Elaine Ingham

Elaine Ingham’s manifesto: Let your garden’s wisdom guide your gardening and your life

“We need to educate people to understand that plants can, indeed, take care of themselves without people getting in the way,” asserts Elaine Ingham, an iconic figure in organic farming and a world-renowned soil microbiologist who is returning to Western North Carolina for two upcoming engagements later this week.

Dr. Marshall Shepherd

Shepherd addresses Asheville’s American Meteorolog­ical Society

Given the title of the talk — Zombies, Sports, and Cola: What does it mean for Communicating Weather and Climate? — Shepherd had quite a bit of explaining to do. Remarkably, however, the former NASA scientist managed to demonstrate, with these seemingly disparate subjects, how a significant portion of the public (mis)understands meteorology — and how the problem may be solved.

"Chickens are a perfect starting point for anyone who wants to be more connected to their food," says Justin Rhodes, creator of Asheville's newest chicken-raising film tutorial. Photo of key film contributors from Justin Rhodes' Kickstarter page

Faces in the crowd: WNC crowdfundi­ng campaigns

Crowdfunding platforms make it possible for individuals and organizations of any size to harness social networks and raise startup capital for projects that might otherwise fail due to lack of funding. This week: self-reliance through chickens, new adventures at Firestorm Books and a re-published Tarot classic.

Set sail: Planes will tow motorless gliders toward Mount Mitchell, where they’ll be released into powerful wind waves in the hopes of soaring to great heights. Local Wave Camp organizer Sarah Arnold is pictured here being towed in a glider. Photo courtesy of Arnold.

Surfing the skies: Gliders fly high above Mount Mitchell

More than just birds are soaring the winds above Mount Mitchell. Dozens of pilots from around the country will soon attempt to fly motorless gliders over 20,000 feet above the area’s highest peak. They hope to be propelled upward by a natural phenomenon known as wind waves, which crest when air currents blow against the mountain ridge from the northwest.

StoneArticle-2

Stone medicine offers the healing power of the earth

“Stones are truly as fundamental as it gets,” says Sarah Thomas, owner of Clarity Acupuncture and Clarity Stone Medicine, who has been studying Chinese medicine and the applications of stones in healing for the past eight years. “Indigenous cultures of the past such as the Taoists and Native Americans realized that everything in nature had a purpose […]

Gary Sizer, Asheville resident, hiked 2,185.3 miles from Georgia to Maine in 2014. The Appalachian Trail took him 153 days to complete. All photos courtesy of Gary Sizer

Tales from the Trail: Walking Appalachia from Georgia to Maine

Since its initial construction in 1937, 15,524 people are said to have completed the thru-hike of the Appalachian Trail — “2,000-milers,” they’re called. Inspiration behind embarking on such a physically and mentally challenging journey varies from person to person, but deep down it satiates core human needs for renewal and a reconnection with nature.

Dr. Marshall Shepherd

Zombies in the forecast? Former NASA scientist Marshall Shepherd at UNCA Feb. 23

What do zombies, sports and cola have to do with the weather? On Monday, Feb. 23, Dr. Marshall Shepherd — the director for the program in atmospheric sciences at the University of Georgia — intends to tackle that question in a presentation titled “Zombies, Sports, and Cola: What does it mean for Communicating Weather and Climate?”  The […]