Mission Health CEO Dr. Ron Paulus shares his rationale behind the health system's intended sale to Hospital Corporation of America.

Mission Health sale could create massive community nonprofit

HCA’s purchase price for the system, plus Mission’s remaining net cash and investments, would fund a nonprofit foundation specifically devoted to boosting public health in the region. At a meeting of the Council of Independent Business Owners, President and CEO Ron Paulus claimed that the new organization’s assets, which could range from $1 billion to $2 billion depending on the final sale price, would make it one of the three largest foundations in North Carolina and the richest foundation per capita anywhere on the planet.

IT TAKES A VILLAGE: YWCA Chief Program Officer Sala Menaya-Merrit speaks during the Board of Commissioners meeting on June 5. Commissioners announced two new early childhood education initiatives during the meeting. Photo by David Floyd

County approves GE incentives­, launches new early childhood ed initiative­s

Though breaking news about new Wanda Greene indictments made it hard for elected officials and members of the public to focus on anything else, the Buncombe County Board of Commissioners approved $685,000 in incentives for a planned local investment by GE Aviation and announced two new early childhood education initiatives during its meeting on June 5.

Mission Health CEO Dr. Ron Paulus shares his rationale behind the health system's intended sale to Hospital Corporation of America.

Mission Health sale, policing top conversati­on at CIBO breakfast meeting

Mission Health President and CEO Dr. Ron Paulus sees system expansion through mergers as a nearly inevitable survival tactic in the current healthcare environment. “There are many leaders — not me, but Mayo Clinic and others — that believe within 25 years, there will be maybe four or five health systems in the U.S.,” he said.

BIG EXPENSES: Duke is building two natural gas-fueled electric generating units at Lake Julian south of Asheville to replace its existing coal plant. Duke estimates that project will have an $890 million price tag and the cost to close coal ash basins there will be about $422 million. Photo by Virginia Daffron

Regulators approve lower-than-requested Duke Energy rate increase, impose coal ash penalty

The N.C. Utilities Commission today approved a rate increase requested by Duke Energy Progress. As approved, Duke may charge an average increase of 7.09 percent. The electricity provider also received permission to increase the basic monthly customer charge for residential customers from $11.13 to $14.

PARKING ROW: The Asheville Foundry Inn property backs up to the Mt. Zion Missionary Baptist Church parking lot, where the hotel leases 75 spaces. Photo by Leslie Boyd

Mt. Zion must wait to build new education facility

Relations between Mount Zion Missionary Baptist Church and its new neighbor, Asheville Foundry Inn, have been strained since construction began on the inn two years ago. A judge has now issued a temporary injunction to block the church from commencing construction on a new education building and parking lot improvements, which the hotel says would deprive it of the use of 75 parking spaces it is leasing from the church.

THE LONG ROAD HOME: For older residents of WNC and those like Barb Knight, who has cerebral palsy, finding a suitable and affordable long-term care facility can be a dizzying experience. Luckily, there is a variety of local resources and professionals to help assist in finding the right home for residents and their loved ones. Photo by Max Hunt

Navigating WNC’s long-term care options

Few words have the ability to inspire more fear, frustration and trepidation among older Americans across the country than “nursing home.” But for those confronting the prospect of needing long-term care, a variety of care options and support services across Western North Carolina provides information to help residents find the best care available.

HAYWOOD ROAD CORRIDOR: On Nov. 28 City Council voted to not permit lodging of 20 rooms or fewer as a use by right in all the districts covered under the Haywood Road form-based code. The impetus behind the move includes concerns over potential negative impacts of whole-house, short-term rentals on the housing market. Image courtesy of the city of Asheville

City bans most lodging along Haywood Road

Coming on the heels of the city blocking short-term rentals in the River Arts District, City Council voted against allowing such lodging throughout the Haywood Road corridor. At its Nov. 28 meeting, City Council placed heavy restrictions on lodging along Haywood Road in West Asheville, specifically targeting whole-unit short-term rentals such as those offered through Airbnb.