BEFORE THE DEMOLITION: Architect Anthony Lord took this picture of Valley and Eagle streets before many of the surrounding homes and businesses were torn down. Stephens-Lee High School and Gymnasium are visible on the left. According to the N.C. Collection at Pack Library, it is believed these photos were taken  as part of the planning for the area's "revitalization."

Tuesday History: Before and after the East Riverside Urban Renewal Project

Conversations about the East Riverside Urban Renewal Project began in the mid-1960s. The project’s goal was to provide more public housing in Asheville. It wouldn’t be until 1977 that the plan would go into effect. The government-funded project sought to build 1,300 new homes on 425 acres. However, in order to accomplish this, many residents […]

OLD SCHOOL: ON July 25, UNC Asheville Assistant Professor of History Darin Waters will present a lecture on the history of African-American education in Asheville as part of the Lunch and Learn Lecture Series sponsored by Buncombe County. Image courtesy of UNC Asheville

Lunch and Learn Lecture Series hosts second talk

On Tuesday, July 25, Darin Waters will offer a lecture on the history of African-American education in Asheville and Western North Carolina as part of the Buncombe County Lunch and Learn Lecture Series, hosted by the county’s Department of Health and Human Services. The free event will run noon-1:30 p.m. at Stephens-Lee Recreation Center, 30 George Washington Carver Ave. in Asheville.

PAST AND PRESENT: UNC Asheville history professor Daniel Pierce is the author of a new book that explores history of the Hazel Creek community in Swain County, including broken promises over the so-called “Road to Nowhere.” Photo of Pierce by Audrey Keelin

Hazel Creek author Daniel Pierce details community’­s convoluted past

Hazel Creek: The Life and Death of an Iconic Mountain Community, by UNC Asheville history professor Daniel Pierce, explores the complex history of the so-called “Road to Nowhere” and the people it was meant to serve. Released in April, the book details the multifaceted and often overlooked story of the ill-fated town of Proctor and its inhabitants.