SIGNS OF PROTEST: In December, eight masked demonstrators gathered outside Gerard’s Clingman Avenue studio. Identifying themselves as Asheville Survivors Coalition members, the protesters carried a banner that read “Multiple Women Harassed or Assaulted by Jonas Gerard.”

Asheville Too: Arts community tackles taboo topic

The activist group Asheville Survivors Coalition has focused in recent months on bringing public attention to claims of unwanted sexual attention by anonymous women against artist Jonas Gerard. While some local organizations and businesses have removed Gerard’s work from their facilities in the wake of the activists’ protests, others have not. The arts community’s response has taken a variety of forms.

GREEN THUMB: Activist and farmer Karen Washington grew her first tomato in 1985. She's been involved in the food and farm scene ever since.

Small bites: Karen Washington uses food to connect the dots

The 2014 James Beard Leadership Award-winner Karen Washington will lead a workshop in anticipation of the Organic Growers School spring conference. Also, Food Connection hosts Chefs in Action; Curragh Chase pop-up dinner at Summit Coffee; White Labs Kitchen & Tap debuts fermentation series; Hickory Nut Gap Farm hosts whole hog butchery class; and James Beard Award semifinalists are announced.

UNCA’s OLLI hosts free workshop on end-of-life medical treatment decisions

Press release from UNC Asheville:  To help people think through end-of-life medical treatment decisions in advance, the Osher Lifelong Learning Institute (OLLI) at UNC Asheville will hold a free workshop, open to everyone, from 4:30-6:30 p.m. on Thursday, Feb. 22, at the Reuter Center on the university campus. Assistance will be provided so that attendees […]

A CONTINUED PRESENCE: OnJune 26, 1900, Asheville's Young Men's White Supremacy club held its inaugural meeting. Twenty-four years later, the Ku Klux Klan rallied in downtown Asheville.

Asheville Archives: ‘White supremacy made permanent,’ 1900

In 1900, N.C. was set to vote on an amendment to its state constitution. Literacy tests were among the additions proposed. Illiterate white men, however, need not worry. This point was made clear in a Jan 30, 1900 Q&A in The Asheville Daily Citizen. Titled, “WHITE SUPREMACY MADE PERMANENT,” the piece answered all inquiries and concerns surrounding the amendment.