Photo by Taylor Johnson

Yoga fusion: Virginia Rosenberg finds balance with yoga and qi gong

With countless yoga classes being offered daily in studios and public spaces around Asheville and Western North Carolina, creative local yoga teachers are diversifying. Xpress talked with six yoga teachers who have infused their yoga classes with complementary healing or movement practices to create a unique yogic experience. Virginia Rosenberg teaches dance, qi gong and […]

It starts with the culture: The Culture Change In Aging Network holds monthly public meetings to develop models to empower the next generation of elders to age in community. Picture, left to right, are CCAN members Lina Giltz, Meg Manderson and facilitator Linda Kendall-Fields.

The modern elder: Reclaiming what’s sacred in life’s later stages

From the Get It! Guide: As the boomer generation moves into elderhood, many are realizing what’s at stake when elders are lost from the social fabric. They’re aghast at the realities of our current model of care and are sparking a movement that seeks to redefine the later stages of life — not just for the benefit of elders but for the enrichment of all generations.

GETTING THE POINT: Odom claims that acupuncture and yoga enhance each other. Photo by Taylor Johnson

Yoga fusion: Becca Odom and Chris Jacobs bring together yoga and acupunctur­e

With countless yoga classes being offered daily in studios and public spaces around Asheville and Western North Carolina, creative local yoga teachers are diversifying. Xpress talked with six yoga teachers who have infused their yoga classes with complementary healing or movement practices to create a unique yogic experience. Becca Odom teaches a class where students […]

Photo by Becca Bond

Yoga fusion: Sonya Costello co-teaches a yoga and chocolate workshop for women

Like proverbial peanut butter and jelly, yoga pairs perfectly with other healing modalities, according to several local yoga teachers. With countless yoga classes being offered daily in studios and public spaces around Asheville and Western North Carolina, these creative yogis are diversifying. Xpress talked with five yoga teachers who have infused their yoga classes with […]

The French Broad Co-Op, which is held downtown on Wednesdays, is one of several regional farmers markets that accepts payment through food assistance programs such as EBT.

Welcome to spring: Here’s where to find your neighborho­od tailgate market

Most area markets will be starting up in the next few weeks, though a few — including the Asheville City Market, the WNC Farmers Market and the Jackson County Farmers Market — are open year-round. With the help of Appalachian Sustainable Agriculture Project, Xpress is providing a roundup of regional markets, including markets accepting food assistance programs.

Breathe it in: Conservation groups like Carolina Mountain Land Conservancy and Southern Appalachian Highlands Conservancy have protected more than 100,000 acres of WNC land from development.

Conservati­on in WNC — where we’re going, where we’ve been

From the Get It! Guide: Long before the age of Internet lists and online travel magazines, people came to Asheville and Western North Carolina for the intrinsic natural beauty. In fact, the beauty of our environment is what many say makes this place so special. But are we protecting what we have? What initiatives are underway to help ensure that the region remains a respite and a haven for generations to come?

“We're trying to integrate both cultural and traditional knowledge, as well as build a sense of ownership for the kids over growing their own food and their own health,” says Katie Rainwater of Cherokee Central School and FoodCorps. “The best way to do that is to get dirty.”

Empowermen­t from the Earth: Reclaiming Cherokee health and heritage

Cherokee is a community in flux. Decadeslong high poverty and unemployment rates are beginning to decline, but access to healthy food remains limited and cultural values seem to be changing. “It’s Western civilization versus our traditional Cherokee ways,” say community leaders. But community efforts are using gardens to reconnect the Cherokee people to local food, health and a collective heritage defined by knowledge of the earth.

A convenient illusion: On average, the city of Asheville produces 22,400 tons of trash a year. What's the cost of all that waste? Some say the things we throw away are affecting now just our environment but our culture as well.

The consequenc­e of waste: Buncombe’s discarded problem is piling up

From the Get It! Guide: A close look at the trash collected in Asheville was shocking — 26 percent of our waste is compostable matter, 18 percent is recyclable and 56 percent is true waste, fit only for the landfill. With the city alone producing over 22,000 tons of trash a year, what is the cost of all that waste. And what is it going to take for us to reduce it?

John Mahshie of Veterans Healing Farm.

Welcome home: Veterans Healing Farm connects returning veterans to their community

From the Get It! Guide: John Mahshie says he realized the value of the exercise, healthy eating and time spent in the sun that comes with farming — and what that could mean for veterans experiencing isolation or even suicidal thoughts as they struggle to reintegrate into civilian life. “It’s a natural fit for this sort of healing,” he says.