LOCAL HARVEST: From left, restaurateur Hector Diaz, his wife, Aimee Diaz, and Mike Fortune load produce into Hector's truck for an early-morning delivery. The Diaz' farm, Salsa's 44, supplies produce to their four Asheville restaurants. Photo by Cindy Kunst

Back to the hills: Asheville’s fight for a sustainable farm-to-table system

Mike Fortune started Green Hill Urban Farm nine years ago. From the road, all you see is a large, densely planted yard behind three West Asheville homes; gnarly trees with big bushes underneath. But in fact, the farm raises rabbits, ducks, geese, mushrooms and artichokes; figs, pears, plums, cherries, raspberries, blueberries. It’s hard to believe […]

Image courtesy of Paula Nelson

SeptemberFest celebrates the community harvest

The growing season is winding down, which means it’s time for gardeners to celebrate their harvests. In that spirit, Waynesville’s Frog Level will host the inaugural SeptemberFest on Saturday, Sept. 13. The event aims to celebrate and share the bounty of community gardens, while raising awareness of sustainability, preservation and community-building.

Photo courtesy of World Coffee Cafe.

Why I grow: Downtown rooftop gardening

More and more of Asheville’s downtown dwellers are finding creative ways to use their urban spaces for growing food. Russell Thomas, owner of the Flatiron Building, tells Xpress how he and his staff are converting the rooftop of the historic building into a hydroponic and raised-bed garden that is a source of both veggies and renewable energy for the building and its businesses. 

Photo by Jessica Merchant, courtesy of FEAST.

FEAST supplements the curriculum with garden-based education

Incorporating garden-based education with an emphasis on healthy eating into the regular curriculum is the goal of two in-school programs run by FEAST, an extension of Slow Foods Asheville. Funds gathered by FEAST and school PTOs will support faculty positions in two elementary schools this academic year where a FEAST Garden and Cooking Coordinator will work to bring the schools’ gardens into the classroom.

Greening up the neighborhood: Gardeners like Joel Beacola are transforming unmaintained city spaces into public gardens. But navigating the bureaucracy of gardening in public spaces can be a hurdle. Photo by Carrie Eidson.

Greening tactics: Different paths lead to gardens in abandoned spaces

Many gardens in Asheville rest on public property that was once overgrown and unused. These spaces have been transformed but the methods that brought the transformation sometimes differ. Some gardeners in Asheville have taken their spots through guerrilla gardening. In some ways it’s comparable to being a graffiti artist or even a squatter, but some say it’s preferable to jumping through the hoops of bureaucracy.

Black Mountain librarian Denise King. Photo by Carrie Eidson

Check it out: Seed sharing is sprouting at the library

The premise of a seed library is relatively simple — patrons of the library “check out” their selections to grow the season’s crops and then return usable seeds from their harvest at the end of the season. The goal is to provide a free source of locally adapted crops and contribute to the biodiversity of local agriculture. Ideally, as the seed library continues to operate, the number of seeds and varieties available will continue to increase.