Putting housing first: Champagne bar hosts benefit today to end homelessness

Putting housing first: Champagne bar hosts benefit today to end homelessness-attachment0

While sipping on a glass of wine or grabbing a late night coffee, residents can help fund an organization working to end homelessness locally and stopping people from spending the night in the harsh winter weather.

“Every time it is cold and I go into my own house, I think, ‘It is not OK that people in our community are sleeping outside tonight,” says Emily Ball, director of community engagement at Homeward Bound of Asheville.

Today, Feb. 12, from 6-8 p.m., 10 percent of sales at the Battery Park Book Exchange Champagne Bar will go to Homeward Bound. The money raised will go to the day-to-day costs of operating the organization.

“Anytime there is an event like this or anyone gives us money, the way that I think of it is that they are really investing in the solution to homelessness,” Ball observes. “Without support, a building, electricity and all of those things, it is impossible for us to move people into housing. You’re directly contributing to the ability to solve the problem by moving folks out of shelter, and campsites and off the streets and into their own homes.”

With 482 people already housed and an 89 percent retention rate, Homeward Bound uses the housing first model. “It is going to be really difficult for you to get employment or get sober or get your mental health sorted out or get healthy while you don’t know know where you’re sleeping tonight and it is February in Western North Carolina,” Ball explains.

Once people are in homes and have a basic level of stability and safety, Ball says Homeward Bound works with the individuals to become self-sustaining.

“If there are things in your life that would prevent you from staying in housing, like a severe, untreated mental illness, that has gotten you kicked out in the past, then we want to work with you on getting connected to mental health care so that you can maintain your housing long-term,” Ball says.

In order to find grant money to get people into housing, Homeward Bound considers factors including income and likelihood someone will be self-sustaining in six months, 12 months, or if they have disabilities that may prevent them from ever being self-sufficient. They usually find out this information when people come to the A HOPE Day Center, one of the programs they run. A HOPE is Western North Carolina’s only day center for people experiencing homelessness.

“A HOPE provides basic services, showers, mail, and storage to folks,” Ball adds.  “When people come in for access to A HOPE, they are also talking to staff members and trying to figure out of these half-a-dozen avenue we have into housing people, is there one that will work for you and be a permanent solution.”

Benefit Details:
WHAT: Benefit for Homeward Bound
WHERE: Battery Park Book Exchange (1 Page Ave Asheville, NC 28801)
WHEN: February 12, 6 p.m. – 8 p.m.
HOW: 10 percent of sales will be donated to Homeward Bound

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2 thoughts on “Putting housing first: Champagne bar hosts benefit today to end homelessness

  1. K

    I really wish things like this would be publicized more than 24 hours before the event happens. Concerts get no end of publicity in the weeks leading up to them but things like this, not so much. This is something I would have loved to have attended and I would have been able to do so had I known about it earlier. I wish them the best of luck tonight.

  2. K

    I really wish things like this would be publicized more than 24 hours before the event happens. Concerts get no end of publicity in the weeks leading up to them but things like this, not so much. This is something I would have loved to have attended and I would have been able to do so had I known about it earlier. I wish them the best of luck tonight.

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