PAST AND PRESENT: UNC Asheville history professor Daniel Pierce is the author of a new book that explores history of the Hazel Creek community in Swain County, including broken promises over the so-called “Road to Nowhere.” Photo of Pierce by Audrey Keelin

Hazel Creek author Daniel Pierce details community’­s convoluted past

Hazel Creek: The Life and Death of an Iconic Mountain Community, by UNC Asheville history professor Daniel Pierce, explores the complex history of the so-called “Road to Nowhere” and the people it was meant to serve. Released in April, the book details the multifaceted and often overlooked story of the ill-fated town of Proctor and its inhabitants.

BRIDGE OVER TROUBLED WATER: While community members largely spoke out in favor of Alternative 4B for Section B of the I-26 Connector Project, several aspects of NCDOT’s design, such as the three bridges that would span the French Broad River near Montford (above), have a coalition of Montford neighbors and others questioning the scale and scope of the design. Image via NCDOT; courtesy of DWAC

Despite progress, concerns about the I-26 Connector persist

When the DOT finally decided on a design for Section B of the Connector project in 2015, many stakeholders thought they saw light at the end of a very long tunnel. Other residents, however, see serious flaws in Alternative 4B, questioning whether the project’s long-term benefits will justify the sacrifices their neighborhoods must make to see it completed.

A FINE PLACE TO RELAX: Built by Col. Frank Coxe, the original Battery Park Hotel opened on July 12, 1886. With a fireplace in each room, modern steam radiators and electric lights, it was considered among the finest and most modern resorts of its day.

Tuesday History: Seeking rest at the Battery Park Hotel, 1886

The 1880s marked the start of Asheville’s urban growth. The decade began with approximately 2,600 permanent residents.  Advances in transportation, communication and the health industry would contribute to the city’s population increase. On Oct. 2, 1880, the first train pulled into town, offering visitors greater access to the mountains. A few years later, the arrival of two […]