SIGNS OF PROTEST: In December, eight masked demonstrators gathered outside Gerard’s Clingman Avenue studio. Identifying themselves as Asheville Survivors Coalition members, the protesters carried a banner that read “Multiple Women Harassed or Assaulted by Jonas Gerard.”

Asheville Too: Arts community tackles taboo topic

The activist group Asheville Survivors Coalition has focused in recent months on bringing public attention to claims of unwanted sexual attention by anonymous women against artist Jonas Gerard. While some local organizations and businesses have removed Gerard’s work from their facilities in the wake of the activists’ protests, others have not. The arts community’s response has taken a variety of forms.

BIG EXPENSES: Duke is building two natural gas-fueled electric generating units at Lake Julian south of Asheville to replace its existing coal plant. Duke estimates that project will have an $890 million price tag and the cost to close coal ash basins there will be about $422 million. Photo by Virginia Daffron

Regulators approve lower-than-requested Duke Energy rate increase, impose coal ash penalty

The N.C. Utilities Commission today approved a rate increase requested by Duke Energy Progress. As approved, Duke may charge an average increase of 7.09 percent. The electricity provider also received permission to increase the basic monthly customer charge for residential customers from $11.13 to $14.

PARKING ROW: The Asheville Foundry Inn property backs up to the Mt. Zion Missionary Baptist Church parking lot, where the hotel leases 75 spaces. Photo by Leslie Boyd

Mt. Zion must wait to build new education facility

Relations between Mount Zion Missionary Baptist Church and its new neighbor, Asheville Foundry Inn, have been strained since construction began on the inn two years ago. A judge has now issued a temporary injunction to block the church from commencing construction on a new education building and parking lot improvements, which the hotel says would deprive it of the use of 75 parking spaces it is leasing from the church.

SECOND OPINION: Larry Johnson, with microphone, of Flat Rock asks a question after Monday's late showing of 'Fix It: Health Care at the Tipping Point.'  Photo by Sammy Feldblum

Health care documentar­y in Flat Rock looks to heal a broken system

Dr. Marsha Fretwell addressed a crowd of 25 in blunt terms Monday in Flat Rock: “We need to get for-profit health insurance out of the marketplace.” Fretwell, a former geriatric physician and a member of Healthcare for All Western North Carolina, crystallized the thesis of the documentary Fix It: Health Care at the Tipping Point, which had […]

THE LONG ROAD HOME: For older residents of WNC and those like Barb Knight, who has cerebral palsy, finding a suitable and affordable long-term care facility can be a dizzying experience. Luckily, there is a variety of local resources and professionals to help assist in finding the right home for residents and their loved ones. Photo by Max Hunt

Navigating WNC’s long-term care options

Few words have the ability to inspire more fear, frustration and trepidation among older Americans across the country than “nursing home.” But for those confronting the prospect of needing long-term care, a variety of care options and support services across Western North Carolina provides information to help residents find the best care available.