"Chickens are a perfect starting point for anyone who wants to be more connected to their food," says Justin Rhodes, creator of Asheville's newest chicken-raising film tutorial. Photo of key film contributors from Justin Rhodes' Kickstarter page

Faces in the crowd: WNC crowdfundi­ng campaigns

Crowdfunding platforms make it possible for individuals and organizations of any size to harness social networks and raise startup capital for projects that might otherwise fail due to lack of funding. This week: self-reliance through chickens, new adventures at Firestorm Books and a re-published Tarot classic.

Letter writer: Thousands of small solutions exist for Asheville’s white-supremacy problem

Reading Jerry Sternberg‘s opinion piece, “Gospel According to Jerry: Confessions of a Recovering Racist” [Feb. 11, Xpress], inspired a lot of feelings in me: Irritation, disgust and confusion were the big ones, but there was also a sense of relief. Here is someone with white-skin privilege talking about racism in Asheville, acknowledging that he is a recovering racist and asking about solutions.

SAY CHEESE: Katie Moore of the Cheese Store of Asheville is one of the organizers of the Carolina Mountain Cheese Fest. Xpress file photo

A cheesy affair: Movie and tasting event raises funds for Carolina Mountain Cheese Fest

With nearly a dozen local creameries in the area, quality, craft-made cheeses are in abundance in Asheville — something both the Cheese Store of Asheville and the WNC Cheese Trail are hoping to educate eaters about through the Carolina Mountain Cheese Fest on April 26. As a fundraiser for the festival, the Cheese Store of Asheville will host a cheese tasting and movie night this week at Metro Wines.

BURDEN OF MEMORY: Although Miranda Richmond Mouillot's book includes dramatic stories from her grandparents' years as Holocaust refugees, she says, "Everybody you're around has this depth of feeling and experience." Photo by Tristan Zilberman, La Fabrique de l'Image

Quiet time: Former Ashevillea­n writes of adventure, memories and family secrets

It’s the story of Anna Münster and Armand Jacoubovitch that Mouillot recounts — or, rather, unearths. The couple survived the Holocaust only to sever all ties with each other shortly after the end of World War II. Mouillot also weaves her own story into the text. “A lot of what I was grappling with in the book is the daunting realization that life is always very complex,” she says.