Short Term 12-attachment0

Short Term 12

Movie Information

The Story: A look into the lives of some young social workers and their charges in a foster care center. The Lowdown: Disarming in its honesty and simplicity, Short Term 12 arrives on the local film scene with little fanfare, which is too bad because it's a little gem of a movie.
Score:

Genre: Drama
Director: Destin Daniel Cretton
Starring: Brie Larson, John Gallagher, Jr., Kaitlyn Dever, Stephanie Beatriz, Rami Malek, Keith Stanfield
Rated: R

You are unlikely to encounter a more unassuming little film than Destin Daniel Cretton’s Short Term 12 — nor a more surprisingly effective one. In all honesty, when I read the premise and the critical gush, I groaned at the prospect of sitting through this. And when I was assailed by a barrage of indiscriminately edited hand-held camera at the onset, my expectations went even lower. And then something unexpected happened as the film took hold: I found myself completely immersed in a story that could easily have been little more than an indie soap opera. The truth is, this tale of 20-something social workers and their charges at a foster care facility probably does qualify as indie soap on a basic level, but it feels remarkably honest for all that. There is no way I ought to have liked this movie — yet I kind of loved it.

Brie Larson (you know, the young lady I recently cited as having the best moment in Don Jon?) stars as Grace, a young woman who seems to be the glue that holds together the foster care facility — along with her boyfriend, Mason (TV and stage actor John Gallagher Jr.). A mixture of humor, care, dedication and identification seems to be what drives her and makes her so effective. (Wisely, the film never quite spells out the exact nature of her identification with the foster kids.) The film pretty much just drops us into this facility and expects us to fend for ourselves, which is also precisely the situation new employee, Nate (Rami Malek, The Master), finds himself facing. Nate gets off on the wrong foot by referring to the occupants as “underprivileged kids.” In many ways, Nate functions as our onscreen alter ego, discovering the workings of the place as we do.

While much of Short Term 12 is set up to offer a series of slice-of-life glimpses into the kids who occupy this world, the largest drama involves an attitude-riddled, affluent white kid, Jayden (TV actress Kaitlyn Dever). She is placed there as a favor to her father for reasons that are sufficiently murky, which draws Grace’s attention. (And it’s not like Grace doesn’t have enough on her mind, considering that she’s pregnant, changing the dynamic of her relationship with Mason.) Slowly, Grace finds her way just far enough into Jayden’s personal world that she gets a pretty good clue as to what’s going on. But this is not the full story.

What makes the film work is that it all feels authentic (and it is based on Cretton’s own experiences as a social worker) and everything that happens and all the characters at least offer the illusion of reality. It is so good at this — in part because it never preaches — that you lose sight of the teen soaper it could so easily have slipped into. Though all the performances are spot on, Brie Larson’s Grace is clearly the standout. There isn’t even a hint of artifice about her performance — she truly seems to be this character. No, this is not, as some have enthused, the best film of the year, but it is a very good one — one that you will one day kick yourself over if you miss it. Rated R for language and brief sexuality.

Starts Friday at Fine Arts Theatre

SHARE
About Ken Hanke
Head film critic for Mountain Xpress since December 2000. Author of books "Ken Russell's Films," "Charlie Chan at the Movies," "A Critical Guide to Horror Film Series," "Tim Burton: An Unauthorized Biography of the Filmmaker."

7 thoughts on “Short Term 12

  1. Me

    I was looking on imdb and i’ve seen this guys first film, it wasn’t anything very memorable. I hope this one is better than the first.

  2. Ken Hanke

    I can’t compare the two, but this one is very good and it’s a shame that people haven’t exactly flocked to see it.

  3. Steven

    It’s better than his first feature. Much, much better. If there’s anything that this reminded me of, it was a Dardenne’s picture – only this one is brimming with optimism. I agree that more people need to see this, if only for one of the best performances of the year.

Leave a Reply

To leave a reply you may Login with your Mountain Xpress account, connect socially or enter your name and e-mail. Your e-mail address will not be published. All fields are required.