BUILDING CULTURE: From the ancestors of the Ani Katuah to the first European settlers and later tobacco farmers, the evolution of human settlement and existence in the Southern Appalachians can be traced through the structure and buildings they erected to support their ways of life. The Rural Heritage Museum at Mars Hill University documents the evolution of built structures in its latest exhibit, Shelter on the Mountain, on display through May 28. Photo of an open cathedral-like hayloft of the 1951 gambrel-roof barn built by Delbert and Charlie Shelton in the Shelton Laurel community. By Earthsong Photography/ Don McGowan

Rural Heritage Museum highlights history of WNC barns

From the Ani Katuah to white settlers and tobacco farmers, barns and buildings have played a central role in defining the culture of the Southern Appalachians. Shelter on the Mountain: Barns and Building Traditions of the Southern Highlands traces the evolution of local building practices.

STAIRSTEPS TO HEALTH: Martha Mosseller, left, a participant in the YWCA Diabetes Wellness and Prevention Program, receives coaching from fitness associate and personal trainer Jackie Robertson. Photo courtesy of YWCA

Exercise and a healthy diet help prevent Type 2 diabetes

Buncombe County, like much of the nation, has a diabetes problem. The disease was ranked as the 10th-leading cause of death in the county in the 2015 Community Health Assessment, an annual gathering of data from residents to determine local wellness in relation to state and national averages. While there are numerous reasons why this has become an […]