ON THE LOOKOUT: Noelle West, a certified nursing assistant at Mission, keeps watch over patients at risk of falling at the monitoring station. Photo by Clarke Morrison

Mission pilots patient-observer system to reduce fall injuries

With technology developed for the video gaming industry, Mission Health is piloting a groundbreaking observation system designed to prevent costly patient falls. The Cerner Patient Observer allows technicians to watch vulnerable patients remotely, talk to them and call for help when they attempt to get out of bed and risk hurting themselves in a fall. “It’s […]

MUDDY WATER’S TAKEN ALL: The Great Flood of 1916, the result of more than a week of rain and two hurricanes, ravaged Western North Carolina and its inhabitants, destroying infrastructure, stripping farmland of its topsoil and driving the sides of mountains down into the valleys. With the centennial anniversary of the flood approaching, filmmaker David Weintraub looks back on the devastation, the fortitude of WNC’s communities and why we must heed the lessons learned back then. Photo of South Depot St., Asheville, by William H. Barnhill; via Pack Memorial Library Special Collections

Rememberin­g the Great Flood of 1916

With the Great Flood’s centennial approaching, filmmaker David Weintraub has produced a documentary, Come Hell or High Water, exploring the catastrophe through descendants’ memories, historical photos and contemporary accounts. Xpress sat down with Weintraub to talk about the film, the flood’s impact on the region and the lessons to be learned.

A young Latina, perched on sturdy shoulders, waved her rainbow flag amid a massive show of support sent from Asheville to Orlando with love. Photo by Able Allen

Solidarity in grief and love: Ashevillea­ns stand in vigil for the victims of mass shooting at Pulse Bar in Orlando

To honor the victims of the deadliest mass shooting carried out by an individual in our nation’s history, Asheville people gathered for words of encouragement, an urging toward actions of love, a friendly embrace and a moment of silence. On Monday evening, streams of people filed in on foot, on bikes, and in cars to […]

PLAY TO PAY: Asheville Community Yoga member Ben Phan says yoga makes him a better person and musician. "The focus on breath and awareness has helped me become more vulnerable and present, which enhances my connection to songwriting and performing," he says. Half of the proceeds from his band's upcoming concert will go toward ACY's expansion.

Conscious party: Asheville Community Yoga stretches into a larger space with help from member Ben Phan

A singer and dexterous guitar player, Phan wrote much of his debut album Dreams in Modern Folk while walking solo from Mexico to Canada. He’ll play those songs plus some unheard numbers at a benefit concert for Asheville Community Yoga’s expansion. The Grey Eagle hosts the event on Saturday, June 18.

SOCIAL ANXIETY: Since evidence of the scope and extent of contamination began coming to public light a decade ago, the former CTS of Asheville Superfund site has bred tension and distrust between residents and the agencies charged with overseeing containment and remediation of the site. With a new remedial action plan set to be implemented by the end of 2016, many community members are hoping that EPA officials will finally follow through with cleanup measures they say are several decades late in coming.  Photo  by Dan Caylor

Toxic legacy: CTS site breeds heartache for residents

With the EPA set to implement a new remediation strategy at the CTS of Asheville Superfund site this year, some residents and public officials are cautiously hopeful that the long-standing issues might finally be addressed. Others continue to lobby federal authorities to hold the EPA accountable for past missteps and speed up the remediation process.