

    I really wanted to run Night of the Demon, but I ruled it out for this batch because I’d already put in three older movies and I didn’t want to push it too far, especially with a movie that’s lacking a major genre actor. It will happen. So likely will The Changeling and Lewton is inevitable, even if I’m not nearly as fond of those as I’m supposed to be.

  6. DrSerizawa

    Dang, you guys are lucky to even have theaters that engage in such shenanigans. In Salt Lake we used to have the Blue Mouse that showed fun stuff and had marathons and such. It got shut down years ago. Now there’s just the Tower and they never show classic Horror. However they do have weird and strange rentals which is something I guess. Fortunately for me I have all of those except AH, Gorgon and Sentinel on DVD already. I’ll just stick Night of the Demons in place of The Gorgon. Too bad it’s not on Netflix.

    Even then I’d rather see them on the big screen in the theater. It’s just not the same at home.

  7. Ken Hanke

    Dang, you guys are lucky to even have theaters that engage in such shenanigans

    Well, it’s ultimately going to depend on audience turnout as to just whether or not these shenanigans will last.

    Fortunately for me I have all of those except AH, Gorgon and Sentinel on DVD already. I’ll just stick Night of the Demons in place of The Gorgon. Too bad it’s not on Netflix

    Don’t know how Netflix handles multi-title sets, but The Gorgon is on Sony’s “Icons of Horror” four movie collection on the same disc as Scream of Fear.

    Even then I’d rather see them on the big screen in the theater. It’s just not the same at home

    This is what I’m hoping people will realize. Granted, we’re going to be in a relatively small space, but it’s still bigger than what anyone I know has at home. Plus, it makes the experience communal and that’s a lot of the kick right there.

  8. Me

    I would like to see The Ninth Configuration I’ve always wanted to check it out.

    What about the Brood, The Man Who Haunted Himself, Audition, The Hitcher, Peeping Tom, Black Sunday

  9. Me

    I would like to see The Ninth Configuration I’ve always wanted to check it out.

    What about the Brood, The Man Who Haunted Himself, Audition, The Hitcher, Peeping Tom, Black Sunday

  10. T.H.X. Pijonsnodt, Esq.

    It’s very over-the-top

    It’s a Ken Russell film. Doesn’t that go without saying?

  11. Ken Hanke

    I would like to see The Ninth Configuration I’ve always wanted to check it out

    That could possibly be worked in on the hybrid basis. It has a certain horror element to it — mostly due to the setting — but it isn’t really a horror picture. I’d certainly have no problem running it.

    What about the Brood, The Man Who Haunted Himself, Audition, The Hitcher, Peeping Tom, Black Sunday

    The Brood most definitely. I’ve never seen The Man Who Haunted Himself or Audition (I’m guessing you mean the Takashi Miike film). The Hitcher is a possibility, though I don’t remember being that impressed with it. I’ve always found Peeping Tom overrated, but it should be shown if only because of its infamous status. And I have to admit I just do not like Bava, but he’s inescapable and Black Sunday is probably his best film.

  12. Ken Hanke

    It’s a Ken Russell film. Doesn’t that go without saying?

    Even with Russell there are relative degrees of over-the-top.

  13. Chip Kaufmann

    While we’re throwing titles out there how about SPIRITS OF THE DEAD, WOLFEN, HOUSE THAT DRIPPED BLOOD, TOURIST TRAP, PSYCHIC KILLER, KILL, BABY, KILL (my Bava pick), THE HAUNTED PALACE (my Corman pick), as well as NOSFERATU (Herzog version maybe someday the original).

  14. Ken Hanke

    While we’re throwing titles out there how about SPIRITS OF THE DEAD, WOLFEN, HOUSE THAT DRIPPED BLOOD, TOURIST TRAP, PSYCHIC KILLER, KILL, BABY, KILL (my Bava pick), THE HAUNTED PALACE (my Corman pick), as well as NOSFERATU (Herzog version maybe someday the original).

    Interesting choices. I’d have to revisit several of these. (Not sure I’ve ever seen Psychic Killer.) Except for the Fellini segment, I’ve never cared for Spirits of the Dead. I do second The Haunted Palace, though. I think my Bava pick would be Black Sabbath if only for “A Drop of Water.” I’d like to do Nosferatu — both versions — though the silent has been shown at least twice locally in the past few years and the Herzog was shown once. I’d go for the silent in a heartbeat if we could find someone who would be interested in playing a live musical accompaniment!

