ASHEVILLE ALLEGIANCE: Herbiary, owned by Maia Toll and Andrew Celwyn, specializes in bulk herbs but carries a wide selection of organic products. Photo by Emily Nichols

Asheville’s herb shops offer supplement­s from A to Z

If you’re in need of an herbal supplement, you’re likely to find it in one of Asheville’s many herb stores, which carry products for overall health as well as specific health problems such as winter-related colds and flu. If you’re hunting for an unusual gift, many stores carry niche items such as drink concoctions, herbal smoking blends and uncommon essential oils.

GROWING PROFITS: Researchers at the Upper Mountain Research Station study the potential of medicinal herbs as a lucrative crop for area farmers. At the Aug. 15 Buncombe County Friends of Agriculture Breakfast, speaker Margaret Bloomquist will introduce attendees to the prospect of this blooming market. Photo courtesy of the Jeanine Davis Program at N.C. State University

Aug. 15 breakfast to introduce farmers to thriving market

While Western North Carolina is already known for producing high-quality medicinal herbs, there’s still plenty of potential for growers to get in on the ground floor of a market that appears poised to expand. Farmers and others interested in opportunities in medicinal herbs can learn more at the Buncombe County Friends of Agriculture Breakfast on Aug. 15.

A new kind of CSA: Community Supported Apothecary-attachment0

A new kind of CSA: Community Supported Apothecary

As cold and flu season lingers on, herbal medicine is “definitely a frontline treatment,” says Ceara Foley, director of the Appalachia School of Holistic Herbalism (ASHH). Jamie Sparks, owner and director of Herban Farmacy, agrees, and shares what she has been offering customers in her herbal CSA. Both women tout the healing powers of herbs for winter wellness and offer different suggestions for herbal remedies.