DANCING QUEENS: "Qoya means 'queen,' and we are preparing the space for queens to enter, for goddesses, for royalty. Flowers, spritzers, candles, cards," says Lyndsey Azlynne about the movement practice. Photo by Emily Nichols

Qoya emerges as a new feminine movement modality in Asheville

One of Asheville’s newest activities embraces dance, yoga, shamanic ritual, pilgrimage and community connection, says local astrologer Virginia Rosenberg. It’s called Qoya (pronounced COY-uh), and “the guiding principle is there is no way you can do it wrong,” she says. ‘Qoya,’ which means ‘queen’ in Quechuan, a pre-Incan language in Peru, captures the empowerment women […]

COAT OF MANY COLORS: Jacob sheep have finer coats than many primitive sheep breeds, making them an ideal choice for farmers looking for a hardy, easy-to-keep fiber animal. Photo courtesy of Elizabeth Strub of Hobbyknob Farm

Woolly bully: Local farmers preserve heritage breeds

Heritage livestock breeds have a lot to offer WNC’s small farmers. Fiber animals that evolved on small farmsteads are hardier and easier to manage than breeds developed for high yields and consistent characteristics. WNC farmers are exploring the advantages these heritage breeds offer, protecting them from possible extinction along the way.

RIDING THE RAILS: A Frieght rider waves from the front of a passing car just north of Marshall, North Carolina. He is one of an untold number of men and women traversing the country in the shadows of rail cars — despite substantial  legal and personal risks — in search of adventure, work or a new horizon. Photo by Max Hunt

Off the beaten track: Freight trains, freedom and the traveling culture

Americans love to celebrate the iconic “hobo” lifestyle, yet we’re often quick to stereotype or judge the modern-day iteration of the traveler. Despite the risk of legal repercussions and personal injury, contemporary traveling culture continues to attract people from all walks of life to the rails and the road in search of the next horizon.