  15. Bob Boeberitz

    How about “Dead of Night?” Not exactly a horror movie, but more of a pscyhological thriller. It’s a quartet of 4 strange stories all tied together by a visit to a country manor which turns out to be a dream…or is it?

  16. Ken Hanke

    How about “Dead of Night?”

    That’s actually an excellent suggestion. It at least qualifies as something of a ghost story on one occcasion, if memory serves.

  17. LYT

    Carnival of Souls would be a good one, if only so people will realize just how many movies in their life they’ve seen that basically rip it off.

  18. Ken Hanke

    Carnival of Souls would be a good one, if only so people will realize just how many movies in their life they’ve seen that basically rip it off.

    Good choice. Good point.

  19. Chip Kaufmann

    I was going to mention CARNIVAL OF SOULS as an older choice.
    SPIRITS OF THE DEAD plays better in the original French and Italian soundtrack although it can be disconcerting.
    The Ultimate Edition NOSFERATU has the original 1922 score which is very effective. Live musicians would cost real money which could be a violation.
    DEAD OF NIGHT is an excellent choice (even with the golf sequence). The mirror and ventriloquist sequences more than qualify.
    Amicus’ last anthology film FROM BEYOND THE GRAVE would bookend nicely with DEAD OF NIGHT.

  20. We just don’t get this kind of thing in Sydney!

    I defy anyone to watch Dourif in this film and not suspect that Heath Ledger was very familiar with the performance when he played the Joker.
    I’ve always suspected he based his portrayal on Tom Waits, but I’ve yet to catch up with any of the Exorcist sequels. I think I’ll give this one a go.

  21. Ken Hanke

    SPIRITS OF THE DEAD plays better in the original French and Italian soundtrack

    That wouldn’t alter Vadim’s approach of zooming in on things, missing the mark and the moving the camera to what he was aiming at.

    Amicus’ last anthology film FROM BEYOND THE GRAVE

    Another of those things I need to re-see.

  22. Ken Hanke

    We just don’t get this kind of thing in Sydney!

    Well, you could always move here, but I have a hunch you’d find the trade-off inequitable.

    I’ve yet to catch up with any of the Exorcist sequels. I think I’ll give this one a go

    The second one is a fascinatng refutation of the first film, but it’s so weird and so not a traditional horror picture… Oddly, however, it can exist without messing up the third film, since it follows the Linda Blair character and the third film focuses on Lt. Kinderman and Damien Karras.

    Blatty, I hear, was quite impressed with Paul Schrader’s Exorcist: Dominion or whatever it’s called. I only saw the Renny Harlin reshoot, which isn’t especially bad (mostly) or particularly good. But I’ve never seen a Schrader picture I liked, so I’m hesitant try that one.

  23. Well, you could always move here, but I have a hunch you’d find the trade-off inequitable.
    Let’s just say that the line “I have an alarming tendency to get snowed in” is not something anyone in my vicinity has ever had to worry about.

    I’ll probably end up living in NYC or LA in a few years anyway, which would make the occasional commute to Asheville a little more affordable.

    The second one is a fascinatng refutation of the first film, but it’s so weird and so not a traditional horror picture
    I’ve heard so many terrible reports of that film that I’ve been reticent to give it a shot. And I’d assumed that the third would be hard to follow without seeing the second. But if it isn’t necessary, I might jump straight to III.

  24. Ken Hanke

    Let’s just say that the line “I have an alarming tendency to get snowed in” is not something anyone in my vicinity has ever had to worry about

    That may be, but if you go to NYC that’s not necessarily going to remain true.

    I’ll probably end up living in NYC or LA in a few years anyway, which would make the occasional commute to Asheville a little more affordable

    More from NYC, which I’d recommend over LA any day.

    I’ve heard so many terrible reports of that film that I’ve been reticent to give it a shot.

    If you’re looking for an Exorcist movie, avoid it. If you’re looking for extremely strange John Boorman art movie, that’s another matter.

