FIND YOUR WAY: Eliada hosts WNC’s largest Corn Maze with 100 percent of proceeds going toward caring for the Eliada kids and families. The 2016 Corn Maze and Signature Event theme is “Going the Distance for Eliada Kids!” This year’s design features an airplane, clouds, a globe, and local business and title sponsor, MB Haynes. Photo of the past Eliada corn maze courtesy of Eliada

Weekend Picks: Friday, Sept. 23 – Sunday, Sept. 25

It is the first official weekend of Autumn and there are plenty of fun adventures ripe for the picking! Whether you are off to see The Montford Player’s presentation of Pride and Prejudice, Western Carolina University’s Mountain Heritage Day, a Pan Harmonia concert or to get lost in Eliada’s annual corn maze, this weekend is jam packed with […]

SOCIAL SOLUTIONS: Senior Police Officer Doug Sheehan, along with others members of the Asheville Police Department Housing Unit, attend a Johnston Elementary School ice cream social. Local officers devote time and energy to socializing and trying to build relationships in the face of broad disillusionment in black communities. Photo courtesy of APD

Culture clash: Facing up to Asheville’s troubled police-community relations

The task of establishing and/or re-establishing trust between vulnerable communities — especially people of color — and the Asheville Police Department will be a challenging one. And especially in the wake of controversial police use of force over the summer, there is vocal criticism of the department. But the way Chief Tammy Hooper sees it, the APD must rise to that challenge.

Asheville-based Avadim Technologies announced an expansion to Black Mountain. Company officials say the move will create 551 jobs and include $25 million in investments.

UPDATED: 551 jobs, $25 million in investment­s coming to Black Mountain

Asheville-based Avadim Technologies is expanding to Black Mountain in a move company officials say will create 551 jobs and bring more than $25 million in capital investment. Ben Teague, executive director of Economic Development Coalition, says it’s the largest single job announcement during his tenure, and possibly the largest in the history of Buncombe County. County […]

Bill Hagan Book Cover

Sex, Lies and Bloomer Dust: Local resident recounts Asheville’s past

Bill Hagan has worn many hats: publisher, licensed North Carolina auctioneer, pro-wrestling promoter and former peanut pusher, to name a few of the businesses he’s been involved in over the years. With all these experiences under his belt, the Asheville native – with the help of his daughter Judy Hagan Babbit – has written a […]

Kids took over the downtown streets for fun Sunday. Photo by Adam McMillan

In photos: Open Streets Asheville Festival

The inaugural Open Streets Asheville brought residents and visitors into the streets to enjoy downtown in a new way. With Battery Park Avenue, Wall Street and portions of Haywood Street, Patton Avenue and Church Street closed to automotive traffic, folks did art projects, movement-based activities, listened to buskers and relaxed with yoga and massage.

SHARE THE ROAD: Big changes are on the way for the River Arts District in the coming years, as the city of Asheville and its partners get set to begin a host infrastructure improvements aimed at improving transportation into and around the RAD and upgrading multimodal options for pedestrians and cyclists. Photo by Max Hunt

Road to redevelopm­ent: Big infrastruc­ture upgrades on RAD’s horizon

Asheville’s rustic, arts-and-industry-dominated River Arts District is on the brink of a major transformation. From road realignment, sidewalk construction and expanded bike lanes to an ambitious network of greenways with the RAD as its central hub, substantial changes will be taking place over the next few years that will improve the way residents and visitors to the city access, explore and inhabit the area.

A DAY AT THE RAD: For artists and makers who came to the River Arts District in the late '80s and early '90s, there is a mixed response to the area's growth and the people it attracts.

State of the arts: Where are you going, where have you been?

Ambivalence permeates the River Arts District. For many, its continued growth seems inevitable. Some speak of it with a hint of despair, others address it matter-of-factly. Regardless of who is talking, you can almost hear the inner monologue going on inside their heads — the back-and-forth of what was, what is and what might be.

Moments before Trump appeared on stage the crowd cheered and chanted. Photo by Dan Hesse

UPDATED: Trump speaks to full house, protesters fill streets

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump will be in town Monday, Sept. 12, to hold a rally. Large crowds, along with potential protests, are expected throughout the day. The event is scheduled to start at 6 p.m. and Trump’s website shows tickets to the rally are no longer available. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton made a […]

MAKING SPACE: Residents using Lyman Street and Riverside Drive over the next few months will notice work crews clearing trees and realigning utilities in preparation for construction affliated with the RADTIP project next Spring. Photo by Max Hunt

Cutting to the chase: What’s going on with tree removal in the River Arts District?

Residents commuting down Lyman Street and Riverside Drive have most likely noticed some serious changes to the tree line around 12 Bones. Work crews have been busy removing trees from the area, a project that is expected to continue through the fall. “I’ve been out of office almost 15 years, and I’ve gotten several calls […]

REACHING OUT: James Lee is working with the Racial Justice Coalition to build a bridge by which vulnerable communities can have input on they way they are policed. The formation of an unprecedented community policy work group seems to be a step in that direction. Lee initially contacted chief Hooper and other city leaders about putting together a work group. Photo by Able Allen

Asheville groups seek common ground on city police Use of Force policy

While July was marked by a series of protests, rallies and demands for changes to the APD’s approach to policing in the city’s marginalized communities — especially its 11 public housing neighborhoods — August saw a shift in tone, with the outline of a collaborative process arising out of discussions among the APD, City Council and a wide range of community groups convened by the Racial Justice Coalition.