JourneyAsheville: Appalachian Trail S.W.E.A.T. Crew

Calie Sanchez, Palm Beach Gardens, Fla., gives a two thumbs up after helping to remove a tree that had fallen across the trail.

The Appalachian Trail is marked by 2-by-inch white blazes to keep hikers from getting lost.

Deer, bear and wild boar are just some of the wildlife seen on the AT.

Meagan from Tampa, Fla., enjoys a stroll in the woods in the evening after a hard day on the AT.

… and more deer.

It takes awhile for the morning haze to burn off on top of the Smokies as is evident from this photo of Derek’s Knob Shelter.

Chainsaws are not allowed on the trail due to noise and air pollution. All the trees are felled with crosscut saws.

A good book, a fire in the fireplace makes for a semi-comfortable day in the shelter. The Smokies receive an average annual rainfall of 82”.

“Pulaski’s” are the workhorse of the tools used.  Every member of the S.W.E.A.T. Crew carries in one or two tools in addition to what’s in their backpacks bringing the total weight carried by each crew member into the 60- to 80-pound range.

After being shuttled to the top of Clingman’s Dome, the S.W.E.A.T. Crew double checks the gear before hiking 12 miles to what will be “basecamp” for the week.

The reason they’re called The Smokies.

Food is stored 30-40 feet in the air so that bear and other critters won’t be attracted into camp by the smell of a free meal.

Most shelters on the AT are tucked into a widespot on the trail.

Lightweight “stoves” are used to make sure everyone has a hot meal after a day of chopping trees on the AT

Foot care is very important on the AT. Here Mateo (Asst. Trail Crew Leader) from Atlanta, helps take care of Treavor’s feet.

Asst. Trail Crew Leader Mateo with the Trail Crew Leader Jamie from Virginia

S.W.E.A.T. stands for “Smokies Wildnerness Elite Appalachian Trail” Crew.  The “Delta Force” of trail maintenance.

The tools are hung and stored each evening before everyone relaxes over dinner.

In many places the AT is 12 – 18 inches wide and follows along a “knife edge ridge”. Fall to one side and you’re in Tennessee. Fall to the other and you’re in Virginia.

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3 thoughts on “JourneyAsheville: Appalachian Trail S.W.E.A.T. Crew

  1. Jake

    Thanks, Jerry, for documenting the SWEAT crew, and bringing it to MtnX.

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