BREAKING BARRIERS: Managed care organization Smoky Mountain LME/MCO and several regional health care providers are working to bring an integrated care model to WNC, beginning with a comprehensive care center at 356 Biltmore Avenue. Photo courtesy of Smoky Mountain LME/CMO.

No wrong doors: Integrated health care program offers one-stop solutions

Unless you’ve just emerged from the wilderness after several decades, chances are you’ve heard some of the roiling discussions going on across the country concerning the current state of the health care system. Whether it’s presidential candidates working on a policy speech or an individual making home budgeting decisions, implementing a comprehensive health care reform […]

Sparrow Pants and Keith Smith of The Resonant Rogues busking at the Flat Iron on Battery Park Ave. and Wall St. Photo by Erin Derham, Buskin' Blues.

Buskers to City: Don’t put art in a box

The streets and squares of Asheville were quieter than usual on the afternoon of Monday, Aug. 24. Despite brilliant sunshine and pleasant temperatures, some of the city’s best-known street performers crowded into a meeting room to give City Council members an earful about proposed busking regulations in three high-traffic areas downtown.

ART AT THE SPEED OF LIFE: Jennifer Bueno stands beside her creation "Air Pollution Over China," which references NASA satellite imagery. It incorporates hot-sculpted glass, watercolor, wood and copper wire.

Three artists work in real time during CCCD’s Back to the Drawing Board

The Center for Craft, Creativity and Design’s Back to the Drawing Board series was developed to investigate how the craft object can move beyond a static wall display. The events on Friday and Saturday, Aug. 28 and 29, will be the last in the current four part series. The takeover, as it’s called, includes a trio of artists who will each explore new approaches to traditional craft forms.

Asheville Meter Services worker Tyler White installs a new 1.5-inch meter service on Sweeten Creek Road in Asheville last Wednesday. The future management of the Asheville water system is currently in the hands of the N.C. Court of Appeals. The system consists of approximately 1,674 miles of water lines. Photo by Mike Belleme/Carolina Public Press

Should WNC’s drinking-water systems be publicly or privately owned?

Figuring out ways to preserve, repair and enhance decades-old — or even century-old — water systems provides a flood of challenges for cities, towns and communities across North Carolina’s mountains. And, experts say, ownership structures of those water systems may influence infrastructure upgrades, service quality and the ultimate price water users pay.