LODGING LIMITS: At its Oct. 3 meeting, Asheville City Council asked the Planning and Zoning Commission to consider removing lodging of 20 rooms or fewer from the permitted uses in the Haywood Road form-based code district. Image courtesy of the city of Asheville

City Council talks tough on short-term lodging

Asheville City Council appears committed to holding the city’s line on any potential expansion of short-term rentals. Council members put the kibosh on a proposal to allow short-term rentals on a stretch of Haywood Road in West Asheville, while also instructing city staff to explore banning the practice in all areas of the city, including the River Arts District and downtown. Homestays, a type of accommodation where the primary resident is home during a guest’s short-term stay, would remain legal.

ROLLING ALONG: The 11th annual Tour de Pumpkin on Oct. 7 will let cyclists enjoy the countryside around Rutherfordton with tour distances of 50 or 100 kilometers. The ride is one of several cycling events that celebrate the crisp weather and brilliant colors of autumn. Photo courtesy of the Tour de Pumpkin

ICYMI: Xpress stories from the issue of Sept. 27, 2017

From the area’s largest single construction project to fall planting, Xpress has the scoop on local fall happenings. Here are some of our best stories from the previous week to keep you reading as you wait for our next issue, coming to a paper box near you on Wednesday, Oct. 4.

PAST AND FUTURE: Oliver G. Prince Jr., one of the first students to integrate Asheville School, meets with current students. Photo courtesy of Asheville School

Asheville School alu­m looks back at racial integratio­n

Editor’s note: This article was submitted by Asheville School. On Thursday, Sept. 21, Oliver G. Prince Jr., class of 1971, addressed the Asheville School community on the 50th year of racial integration at the school. Prince and his classmates, Al McDonald and Frank DuPree, were the first three African-American students enrolled in Asheville School in 1967. […]

TO THE RESCUE: The willingness of U.S. Army pilots to make dangerous maneuvers in heavily forested mountain terrain ultimately rescued more than 100 people in the aftermath of the March 1993 blizzard. Photo courtesy of Great Smoky Mountains Association

How to not die in the Smokies

When you think about the Great Smoky Mountains, your thoughts might not immediately jump to death and destruction. But that is exactly what adventure travel writer David Brill of Morgan County, Tenn., dives into with his new book, “Into the Mist: Tales of Death and Disaster, Mishaps and Misdeeds, Misfortune and Mayhem in Great Smoky Mountains National Park.”