PLACE TO CALL HOME: Jimmy Yamin of Workforce Homestead described plans for a 70-unit affordable apartment complex in Candler off Smokey Park Highway on April 10. Asheville City Council approved Yamin's zoning request unanimously and also approved a $600,000 loan from the city's Affordable Housing Trust Fund in support of the project. Photo by Virginia Daffron

City sustainabi­lity efforts fall short of annual goal in 2017

After years of progress toward waste and carbon emission reduction goals, the city hit a wall in 2017, according to a report presented to Asheville City Council on April 10. Asked for bright ideas about how sustainability efforts can get back on track to achieve long-term goals, city staffers said that, without significant additional investment, progress is likely to be limited to incremental gains.

A SORE SUBJECT: For more than three decades, the CTS of Asheville Superfund site on Mills Gap Road has been a source of physical and social toxicity for the surrounding community. Photo courtesy of Katie Damien

CTS contaminat­ion has poisoned more than drinking water

For nearly 30 years, the CTS of Asheville Superfund site has been a source of physical and social toxicity for the surrounding community. With remedial efforts to address the source of contamination finally underway, residents, activists and others reflect on the triumphs and tribulations of the decades-long battle for a clean-up and accountability.

EBB AND FLOW: One of many interactive science activities that will be featured at the inaugural Asheville Arts and Science Festival, the enviroscape table shows how water flows through a watershed. Event exhibitor Mariah Hughes explains, “Ivy River Partners facilitates partnerships to get solutions on the ground that reduce pollutants from runoff. The watershed model can be used to demonstrate how those solutions work.” Photo courtesy of Ivy River Partners

Asheville Arts and Science Festival combines two discipline­s at Salvage Station

A new local festival will come to Salvage Station on Saturday, March 31. Organizers of the Asheville Arts and Science Festival hope to raise awareness about what science looks like in the real world. And by incorporating a healthy dose of art, the family-friendly event also aims to hook visitors with the beauty that science can inspire.