Letter writer: ‘Black Lives Matter’ essay yielded sadness, hope

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Graphic by Lori Deaton

I was recently touched deeply by the article “Black Lives Matter: Enough Is Enough” [Nov. 30, Xpress]. The perspective shared was very real and deep. And I was saddened to hear that [the writer, Robert White] has apprehension to stroll near his own home. But I understand why. I wish that I could say that I was shocked by his concern, and I wish that I could say that I thought he was wrong. I cannot, which is incredibly sad.

I could also hear in Robert’s writing that it sounded like Robert has hope; I do, too. I pray that we can all keep that hope, move forward toward honest self-reflection and change.

— Abbey Dyer
Asheville

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3 thoughts on “Letter writer: ‘Black Lives Matter’ essay yielded sadness, hope

  1. The Real World

    Abbey – there are many, many people who live with apprehension. Ask women; ask them. They live with an ever-present, low level degree of apprehension their entire lives. Why is Robert White’s more relevant?

    And, I will state again (for those who are purely overcome by emotion rather than also using critical thinking), Mr. White did not describe ANY actual threat or poor treatment of any kind. It seemed obvious to me that he was in a psychological adjustment period from having lived in New Jersey for a long time and now in a Southern and more rural area. If someone moved from WNC to NJ, it would a helluva adjustment too. All is going to be fine.

    • Max Hunt

      Not sure about what area Mr. White grew up in, but I’m from a rural part of NJ. It’s not as different as one might think….

  2. The Real World

    There are some topographical similarities between parts of NJ and Leicester. But, culturally? Nooooooo.

    And it seemed clear by what he wrote that he came from a more multi-cultural environment (typical of much of the Northeast). So now being in a place where he and his wife were the “different” ones and also his neighbors had some habits he wasn’t accustomed to — well, the acclimation process takes a little while. All told , it takes a few years, really.

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