    And I’d assumed that the third would be hard to follow without seeing the second. But if it isn’t necessary, I might jump straight to III.

    Whether you’ve seen the second will make no difference whatever.

  25. LYT

    LOS ANGELES POWER.

    If you love movies, this is the place. Tarantino owns a rep theater out here that shows double-features every night, including original grindhouse movies once a month.

    Gimme a holler if you make it to the wild west coast.

  26. Sean Williams

    Even with Russell there are relative degrees of over-the-top.

    The scale is defined by the volume of baked beans (in cubic meters) necessary to fill the principle sets.

  27. Ken Hanke

    Tarantino owns a rep theater out here that shows double-features every night

    Problem is it’s in LA. Actually, I haven’t been to LA since 1991, so I’m not gonna strongly argue this whole thing.

  28. Ken Hanke

    The scale is defined by the volume of baked beans (in cubic meters) necessary to fill the principle sets

    The sets in Gothic could hold a lot of beans.

  29. Ken Hanke

    Great line-up, best of luck to you!

    Thanks. We certainly need the support of film fans.

  30. contentpersephone

    this is such a great idea!
    love it…and the lineup.
    now I have to find a baby sitter who can do a few of these thursday nights.
    at the very least….I must must must re-see “gothic” – it’s been too long. angel heart would also be fun.
    see you soon!

  31. Ken Hanke

    at the very least….I must must must re-see “gothic” – it’s been too long. angel heart would also be fun.
    see you soon!

    Yes, please do come to some of these. As I said, the success of this undertaking is going to depend on people taking advantage of it.

  32. Ajay

    This is awesome, I’m really excited about this! Just another reason on my list of why Carolina Cinemas is the ONLY place to go in the area.

    It would be amazing to see the original HALLOWEEN on a theater screen.

    GEORGE ROMERO’S ZOMBIE films.

    I second the NOSFERATU suggestion. (Original, silent film)

  33. Ken Hanke

    It would be amazing to see the original HALLOWEEN on a theater screen.

    Even though I’ve never warmed to this one, it’s certainly a possibility, as are the Romero films (Day of the Dead doesn’t get enough recognition).

  34. Ken Hanke

    Any chance on getting Cannibal Holocaust?

    Anything is possible, I suppose, if enough people request it, though I object to this film just in principle.

    What about the Mondo Cane films or would that be to inappropriate?

    I’d say they’re inappropriate and I don’t see much of a call for them either. That may just be because I have less than zero interest in this sort of thing. In fact, I’m pretty much repulsed by it.

  35. Ajay

    Yes! Day of the Dead is by far the best! If you screen that I will be there wearing my Bub T-shirt and I’ll be giddy as a schoolgirl for it!

  36. Ken Hanke

    Yes! Day of the Dead is by far the best! If you screen that I will be there wearing my Bub T-shirt and I’ll be giddy as a schoolgirl for it!

    We may have to do it just to see that!

  37. Agnes Cheek

    They, The Body Snatchers, Them, The Blob, The Thing, Night of the Living Dead, the Wolfman with Lon Chaney, anything Vincent Price, Godzilla, night of the Lepus, Attack of the Killer Tomatoes, Kujo, the Creature from the Black lagoon, IT, The Shining, ….gosh, I could list these all night..

    These might be a bit much, some of them.
    Most of these were ones that I remember watching when I was growing up, some of them you mentioned in the article.
    What a great idea! This is just what we need around here and I will do my best to help it take off by bringing folks along with me :) (not that i think that would be much of a problem-it taking off) Im psyched! and yes this is coming from a gal with Justine from Frankenstein tattooed on her forearm swayyyyying in the breeze…

    As for more modern films, 28 days later is also a great example of well done low budget movie. the zombies-that-weren’t-exactly-zombies in it scared the heck outta me!

  38. Ken Hanke

    The Body Snatchers, The Blob, The Thing, Night of the Living Dead

    All of these bring up the question of which one? The first has three versions and the others all have remakes.

  39. Bob Boeberitz

    What about the horror comedies: Abbott & Costello Meet Frankenstein, Scared Stiff (Martin & Lewis), Young Frankenstein (Mel Brooks)?

