Photo courtesy of World Coffee Cafe.

Why I grow: Downtown rooftop gardening

More and more of Asheville’s downtown dwellers are finding creative ways to use their urban spaces for growing food. Russell Thomas, owner of the Flatiron Building, tells Xpress how he and his staff are converting the rooftop of the historic building into a hydroponic and raised-bed garden that is a source of both veggies and renewable energy for the building and its businesses. 

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Western Carolina Medical Society: The difference between hospice and palliative care

In this article, Dr. Janet Bull, medical director at Four Seasons Compassion for Life in Henderson County, explains the difference between palliative care and hospice as part of a series presented by the Western Carolina Medical Society.  This is a frequent question that people often ask us at Four Seasons Compassion for Life.  First of all, […]

Photo by Jessica Merchant, courtesy of FEAST.

FEAST supplements the curriculum with garden-based education

Incorporating garden-based education with an emphasis on healthy eating into the regular curriculum is the goal of two in-school programs run by FEAST, an extension of Slow Foods Asheville. Funds gathered by FEAST and school PTOs will support faculty positions in two elementary schools this academic year where a FEAST Garden and Cooking Coordinator will work to bring the schools’ gardens into the classroom.

In this screen grab from the below video, Buncombe County Sheriff Van Duncan dumps a bucket of ice water on North Carolina Senator Terry Van Duyn to help raise awareness and money to fight ALS.

Video roundup: Locals take the ‘Ice Bucket Challenge’

Over the last few weeks, a range of local notables have been participating in the “Ice Bucket Challenge.” Started by the nonprofit ALS Association to raise money and awareness to fight amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a lethal disorder also know as Lou Gehrig’s disease, participants agree to be dumped with a bucket of ice water. […]

Greening up the neighborhood: Gardeners like Joel Beacola are transforming unmaintained city spaces into public gardens. But navigating the bureaucracy of gardening in public spaces can be a hurdle. Photo by Carrie Eidson.

Greening tactics: Different paths lead to gardens in abandoned spaces

Many gardens in Asheville rest on public property that was once overgrown and unused. These spaces have been transformed but the methods that brought the transformation sometimes differ. Some gardeners in Asheville have taken their spots through guerrilla gardening. In some ways it’s comparable to being a graffiti artist or even a squatter, but some say it’s preferable to jumping through the hoops of bureaucracy.

Highland Brewing Co. employee Jay pours his favorite brew, the Gaelic Ale, for attendees of the 2014 Food Blog Forum. Photo by Maria McReynolds

Asheville hosts 120 hungry bloggers

Ashevilleans, more so than residents of many other cities, know where their food is raised, grown or picked and can often participate in the process with little effort. This reverence for cuisine afforded Asheville the honor of hosting Food Blog Forum’s 2014 conference, a three-day networking and educational event for 120 food bloggers from across the nation.