In brief: Noise studied, teachers trained and wildflower­s honored

Local divisions of the N.C. Department of Transportation won recognition in the state’s annual Wildflower Awards, while the city of Asheville studies noise and the Buncombe Partnership for Children deploys a $400,000 grant to train up to 60 new early childhood educators in Buncombe, Henderson, Madison and Transylvania counties.

Kenilworth residents and Mission Hospital representatives at the Noise Ordinance Appeals Board

No resolution for Mission Hospital and Kenilworth residents after packed noise hearing

Rick Daniels, representing Mission, and Sean Devereux, a lawyer for the neighborhood, announced after a lengthy recess that the two parties would continue negotiations outside the appeals board process. However, the residents did not formally withdraw their complaint and could return to the board at a later date.

Map of Kenilworth and Mission Health

Kenilworth residents renew noise complaint against Mission Hospital

Earlier this summer, Kenilworth residents followed up on a complaint first sent to the city of Asheville in September 2017. They allege that changes Mission has made to address their noise concerns haven’t eliminated the problem — and that the health system wasn’t acting in good faith when it entered into discussions with the community.

Push for more restrictiv­e noise rules goes to Council committee today

A push for more restrictive noise rules throughout the city is making its way to Asheville City Council’s Public Safety Committee this afternoon, March 26. One proposal, from a member of the Coalition of Asheville Neighborhoods, seeks changes to Asheville’s rules, such as designating singing, musical instruments and “noisy parties” after 10 p.m. as potential nuisances.

City Attorney: ordinance generally allows personal megaphones

Street preachers using personal amplification are a regular sight at Bele Chere, but an Occupy Asheville protester was told by an Asheville Police Department officer that city ordinance requires them to put away their megaphone. However, according to City Attorney Bob Oast, the city generally allows the use of personal amplification in public space.