    Or: The Haunting (Robert Wise, w/Richard Johnson, Juile Harris) and House of Wax (Vincent Price)

  40. Ken Hanke

    What about the horror comedies: Abbott & Costello Meet Frankenstein, Scared Stiff (Martin & Lewis), Young Frankenstein (Mel Brooks)?

    Well, apart from the cruelty of infliction Martin and Lewis on people (could we compromise on the 1940 Bob Hope version, The Ghost Breakers?) there’s nothing preventing it. Actually, a case could be made that Re-Animator and Lair of the White Worm are horror comedies.

    Or: The Haunting (Robert Wise, w/Richard Johnson, Juile Harris) and House of Wax (Vincent Price)

    Again, if enough people want them, yes. I’d much rather run Mystery of the Wax Museum than House of Wax myself.

  41. Ken Hanke

    Polanski’s Repulsion??? Cemetery Man!!!

    My only qualm is that both of these have been run in the not too distant past by World Cinema. Doesn’t mean we couldn’t if there’s interest, though.

  42. davidf

    Any David Cronenberg? What would you choose?

    And would you consider showing any Stephen King adaptations? And what?

  43. Ken Hanke

    Any David Cronenberg? What would you choose?

    At some point certainly. And my first response is Videodrome.

    And would you consider showing any Stephen King adaptations? And what?

    Carrie is a given. I’d say The Shining, too, but it ran recently at World Cinema and drew a small audiene — despite being talked about a lot on here. Maybe The Dead Zone — that gets Cronenberg and King at one time.

  44. Ken Hanke

    How about Witchfinder General?

    I think I may be the only person on earth who is unimpressed by this movie, but if you’ll come, we’ll run it.

  45. I think I may be the only person on earth who is unimpressed by this movie
    Well, you and t’other Ken.

    but if you’ll come, we’ll run it.
    Oh, I intend to make it to one of these, but with the state of my finances, it won’t be for a year or two, so this thing better have legs.

  46. Ken Hanke

    Well, you and t’other Ken.

    I think we have different reasons, though.

    Oh, I intend to make it to one of these, but with the state of my finances, it won’t be for a year or two, so this thing better have legs

    Let us hope…

  47. Ken Hanke

    I’m delighted to report that we had a very strong turnout for Re-Animator. In fact, chairs had to be brought in and some folks were even sitting in the floor. And everyone seemed to have a pretty good time. Hopefully, this bodes well.

    I won’t say we went off entirely hitch-free. There are a couple things we could improve on, but for our maiden voyage, I think we did pretty well. And I definitely want to thank everyone who came out for this. Now, if you’ll just keep coming!

  48. Ken Hanke

    discussion afterward would’ve been cool, maybe next time?

    I offered it at the beginning, but it didn’t happen — except for people coming up to discuss it individually. We’ll try to encourage it next time.

  49. Rob Ridenour

    I’m having a blast watching these old classic horror films. I’ve been to all three so far. Well I had to leave after the Black Cat showing but since the main spokesperson said the Raven wasn’t that good I figured I’d live since I have some exam studying to do.

    Can’t wait for next week’s showing of Exorcist III!!!!!!!!

  50. Ken Hanke

    Well I had to leave after the Black Cat showing but since the main spokesperson said the Raven wasn’t that good I figured I’d live since I have some exam studying to do.

    The spokesperson woulda been me. And I’m kinda sorry you didn’t invest the 62 minutes in The Raven. It indeed isn’t “that good” — especially as filmmaking compared to The Black Cat — but it’s a special kind of not that good.

    In any case, I look forward to seeing you at Exorcist III.

  51. sisterdiscordia

    you know I am there every time. And I will bring the masses. I say HAMMER FILMS…and thank you for the other two that will be played hopefully soon!!! wink. this is the most wonderful thing in the world. I hope this can branch out into a cult, foreign, fantasy/sci-fi, nights,,,,fingers crossed.

  52. Rob Ridenour

    Good showing tonight of the Exorcist III!!!! I had the best seat in the house with the man next to me jumping at every scare.

    Why is it that the first Exorcist is starting to become a dark comedy and with each new viewing of Exorcist III it gets scarier and scarier. And it’s just a much deeper and well made film in my opinion.

    Look forward next week to Gothic which I’ve never seen.

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