LAY OFFS: Asheville Citizen-Times laid off nine employees, including six reporters, this past Tuesday, Oct. 25.

Reactions to Asheville Citizen-Times recent layoffs

Gannett is in the process of reducing its workforce by 2 percent, CEO Bob Dickey announced on Oct. 24. As part of the media giant’s cuts, the Asheville Citizen-Times laid off nine full-time employees yesterday. In its article announcing the layoff, the newspaper wrote: The majority of the layoffs were in the newsroom, including several veterans: Tony Kiss, the paper’s Beer […]

Council member Cecil Bothwell (far right) reads a proclamation declaring Oct. 28 "Hispanic Restaurateur Day" in the city. Photo by Virginia Daffron

Communicat­ion breakdown: city staff called to account for edible park miscues

City staff were called to account for a communication failure that led to the removal of mature fruit trees at George Washington Carver Edible Park last month. City Council approved a land use incentive grant for affordable housing on Simpson Street, amended the process for requesting a variance from the city’s signage ordinance and approved modest changes to the rules that govern downtown street performances.

82 basin at Duke Energy's Lake Julian plant is free of coal ash and now being readied for its next use as the site of the utility's planned new natural gas-fired generating facility. Photo by Virginia Daffron

Duke Energy shows off excavated ash basin at Lake Julian plant

Duke Energy operating personnel and communications representatives proudly showed off the newly excavated 82 basin at the company’s Lake Julian power plant to local media on Tuesday, Oct. 25. The former coal ash pond is now being readied for its next act: the site of the utility’s new natural gas-fired plant, which is scheduled to begin operations in 2020.

Sparrow Pants and Keith Smith of The Resonant Rogues busking at the Flat Iron on Battery Park Ave. and Wall St. Photo by Erin Derham, Buskin' Blues.

New busker regulation­s up for Council’s considerat­ion at Oct. 25 meeting

On Tuesday, Oct. 25, Asheville City Council will consider new rules that would limit acoustic performances in two of the city’s most popular busking areas, the sidewalk on Haywood Street in front of Woolworth Walk and the Flat Iron at Battery Park Avenue and Wall Street. Also: a grant to support affordable housing development on Simpson Street and a change to the city’s signage ordinance.

Conference keynote speaker, Michelle Lanier.

Third Annual African Americans in WNC Conference happens next week

The third annual African Americans in Western North Carolina Conference is scheduled for Thursday through Sunday, Oct. 27-30 at the YMI Cultural Center downtown and the University of North Carolina Asheville Sherrill Center. The conference activities are free and open to everyone, and include a reception at 6:30 p.m. Thursday, panel discussions and documentary films […]

BIG DECISIONS: Asheville voters will weigh in on three separate bond measures: $32 million for transportation projects, including road repaving, sidewalks, bus shelters, traffic-calming measures and greenways; $25 million for affordable housing, including $15 million to repurpose city-owned land for affordable housing and $10 million for the city’s affordable housing trust fund; and $17 million for parks and recreation projects. Graphic assembled by Scott Southwick

Asheville leaders and organizati­ons weigh in on bond choice

City-sponsored early polling indicated that a solid majority of Asheville voters say they will vote for the proposed $74 million city bond referendum on this year’s general election ballots, and far more local groups and organizations have lined up to support the bond than to criticize it. As with any issue, however, opinion is mixed.

Tibetan Monks of Drepung Loseling Monastery

Weekend Picks: Friday, Oct. 21 – Sunday, Oct. 23

Whether you are raring to go to the Women & Money Conference, a scary open mic, a benefit in a castle, or a low country boil, Asheville has you covered this weekend! Check out this list of weekend highlights and visit the Mountain Xpress Community Calendar for a complete list of weekend events! FRIDAY ‘SCARY […]

BOOM TOWN: Shown here around 1929, Pack Square at that time was ringed by the 1926 Asheville City Hall, the 1903 and 1928 Buncombe County courthouses, Pack Memorial Library, Legal Building, Central Bank & Trust, Commerce Building, Westall Building and Jackson Building. Photo by George Masa, provided courtesy of the North Carolina Collection, Pack Memorial Public Library

Asheville’s bond fears: The legacy of a financial nightmare

Has Asheville recovered from the trauma of its municipal debt crisis, which spanned the years between 1930 and 1976? The debt had a profound impact on Asheville’s development, its cityscape and, lastingly, its appetite for municipal debt. This year’s $74 million bond referendum will put the city’s confidence to the test when it asks voters to choose whether it’s time for the city to borrow again to finance growth.

GLIMPSE OF THE PAST: The WNC Military History Museum will open its "Operation Armed Forces" exhibit honoring veterans from World War I to the present day at the Aethelwold Hotel in Brevard on Saturday, Oct. 22. The exhibit will run through Nov. 11. Photo courtesy of WNC Military History Museum

WNC Military History Museum opens “Operation Armed Forces” exhibit in Brevard Oct. 22

Using a vast array of artifacts, period newspapers and personal items from the time, combined with a series of lectures by military veterans and authorities, The WNC Military History Museum in Brevard hopes to educate a new generation on veterans’ contributions in an upcoming exhibit, “Operation Armed Forces,” which will open Saturday, Oct. 22, and run through Friday, Nov. 11, at the historic Aethelwold Hotel in downtown Brevard.